Category Archives: Duke research

Visualization Exhibit and Events

2015-01-07 16.32.31

ps_logoThis semester, Duke is proud to host the Places & Spaces: Mapping Science exhibit, visiting from Indiana University.  Places & Spaces is a 10-year effort by Dr. Katy Börner (director of the Cyberinfrastructure for Network Science Center) to bring focus to visualization as a medium of scholarly communication.

20150105_105415The exhibit includes 100 maps from various disciplines and cultures and highlights myriad visualization techniques that have been used to communicate science to a broader public. The maps are divided among three spaces on campus: The Edge (newly opened on the first floor of Bostock Library), Smith Warehouse (on the second floor of Bay 11), and Gross Hall (on the third floor).

KatyBorner_weblrgTo celebrate the opening, Dr. Börner will visit Duke on January 21st and 22nd.  She will give a keynote presentation on Wednesday, January 21, at 4pm, in the Edge.  A reception will follow.

Additional events next week and throughout the semester will celebrate the exhibit and promote ongoing visualization work at Duke.  All events are open to the public!

Upcoming events

Wednesday, January 21

Thursday, January 22

Friday, January 23

More information about the exhibit and related events is available at:
http://sites.duke.edu/scimaps/ and
http://scimaps.org/duke

Please contact Angela Zoss (angela.zoss@duke.edu) with any questions or suggestions.  We hope you can join us in celebrating and enjoying this exhibit!

Demystifying Data & GIS Services

Staff Expertise ChartConfused about Data & GIS Services?  Not sure what questions you should be asking us or what kind of services we provide?  Here’s one handy chart we’ve come up with to explain what exactly we cover in our consultations and workshops.

When it comes to picking what day to stop by our walk-in hours or knowing how much of the data life cycle our consultants cover, this graphic might be your first stop.  Whether it’s finding data, processing or analyzing that data, or mapping and visualizing that data, we have staff with expertise to help!

Still not sure who to approach or what kind of help you might need?  Just email askdata@duke.edu to get in touch with all of us at once.  Some questions can be answered quickly over email, but we’re also happy to schedule an appointment to talk in person.

Data and GIS Services Spring 2014 Workshop Series

DGSwkshpExplore network analysis, text mining, online mapping, data visualization, and statistics in our spring 2014 workshop series.  Our workshops provide a chance to explore new tools or refresh your memory on effective strategies for managing digital research.  Interested in keeping up to date with workshops and events in Data and GIS?  Subscribe to the dgs-announce listserv or follow us on Twitter (@duke_data).

Currently Scheduled Workshops

 Thu, Jan 9 2:00 PM – 3:30 PM  Data Management Plans – Grants, Strategies, and Considerations

 Mon, Jan 13 2:00 PM – 3:30 PM Webinar: Social Science Data Management and Curation

 Mon, Jan 13 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM Google Fusion Tables

 Tue, Jan 14 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM Open (aka Google) Refine 

 Wed, Jan 15 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM Stata for Research

 Thu, Jan 16 3:00 PM – 5:00 PM Analysis with R

 Tue, Jan 21 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM Introduction to ArcGIS

 Wed, Jan 22 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM ArcGIS Online

 Wed, Jan 22 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM Open (aka Google) Refine 

 Mon, Jan 27 2:00 PM – 3:30 PM Introduction to Text Analysis

 Wed, Jan 29 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM Analysis with R

 Thu, Jan 30 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM Stata for Research

 Mon, Feb 3 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM  Data Visualization on the Web

 Mon, Feb 3 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM  Data Visualization on the Web (Advanced)

 Tue, Feb 11 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM Using Gephi for Network Analysis and Visualization

 Wed, Feb 12 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM Introduction to ArcGIS

 Tue, Feb 18 2:00 PM – 3:30 PM Introduction to Tableau Public 8

 Tue, Feb 25 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM ArcGIS Online

 Thu, Feb 27 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM Historical GIS

 Mon, Mar 3 2:00 PM – 3:30 PM  Designing Academic Figures and Posters

 Tue, Mar 4 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM  Useful R Packages: Extensions for Data Analysis, Management, and Visualization

Announcing the 2014 Student Data Visualization Contest

Student Data Visualization ContestData & GIS Services will soon be accepting submissions to its 2nd annual student data visualization contest.  If you have a course project that involves visualization, start thinking about your submission now!

The purpose of the contest is to highlight outstanding student data visualization work at Duke University. Data & GIS Services wants to give you a chance to showcase the hard work that goes into your visualization projects.

Data visualization here is broadly defined, encompassing everything from charts and graphs to 3D models to maps to data art.  Data visualizations may be part of a larger research project or may be developed specifically to communicate a trend or phenomenon. Some are static images, while others may be animated simulations or interactive web experiences.  Browse through last year’s submissions to get an idea of the range of work that counts as visualization.

The Student Data Visualization Contest is sponsored by Data & GIS Services, Perkins Library, Scalable Computing Support Center, Office of Information Technology, and the Office of the Vice Provost for Research.

For more details, see the 2014 Student Data Visualization Contest page.   Please address all additional questions to Angela Zoss (angela.zoss@duke.edu), Data Visualization Coordinator, 226 Perkins Library.

Data Management Planning Advice – DMPTool @ Duke

Data and GIS Services is happy to announce the launch of new service designed to provide detailed data management planning help online.  As an increasing number of granting agencies require a data management plan as part of the grant application process, the DMPTool provides “an open source, web application that assists researchers in producing data management plans and delivering them to funders.” For Duke researchers, the tool provides constantly updated advice about how to complete a data management plan while simultaneously highlighting Duke resources available from a variety of data support providers for the planning, maintenance, and sharing of research data.

We hope that the DMPTool will streamline the grant writing process and help researchers make the appropriate connections to resources available both at Duke and beyond for data management planning.  We welcome your comments and suggestions on this resource.

DMPTool

Data and GIS Back to School – Fall 2012

Visualize your data, analyze your results, map your statistics, and find the data you need!  Come visit us in Perkins 226 (second floor Perkins) for a consultation or contact us online (email: askdata@duke.edu or twitter: duke_data OR duke_vis).  We look forward to working with you on your next data driven project.

New Data Lab Opens- August 2012

http://library.duke.edu/data/about/lab.html

With 12 workstations with dual 24″ monitors and 16 gigs of memory, the new Data and GIS lab is ready to take on the most challenging statistical, mapping, and visualization research projects.  The new lab also features a flatbed scanner for projects moving from print to digital data.  Lab hours are the same hours as Perkins Library (almost 24/7).

Visualize This!  New Data Visualization Program

Perkins Library is proud to introduce Angela Zoss our new Data Visualization Coordinator. Schedule a consultation, attend a workshop, or learn more about research in Data Visualization at Viz Forum this fall.

New workshops for Fall 2012

http://library.duke.edu/data/news/index.html

Learn about data management planning. Apply text mining strategies to understand your documents.  Visualize your data with Tableau Public, or map your results using ArcGIS or Google Earth Pro.  A new series of workshops connects traditional statistical, geospatial, and visualization tools with web based options.  Register online for our courses or schedule a session for your course by emailing askdata@duke.edu

Bloomberg Professional News and Financial Data

http://blogs.library.duke.edu/data/2011/08/29/bloomberg-has-arrived/

If you missed last fall’s Bloomberg service – Duke Libraries in pleased to announce the installation of three Bloomberg financial terminals in the Data and GIS Lab in 226 Perkins.  The terminals provide the latest news and financial data and include an application that makes it easy to export data to Excel.  Access is restricted to all current Duke affiliates.  Training on Bloomberg is currently being planned for the last week of September.  Please email askdata@duke.edu to reserve a space at the training session.

Get help with Data Management Planning

http://library.duke.edu/data/guides/data-management/index.html

Data and GIS has launched a new guide that provides guidance for researchers looking for advice on data management plans now required by several granting agencies.  The guide provides examples of sample plans, key concepts involved in writing a plan, and contact information for groups on campus providing data management advice.  In addition, we offer individual consultations with researchers on data management planning.

New Collections for Fall 2012

http://library.duke.edu/data/collections/new.html

Contact Us! – askdata@duke.edu

 

Where There’s Smoke …

A team of Duke undergraduates participating in the Global Health Capstone course was awarded the “Outstanding Capstone Research Project” for their examination of state and congressional district characteristics that might influence the outcome of legislative efforts to raise cigarette excise taxes in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Mississippi.  Sarah Chapin and Gregory Morrison used GIS mapping tools in the Library’s Data & GIS Services Department to illuminate the relationships between county demographics and state legislators’ votes for or against cigarette tax hikes. Brian Clement, Alexa Monroy, and Katherine Roemer were other members of the research group.  Congratulations!

Regional Focus
The recent cigarette excise tax increases Mississippi (2009), North Carolina (2009), and South Carolina (2010) served as case studies from which to draw components of successful strategies to develop a regional legislative toolkit for those wishing to increase cigarette excise taxes in the Southeast.  In all of these states, the tax increase was controversial. The Southeast in general is tax averse, which presents a systemic challenge to those who advocate raising taxes on cigarettes.

Senate Votes & Poverty by CountyThe researchers examined state characteristics which might influence the outcome of efforts to raise excise taxes, such as coalitions for and against proposed increases, the facts each side brought to bear and the nature of the discourse mobilized by different groups, the economic impact in each state of both smoking and the proposed excise taxes, and local political realities. The students restricted the area of interest to the Southeast because this region has a shared history and, consequently, similar challenges when it comes to race, poverty, and rural populations. They are also, broadly speaking, politically similar and have had a similar experience with both tobacco use and government regulation.

This multi-disciplinary analysis provides a reference point for state legislators or interest groups wishing to pass cigarette tax increases.  The deliverable provided a model of past voting trends, suggestions for framing political dimensions of the issue, and strategies to overcome opposition in state legislatures.

Comparing Legislative Districts and County Data
Senate Votes & Party AffiliationThe bulk of the research involved mapping the political landscape surrounding cigarette tax legislation.  In doing so, researchers looked at voting records, interest group politics, campaigns, and state ideology. Broadly, the research entailed charting the electoral geography by overlaying state house and senate districts with county-level data.  Districts were coded based on voting history, party affiliation, smoking rates, and constituent demographics.  State legislature websites were used to find representatives’ voting histories, allowing the researchers to match legislators by county when constructing a GIS dataset.  County party affiliations are available through the state board of elections.  Finally, county demographics came from the 2010 Census data.

Senate Votes & Percent Black by County

Overcoming Ideology
Besides using GIS mapping to illustrate these relationships, the researchers analyzed the involvement of major interest groups, specifically, lobbying expenditures and campaign contributions to map the involvement of both pro- and anti-tobacco interest groups.  Additionally, they examined the impact of state ideology on the framing of political dimensions, looking at editorials, opinion pieces, newspapers, and committee markups, as well as interviews (both previous interviews and ones they conducted) with state legislators and interest groups.  Overcoming state ideology, both political and social, is a major factor in passing cigarette excise tax legislation, especially in a region with such dominant tobacco influence.

Again, the purpose of the research is not merely to understand the political landscapes surrounding the passage of cigarette tax bills, but to apply these findings to the creation of a legislative toolbox for representatives or interests groups concerned with pushing similar legislation.

Surveying Our Researchers

Understanding library users’ research goals remains a key element of the Perkins Library’s Strategic Plan.  As part of the Library’s User Studies Initiative, Teddy Gray surveyed the Biology Department in the Fall of 2010 to discover what tools and resources departmental members use in their research, researchers’ data management needs, and the impact of the BES Library closing in 2009.

DATA AND DATA MANAGEMENT IN BIOLOGY
From the 18 interviews of faculty, graduate students, postdocs, and lab managers, we learned–not surprisingly–that nearly all the interviewees use data in their research, most of which they generate themselves. Half incorporate data from others into their work with nearly a third using sequence data from GenBank. Out of the 12 interviewees who generate data in their labs, two-thirds archive their data in existing repositories.

In addition to the interviews, this survey also examined research articles produced by Duke Biologists from 2009 in which we paid special attention to their methods sections and citation patterns. From analyzing departmental research articles, we found out the nearly 40% of the authors deposited their research data into either GenBank or a journal archive. Only one author deposited data into another existing scientific repository. Again nearly 40% of the authors used a general statistical package in their work (SAS and R being the most popular), while nearly half used a biology-specific statistical tool.

THE (RISE?) PREVALENCE of R
Almost everyone interviewed uses statistical tools in their research with over half now using R. Many also use biology-specific statistical programs.

PRINT VERSUS ELECTRONIC
All but one of the interviewees prefer the online versions of library material over the print. A third use image databases–primarily Google Images–in their teaching and presentations; however, only one interviewee knew of subject specific image databases such as the Biology Image Library. And while some interviewees missed the convenience of easy shelf browsing with the BES Library so close by, all are happy with the daily document delivery to the building.

FINAL THOUGHTS
We are grateful to the Biology Department for their support (and time) in conducting this survey and plan to use the results as the basis for library services.  Data and GIS Services is always interested in hearing more from Duke researchers about the nature of your research! Please let us know if you would like to discuss your research interest and/or library needs.