Boost Your Energy

Energy at Duke

With the launch of the Duke University Energy Intiative (EI) several years ago, the Center for Data and Visualization Sciences (CDVS) has seen an increased demand for all sorts of data and information related to energy generation, distribution, and pricing.  The EI is a university-wide, interdisciplinary hub that advances an accessible, affordable, reliable, and clean energy system.  It involves researchers and students from the Pratt School of Engineering, the Nicholas School of the Environment, the Sanford School of Public Policy, the Duke School of Law, the Fuqua School of Business, and departments in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences.

The creation of the EI included development of an Undergraduate Certificate in Energy and Environment and an Undergraduate Minor in Energy Engineering in the Pratt School.  An Energy Data Analytics PhD Student Fellows program is affiliated with the EI’s Energy Data Analytics Lab, and  Duke’s BassConnections program includes several Energy & Environment teams led by the Energy Initiative.

The EI website provides links to energy-related data sources, particularly datasets that have proven useful in Duke energy research projects. We will discuss below some more key sources for finding energy-related data.

Energy resources and potentials

The sources for locating energy data will vary depending on the type of energy and the spot on the source-to-consumption continuum that interests you.

The US Department of Energy’s (DoE’s) Energy Information Administration (EIA) has a nice outline of energy sources, with explanations of each, in their Energy Explained web pages. These include nonrenewable sources such as petroleum, gas, gas liquids, coal, and nuclear.  The EIA also discusses a number of renewable sources such as hydropower (e.g., dams, tidal, or wave action), biomass (e.g., waste or wood), biofuels (e.g., ethanol or biodiesel), wind, geothermal, and solar. Hydrogen is another fuel source discussed on these pages.

Besides renewability, a you might be interested in a source’s carbon footprint. Note that some of the sources the EIA lists as renewables may be carbon creating (such as biomass or biofuels), and some non-renewables may be carbon neutral (such as nuclear).  Any type of energy source clearly has environmental implications, and the Union of Concerned Scientists has a discussion of the Environmental Impacts of Renewable Energy Technologies.

The US Geological Survey’s Energy Resources Program measures resource potentials for all types of energy sources.  The Survey is a great place to find data relating to their traditional focus of fossil fuel reserves, but also for some renewables such as geothermal.  The EIA provides access to GIS layers relating to energy, not only reserves and renewable potentials, but also infrastructure layers.

The DOE’s Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is well known as a repository of technical reports, but it also hosts the DOE Data Explorer. This includes hidden gems like the REPLICA database (Rooftop Energy Potential of Low Income Communities in America), which has geographic granularity down to the Census Tract level.

For more on renewables, check out the NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), which disseminates GIS data relating to renewable energy in the US (e.g., wind speeds, wave energy, solar potential), along with some international data. The DoE’s Open Data Catalog is also particularly strong on datasets (tabular and GIS) relating to renewables.  The data ranges from very specific studies to US nationwide data.

REexplorer, showing wind speed in Kenya

For visualizing energy-related map layers from selected non-US countries, the Renewable Energy Data Explorer (REexplorer) provides an online mapping tool. Most layers can be downloaded as GIS files. The International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) also has statistics on renewables. Besides downloadable data, summary visualizations can be viewed online using Tableau Dashboards.

Price and production data

The US DOE “Energy Economy” web pages will introduce you to all things relating to the economics of energy, and their EIA (mentioned above) is the main US source for fossil fuel pricing, from both the production and the retail standpoint.

Internationally, the OECD’s International Energy Agency (IEA) collects supply, demand, trade, production and consumption data, including price and tax data, relating to oil, gas, and coal, as well as renewables.  In the OECD iLibrary go to Statistics tab to find many detailed IEA databases as well as PDF book series such as World Energy Balances, World Energy Outlook, and World Energy Statistics. For more international data (particularly in the developing world), you might want to try Energydata.info.  This includes geospatial data and a lot on renewables, especially solar potential.

Finally, a good place to locate tabular data of all sorts is the database ProQuest Statistical Insight. It indexes publications from government agencies at all levels, IGOs and NGOs, and trade associations, usually providing the data tables or links to the data.

Infrastructure (Generation, Transportation/Distribution, and Storage)

ArcGIS Pro using EPA’s eGRID data

Besides the EIA’s GIS layers relating to energy, mentioned above, another excellent source for US energy infrastructure data is the Homeland Infrastructure Foundation-Level Data (HIFLD), which includes datasets on energy infrastructure from many government agencies. These include geospatial data layers (GIS data) for pipelines, power plants, electrical transmission and more. For US power generation, the Environmental Protection Agency has their Emissions & Generation Resource Integrated Database (eGRID).  eGRID data includes the locations of all types of US electrical power generating facilities, including fuel used, generation capacity, and detailed effluent data. For international power plant data, the World Resources Institute’s (WRI’s) Global Power Plant Database includes data on around 30,000 plants, and some of WRI’s other datasets also relate to energy topics.

Energy storage can include the obvious battery technologies, but also pumped hydroelectric systems and even more novel schemes.  The US DoE has a Global Energy Storage Database with information on “grid-connected energy storage projects and relevant state and federal policies.”

Businesses

For data or information relating to individual companies in the energy sector, as well as for more qualitative assessments of industry segments, you can begin with the library’s Company and Industry Research Guide. This leads to some of the key business sources that the Duke Libraries provide access to.

Trade Associations

Trade associations that promote the interests of companies in particular industries can provide effective leads to data, particularly when you’re having trouble locating it from government agencies and IGOs/NGOs. If they don’t provide data or much other information on their websites, be sure to contact them to see what they might be willing to share with academic researchers. Most of the associations below focus on the United States, but some are global in scope.

These are just a few of the sources and strategies for locating data on energy.  For more assistance, please contact the Center for Data and Visualization Sciences: askdata@duke.edu

R Open Labs – open hours to learn more R

New this fall…

R fun: An R Learning Series
An R workshop series by the Center for Data and Visualization Sciences.

You are invited to stop by the Edge Workshop Room on Mondays for a new Rfun program, the R Open Labs,  6-7pm, Sept. 16 through Oct. 28. No need to register although you are encouraged to double-check the R Open Labs schedule/hoursBring your laptop!

This is your chance to polish R skills in a comfortable and supportive setting.  If you’re a bit more advanced, come and help by demonstrating the supportive learning community that R is known for.

No Prerequisites, but please bring your laptop with R/RStudio installed. No skill level expected. Beginners, intermediate, and advanced are all welcome. One of the great characteristics of the R community is the supportive culture. While we hope you have attended our Intro to R workshop (or watched the video, or equivalent). This is an opportunity to learn more about R and to demystify some part of R that your find confusing.

FAQ

What are Open Labs

Open labs are semi-structured workshops designed to help you learn R. Each week brief instruction will be provided, followed by time to practice, work together, ask questions and get help. Participants can join the lab any time during the session, and are welcome to work on unrelated projects.

The Open Labs model was established by our colleagues at Columbia and adopted by UNC Chapel Hill. We’re giving this a try as well. Come help us define our direction and structure. Our goal is to connect researchers and foster a community for R users on campus.

How do I Get Started?

Attend an R Open Lab. Labs occur on Mondays, 6pm-7pm in the Edge Workshop Room in the Bostock Library. In our first meeting we will decide, as a group, which resource will guide us. We will pick one of the following resources…

  1. R for Data Science by Hadley Wickham & Garrett Grolemund (select chapters, workbook problems, and solutions)
  2. The RStudio interactive R Primers
  3. Advanced R by Hadley Wickham (select chapters and workbook problems)
  4. Or, the interactive dataquest.io learning series on R

Check our upcoming Monday schedule and feel free to RSVP.  We will meet for 6 nearly consecutive Mondays during the fall semester.

Please bring a laptop with R and R Studio installed.  If you have problems installing the software, we can assist you with installation as time allows. Since we’re just beginning with R Open Labs, we think there will be time for one-on-one attention as well through learning and community building.

How to install R and R Studio

If you are getting started with R and haven’t already installed anything, consider using using these installation instructions.  Or simply skip the installation and use one of these free cloud environments:

Begin Working in R

We’ll start at the beginning, however, R Open Labs recommends that you attend our Intro to R workshop or watch the recorded video. Being a beginner makes you part of our target audience so come ready to learn and ask questions. We also suggest working through materials from our other workshops, or any of the resource materials listed in the Attend an R Open Lab section (above).  But don’t let lack of experience stop you from attending.  The resources mentioned above will be the target of our learning and exploration.

Is R help available outside of Open Labs?

If you require one-on-one help with R outside of the Open Labs, in-person assistance is available from the Library’s Center for Data & Visualization Sciences, our Center’s Rfun workshops, or our walk-in consulting in the Brandaleone Data and Visualization Lab (floormap. 1st Floor Bostock Library).

 

Introducing Duke Libraries Center for Data and Visualization Sciences

As data driven research has grown at Duke, Data and Visualization Services receives an increasing number of requests for partnerships, instruction, and consultations. These requests have deepened our relationships with researchers across campus such that we now regularly interact with researchers in all of Duke’s schools, disciplines, and interdepartmental initiatives.

In order to expand the Libraries commitment to partnering with researchers on data driven research at Duke, Duke University Libraries is elevating the Data and Visualization Services department to the Center for Data and Visualization Sciences (CDVS). The change is designed to enable the new Center to:

  • Expand partnerships for research and teaching
  • Augment the ability of the department to partner on grant, development, and funding opportunities
  • Develop new opportunities for research, teaching, and collections – especially in the areas of data science, data visualization, and GIS/mapping research
  • Recognize the breadth and demand for the Libraries expertise in data driven research support
  • Enhance the role of CDVS activities within Bostock Libraries’ Edge Research Commons

We believe that the new Center for Data and Visualization Sciences will enable us to partner with an increasingly large and diverse range of data research interests at Duke and beyond through funded projects and co-curricular initiatives at Duke. We look forward to working with you on your next data driven project!

Minding Your Business: Locating Company and Industry Data

The Data and Visualization Services (DVS) Department can help you locate and extract many types of data, including data about companies and industries.  These may include data on firm location, aggregated data on the general business climate and conditions, or specific company financials.  In addition to some freely available resources, Duke subscribes to a host of databases providing business data.

Directories of Business Locations

You may need to identify local outlets and single-location companies that sell a particular product or provide a particular service.  You may also need information on small businesses (e.g., sole proprietorships) and private companies, not just publicly traded corporations or contact information for a company’s headquarters.  A couple of good sources for such local data are the ReferenceUSA Businesses Database and SimplyAnalytics.

From these databases, you can extract lists of locations with geographic coordinates for plotting in GIS software, and SimplyAnalytics also lets you download data already formatted as GIS layers. Researchers often use this data when needing to associate business locations with the demographics and socio-economic characteristics of neighborhoods (e.g., is there a lack of full-service grocery stores in poor neighborhoods?).

SimplyAnalytics
SimplyAnalytics

When searching these resources (or any business data source), it often helps to use an industry classification code to focus your search. Examples are the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) and the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) (no longer revised, but still commonly used). You can determine a code using a keyword search or drilling down through a hierarchy.

Aggregated Business and Marketing Data

Government surveys ask questions of businesses or samples of businesses. The data is aggregated by industry, location, size of company, and other criteria and typically include information on the characteristics of each industry, such as employment, wages, and productivity.

Sample Government Resources

Macroeconomic indicators relate to the overall business climate, and a good source for macro data is Global Financial Data. Its data series includes many stock exchange and bond indexes from around the world.

Private firms also collect market research data through sample surveys. These are often from a consumer perspective, for instance to help gauge demand for specific products and services. Be aware that the numbers for small geographies (e.g., Census Tracts or Block Groups) are typically imputed from small nationwide samples, based on correlations with demographic and socioeconomic indicators. Examples of resources with such data are SimplyAnalytics (with data from EASI and Simmons) and Statista (mostly national-level data).

Firm-Level Data

You may be interested in comparing numbers between companies, ranking them based on certain indicators, or gathering time-series data on a company to follow changes over time.  Always be aware of whether the company is a publicly traded corporation or is privately held, as the data sources and availability of information may vary.

For firm-level financial detail, public corporations traded in the US are required to submit data to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

EDGAR
SEC’s EDGAR Service

Their EDGAR service is the source of the corporate financials repackaged by commercial data providers, and you might find additional context and narrative analysis with products such as Mergent Online, Thomson One, or S&P Global NetAdvantage.  The Bloomberg Professional Service in the DVS computer lab contains a vast amount of data, news, and analysis on firms and economic conditions worldwide. You can find many more sources for firm- and industry-specific data from the library’s guide on Company and Industry Research, and of course at the Ford Library at the Fuqua School of Business.

All of these sources provide tabular download options.

For help finding any sort of business or industry data, don’t hesitate to contact us at askdata@duke.edu.

Where can I find data (or statistics) on ___________?

Helping Duke students, staff and faculty to locate data is something that we in Data and Visualization Services often do.  In this blog post I will walk you through a sample search and share some tips that I use when I search for data and statistics.

“Hi there, I am looking for motorcycle registration numbers and sales volumes by age and sex for the United States.”

BREAKING DOWN THE QUESTION:

There are two types of data needed: motorcycle registration data and motorcycle sales data. There are two criteria that the data should be differentiated by: owner’s age and owner’s gender.
There is a geographic component: United States.

One criteria that is not given is time.  When a time frame isn’t provided, I assume that what is needed is the most current data available.  Something to consider is that “current” often will still be a year or more old. It takes time for data to be gathered, cleaned and published.

***Pro-tip: When you are looking for data consider who/what/when and where – adding in those components makes it easier to construct your search.***

WHERE AND HOW DO I SEARCH?

If I do not immediately have a source in mind (and sometimes even if I do, just to hit all the bases) I will use Google and structure my search as follows: motorcycle sales and registration by age and gender united states.

***Pro-tip: You can use Google (or search engine of your choice) to search across things we subscribe to and the open Web, but you will need to be connected via a Duke IP address***

EVALUATING RESULTS

One of the first results returned is from a database we subscribe to called Statistia. This source gives me the number of motorcycle owners by age in 2018, which answers part of the question, but does not include sales information or gender breakdown.

Another top result is a report on Motorcycle Trends in the United States from the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS). Unfortunately, the report is from 2009 and the data cited in the article are from 2003-2007.  A search of the BTS site does not yield any thing more current. However, when I check the source list at the bottom of the report, there are several listed that I will check directly once I’ve finished looking through my search results.

***Pro-tip: Always look for sources of data in reports and figures, even if the data are old. Heading to the source can often yield more current information.***

A third result that looks promising is from a motorcycling magazine: Motorcycle Statistics in America: Demographics Change for 2018. The article reports on statistics from the 2018 owner surveys conducted by the Motorcycle Industry Council (which is one of the sources that the Bureau of Transportation report  listed). This article provides the percent of males and females that own motorcycles as well as the median age of motorcycle owners.  While this is pretty close to the data needed, it is worthwhile to look into the Motorcycle Industry Council. Experience has taught me, however, that industry data typically is neither open nor freely available.

CHECKING THE COMMON SOURCE

When I go to the Motorcycle Industry Council (MIC) Web site I find that they do, indeed, have a statistical report that comes out every year which gives a comprehensive overview of the motorcycle industry.  If you are not a member, you can buy a copy of the report, but it is expensive (nearly $500).

***Pro-tip: Always check the original source even if you anticipate that there may be a paywall – it’s a good idea to evaluate all sources to ensure that they are credible and authoritative.***

MAKING A DECISION

In this instance, I would ultimately advise the person to use the statistics reported in the article Motorcycle Statistics in America: Demographics Change for 2018. Secondary sources aren’t ideal, and can sometimes be complicated to cite, but when you can’t get access to the primary source and that primary source is the authority, it is your best bet.

***Pro-tip: If you are using a secondary source, you should name the original source in text. For example: Data from the 2018 Motorcycle Industry Council Owner Survey (as cited by Ultimate Motorcycling, 2019) but include a citation to the secondary source in your reference list according to the formatting of the style you are using. 

PARTING THOUGHTS

In closing, the data you want might not always be the data you use – either due to the data being proprietary, restricted, or perhaps just doesn’t exist or doesn’t exist in the form you need and/or are able to use.  When this happens, take a moment to think on your research question and determine if you have the time and the resources needed to continue pursuing your question as it stands (purchasing, requesting, applying for, or collecting your own data), or if you need to broaden or change your focus to incorporate the resources you do find in a meaningful way.

OSF@Duke: By the Numbers and Beyond

The Open Science Framework (OSF) is a data and project management platform developed by the Center for Open Science that is designed to support the entire research lifecycle. OSF has a variety of features including file management and versioning, integration with third-party tools, granular permissions and sharing capabilities, and communication functionalities. It also supports growing scholarly communication formats including preprints and preregistrations, which enable more open and reproducible research practices.

In early 2017, Duke University became a partner institution with the OSF. As a partner institution, Duke researchers can sign into the OSF using their NetID and affiliate a project with Duke, which allows it to be displayed on the Duke OSF page. After 2 years of supporting OSF for Institutions here at Duke, the Research Data Management (RDM) team wanted to gain a better perspective surrounding how our community was using the tool and their perceptions. 

As of March 10, 2019, Duke has 202 users that have signed into the system using their Duke credentials (and there are possibly more users that are authenticating using personal email accounts). Of these users, 177 total projects have been created and affiliated with Duke. Forty-six of these projects are public and 132 remain private. Duke users have also registered 80 Duke affiliated projects, 62 of which are public and 18 are embargoed. A registration is a time-stamped read-only copy of an OSF project that can be used to preregister a research design, to create registered reports for journals, or at the conclusion of a project to formally record the authoritative copy of materials.

But what do OSF users think of the tool and how are they using it within their workflows? A few power users shared their thoughts:

Optimizing research workflows: A number of researchers noted how the OSF has helped streamline their workflows through creating a “central place that everyone has access to.” OSF has helped “keeping track of the ‘right’ version of things” and “bypassing the situation of having different versioned documents in different places.” Additionally, the OSF has supported “documenting workflow pipelines.”

Facilitating collaboration: One of the key features of the OSF is that researchers, regardless of institutional affiliation, can contribute to a project and integrate the tools they already use. Matt Makel, Director of Research at TIP, explains how OSF supports his research – “I collaborate with many colleagues at other institutions. OSF solves the problem of negotiating which tools to use to share documents. Rather than switching platforms across (or worse, within) projects, OSF is a great hub for our productivity.”

Offering an end-to-end data management solution: Some research groups are also using OSF in multiple stages of their projects and for multiple purposes. As one researcher expressed – “My research group uses OSF for every project. That includes preregistration and archiving research materials, data, data management and analysis syntax, and supplemental materials associated with publications. We also use it to post preprints to PsyArXiv.”

It also surfaced that OSF supported an ideological perception regarding a shift in the norms of scholarly communication. As Elika Bergelson, Crandall Family Assistant Professor in Psychology and Neuroscience, aptly put it “Open science is the way of the future.” Here within Duke University Libraries, we aim to continue to support these shifting norms and the growing benefits of openness through services, platforms, and training.

To learn more about how the OSF might support your research, join us on April 3 from 10-11 am for hands-on OSF workshop. Register here: https://duke.libcal.com/event/4803444

If you have other questions about using the OSF in a project, the RDM team is available for consultations or targeted demonstrations or trainings for research teams. We also have an OSF project that can help you understand the basic features of the tool.

Contact askdata@duke.edu to learn more or request an OSF demonstration.

Telling Stories with Maps: Esri Story Maps at Duke

Developing interactive maps that incorporate text, images, video, and audio can be time-consuming and require specialized technical skills. Fortunately, at Duke we have access to Esri Story Maps, a web-based tool that helps you quickly design engaging narratives around your maps, no coding required.

We have seen a variety of creative uses of Story Maps at Duke, including:

  • Presentations to communicate research
  • Student assignments, as an alternative to a midterm or paper
  • Tours and guides of campus
  • Tutorials to explain a topic with a spatial component
  • Portfolios to showcase projects that include maps

Krakow Story MapChristine Liu, a graduate student in the Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies, created this Story Map to illustrate a journey through Kraków under Nazi occupation.

If you are interested in building a Story Map, we recommend first spending some time exploring Esri’s curated gallery of stories to find inspiration and understand the platform’s capabilities. You can also review their collection of resources, which includes training videos, FAQs, and useful advice.

When you are ready to get started,  you can contact one of our GIS specialists (by emailing askdata@duke.edu) to schedule an appointment. We are always happy to answer questions and provide recommendations specific to your project. We also offer workshops to guide you through the process of building a basic online map, making it visually effective, and combining it with other materials to publish a Story Map.

If you already have a Story Map you want to show off, please share it with us! We are assembling a gallery of stories made at Duke and would love to feature your project.

Computational Reproducibility Pilot – Code Ocean Trial

A goal of Duke University Libraries (DUL) Code Ocean Logois to support the  growing and changing needs of the Duke research community. This can take many forms. Within Data and Visualization Services, we provide learning opportunities, consulting services, and computational resources to help Duke researchers implement their data-driven research projects. Monitoring and assessing new tools and platforms also helps DUL stay in tune with changing research norms and practices. Today the increasing focus on the importance of transparency and reproducibility has resulted in the development of new tools  and resources to help researchers produce and share more reproducible results. One such tool is Code Ocean.

Code Ocean is a computational reproducibility platform that employs Docker technology to execute code in the cloud. The platform does two key things—it integrates the metadata, code, data and dependencies into a single ‘compute capsule’, ensuring that the code will run—and it does this in a single web interface that displays all inputs and results. Within the platform, it is possible to develop, edit or download the code, run routines, and visualize, save or download output, all from a personal computer. Users or reviewers can upload their own data and test the effects of changing parameters or modification of the code. Users can also share their data and code through the platform. Code Ocean provides a DOI for all capsules facilitating attribution and a permanent connection to any published work.

In order to help us understand and evaluate the usefulness of the Code Ocean platform to the Duke research community, DUL will be offering trial access to the Code Ocean cloud-based computational reproducibility platform starting on October 1, 2018. To learn more about what is included in the trial access and to sign up to participate, visit the Code Ocean pilot portal page.

If you have any questions, contact askdata@duke.edu.

Expanding Support for Data Visualization in Duke Libraries

Angela ZossOver the last six years, Data and Visualization Services (DVS) has expanded support for data visualization in the Duke community under the expert guidance of Angela Zoss. In this period, Angela developed Duke University Libraries’ visualization program through a combination of thoughtful consultations, training, and events that expanded the community of data visualization practice at Duke while simultaneously increasing the impact of Duke research.

As of May 1st, Duke Libraries is happy to announce that Angela will expand her role in promoting data visualization in the Duke community by transitioning to a new position in the library’s Assessment and User Experience department. In her new role, Angela will support a larger effort in Duke Libraries to increase data-driven decision making. In Data and Visualization Services, Eric Monson will take the lead on research consultation and training for data visualization in the Duke community. Eric, who has been a data visualization analyst with DVS since 2015 and has a long history of supporting data visualization at Duke, will serve as DVS’ primary contact for data visualization.

DVS wishes Angela success in her new position. We look forward to continuing to work with the Duke community to expand data visualization research on campus.

Using Tableau with Qualtrics data at Duke

Logos for Qualtrics and TableauThe end of the spring semester always brings presentations of final projects, some of which may have been in the works since the fall or even the summer. Tableau, a software application designed specially for visualization, is a great option for projects that would benefit from interactive charts and maps.

Visualizing survey data, however, can be a bit of a pain. If your project uses Qualtrics, for example, you may be having trouble getting the data ready for visualization and analysis. Qualtrics is an extremely powerful survey tool, but the data it creates can be very complicated, and typical data analysis tools aren’t designed to handle that complexity.

Luckily, here at Duke, Tableau users can use Tableau’s Web Data Connector to pull Quatrics data directly into Tableau! It’s so easy, you may never analyze your Qualtrics data another way again.

Process

Here are the basics. There are also instructions from Qualtrics.

In Qualtrics: Copy your survey URLScreenshot of Tableau URL in Qualtrics

  • Go to your Duke Qualtrics account
  • Click on the survey of interest
  • Click on the Data & Analysis tab at the top
  • Click on the Export & Import button
  • Select Export Data
  • Click on Tableau
  • Copy the URL

In Tableau (Public or Desktop): Paste your survey URL

Tableau Web Data Connection

  • Under Connect, click on Web Data Connector (may be under “More…” for Tableau Public or “To a server… More…” for Tableau Desktop)
  • Paste the survey URL into the web data connector URL box and hit enter/return
  • When a login screen appears, click the tiny “Api Token Login” link, which should be below the green Log in button

In Qualtrics: Create and copy your API token

Generate Qualtrics API Token

  • Go to your Duke Qualtrics account
  • Click on your account icon in the upper-right corner
  • Select Account Settings…
  • On the Account Settings page, click on the Qualtrics IDs tab
  • Under API, check for a token. If you don’t have one yet, click on Generate Token
  • Copy your token

In Tableau (Public or Desktop): Paste your API token

  • Paste in your API token and click the Login button
  • Select the data fields you would like to import

Note: there is an option to “transpose” some of the fields on import. This is useful for many of the types of visualizations you might want to create from survey data. Typically, you want to transpose fields that represent the questions asked in the survey, but you may not want to transpose demographics data or identifiers. See also the Qualtrics tips on transposing data.

Resources

For more tips on how to use Tableau with Qualtrics data, check out the resources below: