Category Archives: Hartman Center

Commercials in the Classroom

How have TV commercials changed over time? The answer to part of that question is found in this video about AdViews. Five Duke undergraduates discuss their small group project using commercials found in AdViews as primary sources for a fall 2009 Markets & Management Studies class taught by George Grody.

Using AdViews, the students compared a number of historic 1960s and 1970s commercials with corresponding ones from today. The students analyzed commercials for Hardees, Schick, Bounce, Pledge, and perfume, finding both interesting similarities and drastic contrasts that reflect the branding strategies of each time period.

AdViews, a digital archive of over 8,000 vintage television commercials dating from the 1950s to the 1980s, is one of the newest resources available from the Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Hartman Center collects and provides access to commercials, print ads, books, and other documents chronicling the advertising and marketing of products from the mid 19th century to the present. Our staff also provides targeted presentations to a wide range of classes each semester, helping to integrate primary source material into subjects ranging from Anthropology to History to Visual Studies, and most anything in between. Students are able to discover not only how TV commercials have changed, but how advertising tracks the evolution of not only the ad industry but also of society itself.

If you are interested in learning more about AdViews, classroom presentations, or research assistance, please contact the Hartman Center Reference Archivist at hartman-center(at)duke.edu or 919-660-5827.

Post contributed by Lynn Eaton, Hartman Center Reference Archivist.

2010 Hartman Center Travel Grants Awarded

The John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History is pleased to announce the recipients of this year’s Hartman Center Travel Grants. These grants allow scholars to travel to Durham to conduct research using the Hartman Center’s collections.

JWT Fellows:

  • Ferdinando Fasce: Department of Modern and Contemporary History, University of Genoa
    “JWT Italy between Reconstruction and the First Oil Shock, from the late 1940s through the 1970s”
  • Eva von Wyl: Social and Economic History, University of Zurich
    “Rationalization, Self-Service and American Way of Life: American Eating Habits in Postwar Switzerland (1950-1970)”

Faculty Recipients:

  • Shannan Clark: Department of History, Montclair State University
    “The Creative Class: White-Collar Workers and the Making of America’s Culture of Consumer Capitalism”
  • Liza Featherstone: Journalism School, New York University; School of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University
    “Behind The Mirror: Focus Groups and What They Reveal, 1930s to present”
  • Michelle Ferranti: Division of Fine and Performing Arts, Marymont Manhattan College
    “History of Women’s Motivations for Douching following the Medicalization of Birth Control in the U.S.”
  • Ann McDonald: Department of Art Design, Northeastern University
    “The Role of Publically Displayed Information Visualization in Eliciting Individual and Communal Action”
  • Ari Martin Samsky: Global Health Studies Program, University of Iowa
    “Working Through Responsibility: Advertising, Medicine and The Social Good, World War II-the Present”

Student Recipients:

  • Abby Bartholomew: College of Journalism and Mass Communications, Advertising Department, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
    “JWT’s Application of Psychological Principles to Advertising, the Work of John B. Watson and his Behaviorist Theories”
  • Rebecca Burditt: Program in Visual and Cultural Studies, Department of Art and Art History, University of Rochester
    “Seeing Difference: Postwar Hollywood and the Commercial Delay”
  • Berti Kolbow: Institute for Economic and Social History, Georgia Augusta University Goettingen
    “Transatlantic Transfers of Marketing Concepts between Eastman Kodak and Agfa, 1880-1945”
  • Shawn Moura: Department of History, University of Maryland
    “Target Market Brazil: Postwar Advertising and Consumer Culture in the Country of the Future”
  • Cory Pillen: Department of Art History, University of Wisconsin-Madison
    “WPA Posters: A New Deal for Design, 1936-1943”
  • Elizabeth Spies: Department of English, University of California, Riverside
    “Advertising Stigmatas: The Evolution of Poetic Advertising throughout the Twentieth Century, 1890-1980”

Watch The Devil’s Tale for news about upcoming discussions with several of the travel grant recipients from the Hartman, Bingham, and Franklin Research Centers.

“You’ve Got . . . Personality: Testimonial and Celebrity Endorsement Advertisements”

Date: 8 April-30 June 2010
Location and Time: Rare Book Room cases during library hours
Contact Information: Jackie Reid, 919-660 5836 or j.reid(at)duke.edu

Testimonial advertisements, today seemingly reserved for fading actors, retired politicians, and late-night cable infomercials, were once a mark of innovation and prestige in advertising. This exhibit, a complement to “The Power of Refined Beauty: Photographing Society Women for Pond’s, 1920s-1950s,” highlights some examples of this style of advertising, as documented in the collections of the Hartman Center.

In 1923, JWT created a new advertising campaign for Pond’s creams, based on the testimonials of leading American society women and European titled nobility. That campaign lasted for over thirty years and is the focus of half of the exhibit. Newsletters, internal memos, publications, ads and other items allow the viewer a behind-the-scenes look at bringing a concept to fruition in a long-standing advertising campaign.

Taking a broader view, the other half of the exhibit documents an overview of the use of testimonials and celebrity endorsements in advertising for a range of products. From an 1893 endorsement by arctic explorer Lieutenant Peary for Kodak, to Count Basie for Camel cigarettes, to Coach K for American Express, a wide variety of well-known celebrities are shown endorsing products. Advertisements, reports, and memos illustrate advertisers’ belief that celebrity testimonials could lend products a feeling of familiarity and credibility, while also creating the illusion that to purchase a given product was to belong to an elite cast.

Post contributed by Jackie Reid, Director of the Hartman Center, and Lynn Eaton, Hartman Center Reference Archivist

“The Power of Refined Beauty: Photographing Society Women for Pond’s”

Date: 5 April-22 August 2010
Location and Time: Special Collections Gallery during library hours
Contact Information: Jackie Reid, 919-660 5836 or j.reid(at)duke.edu

Nadejda, Marchioness Milford Haven, n.d., by Edward Steichen. Photograph courtesy of the J. Walter Thompson Company Archives.

Nadejda Mikhailovna Romanov Mountbatten, Marchioness of Milford Haven, won a Charleston dance competition at Cannes in 1921 with the future King George VI.

Anne Tracy Morgan organized the American Fund for French Wounded, earning the Croix de Guerre and recognition from the French Legion of Honor.

Clare Josephine O’Brian Egerton, Duchess of Sutherland, lost $84,000 of jewels on the morning of Queen Elizabeth II’s coronation.

Along with other socialites, heiresses, and royalty from families such as the Vanderbilts and the Roosevelts, these women appeared in Pond’s socialite endorsement campaign, masterminded by the J. Walter Thompson Company. The Hartman Center‘s new exhibit,”The Power of Refined Beauty: Photographing Society Women for Pond’s, 1920s-1950s,” charts the course of this wildly-successful thirty-year campaign.

Adding to the prestige of the campaign, the women’s photographs were taken by distinguished fashion photographers such as Edward Steichen, Baron Adolph de Meyer, Louise Dahl-Wolfe, and Cecil Beaton.

A print catalog of these photographs will complement the exhibit. Please e-mail hartman-center(at)duke.edu to request a copy.

Hot Toddy Weather

What with all of the cold and the snow, RBMSCL folks have been craving warming beverages. Luckily, the Nicole Di Bona Peterson Collection of Advertising Cookbooks (which contains over 1800 cookbooks!) has come to our rescue. We thought we’d share this Hot Toddy recipe from Fine Cocktails Made Easy:

Place in 5 oz. glass: 2 cloves, 1 lump of sugar.

Add 2 oz. bourbon, rye, or blended whiskey.

Fill with hot water.

Stir.

Add thin slice of lemon.

Serve with a small spoon.

And, of course, please sled responsibly.

Now Accepting Travel Grant Applications

The RBMSCL is now accepting applications for our 2010-2011 travel grants. The Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History and Culture, the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture, and the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History will award up to $1,000 per recipient to fund travel and other expenses related to visiting the RBMSCL to use their collections. The grants are open to undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and independent scholars living outside a 50-mile radius from Durham, NC.

More details—and the grant application—may be found here. Applications must be postmarked no later than January 29, 2010. Recipients will be announced in March 2010.