All posts by Sophia Lafferty-Hess

Highlights from Expanding our Research Data Management Program

Since the launch of our expanded research data management (RDM) program in January, the Research Data Management Team in DVS has been busy defining and implementing our suite of services. Our “Lifecycle Services” are designed to assist scholars at all stages of their research project from the planning phase to the final curation and disposition of their data in an archive or repository. Our service model centers on four key areas: data management planning, data workflow design, data and documentation review, and data repository support. Over the past nine months, we have  worked with Duke researchers across disciplines to provide these services, allowing us to see their value in action. Below we present some examples of how we have supported researchers within our four support areas.

Data Management Planning

With increasing data management plan requirements Data Management Planningas well as growing  expectations that funding agencies will more strictly enforce and evaluate these plans, researchers are seeking assistance ensuring their plans comply with funder requirements. Through in-person consultations and online review through the DMPTool, we have helped researchers enhance their DMPs for a variety of funding agencies including the NSF Sociology Directorate, the Department of Energy, and the NSF Computer & Information Science & Engineering (CISE) Program.

Data Workflow Design

As research teams begin a project there are a variety Data Workflow Designof organizational and workflow decisions that need to be made from selecting appropriate tools to implementing storage and backup strategies (to name a few). Over the past 6 months, we have had the opportunity to help a multi-institutional Duke Marine Lab Behavioral Response Study (BRS) implement their project workflow using the Open Science Framework (OSF). We have worked with project staff to think through the organization of materials, provided training on the use of the tool, and strategized on storage and backup options.

Data and Documentation Review

During a project, researchers make decisions about how to format, Data and Documentation Reviewdescribe, and structure their data for sharing and preservation. Questions may also arise surrounding how to ethically share human subjects data and navigate intellectual property or copyright issues. In conversations with researchers, we have provided suggestions for what formats are best for portability and preservation, discussed their documentation and metadata plans, and helped resolve intellectual property questions for secondary data.

Data Repository Support

At the end of a project, researchers may be required Data Repository Supportor choose to deposit their data in an archive or repository. We have advised faculty and students on repository options based on their discipline, data type, and repository features. One option available to the Duke community is the Duke Digital Repository. Over the past nine months, we have assisted with the curation of a variety of datasets deposited within the DDR, many of which underlie journal publications.

This year Duke news articles have featured two research studies with datasets archived within the DDR, one describing a new cervical cancer screening device and another presenting cutting-edge research on a potential new state of matter. The accessibility of both Asiedu et al.’s screening device data and Charbonneau and Yaida’s glass study data enhances the overall transparency and reproducibility of these studies.

Our experiences thus far have enabled us to better understand the diversity of researchers’ needs and allowed us to continue to hone and expand our knowledge base of data management best practices, tools, and resources. We are excited to continue to work with and learn from researchers here at Duke!

Open Science Framework @ Duke

Center for Open ScienceThe Open Science Framework (OSF) is a free, open source project management tool developed and maintained by the Center for Open Science (COS). OSF offers many features that can help scholars manage their workflow and outputs throughout the research lifecycle. From collaborating effectively, to managing data, code, and protocols in a centralized location, to sharing project materials with the broader research community, the OSF provides tools that support openness, research integrity, and reproducibility. Some of the key functionalities of the OSF include:

  • Integrations with third-party tools that researchers already use (i.e., Box, Google Drive, GitHub, Mendeley, etc.)
  • Hierarchical organizational structures
  • Unlimited native OSF storage*
  • Built-in version control
  • Granular privacy and permission controls
  • Activity log that tracks all project changes
  • Built-in collaborative wiki and commenting pane
  • Analytics for public projects
  • Persistent, citable identifiers for projects, components, and files along with Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) and Archival Resource Keys (ARKs) available for public OSF projects
  • And more!

Duke University is a partner institution with OSF, meaning  you can sign into the OSF using your NetID and affiliate your projects with Duke. Visit the Duke OSF page to see some Duke research projects and outputs from our community.

Duke University Libraries has also partnered with COS to host a workshop this fall entitled “Increasing Openness and Reproducibility in Quantitative Research.” This workshop will teach participants how they can increase the reproducibility of their work and will include hands-on exercises using the OSF.

Workshop Details
Date: October 3, 2017
Time: 9 am to 12 pm
Register:
http://duke.libcal.com/event/3433537

If you are interested in affiliating an existing OSF project, want to learn more about how the OSF can support your workflow, or would like a demonstration of the OSF, please contact askdata@duke.edu.

*Individual file size limit of 5 GB. Users can upload larger files by connecting third party add-ons to their OSF projects.

Love Your Data Week (Feb. 13-17)

In cooperation with the Triangle Research Library Network, Duke Libraries will be participating in Love Your Data Week on February 13-17, 2017. Love Your Data Week is an international event to help researchers take better care of their data. The campaign focuses on raising awareness and building community around data management, sharing, preservation, and reuse.

The theme for Love Your Data Week 2017 is data quality, with a related message for each day.

  • Monday: Defining Data Quality
  • Tuesday: Documenting, Describing, and Defining
  • Wednesday: Good Data Examples
  • Thursday: Finding the Right Data
  • Friday: Rescuing Unloved Data

Throughout the week, Data and Visualization Services will be contributing to the conversation on Twitter (@duke_data). We will also host the following local programming related to the daily themes:

In honor of Love Your Data Week chocolates will be provided at these workshops!

The new Research Data Management staff at the Duke Libraries are available to help researchers care for their data through consultations, support services, and instruction.  We can assist with writing data management plans that comply with funder policies, advise on data management best practices, and facilitate the ingest of data into repositories. To learn more about general data management best practices, see our newly updated RDM guide

Contact us at askdata@duke.edu to find out how we can help you love your data! 

Get involved in Love Your Data Week by following the conversation at #LYD17, #loveyourdata, and #trlndata.

All promotional Love Your Data 2017 materials used under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Citation: Bass, M., Neeser, A., Atwood, T., and Coates, H. (2017). Love Your Data Week Promotional Materials. [image files]. Retrieved from https://osf.io/r8tht/files/