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Meeting Data Management Plan Requirements

Monday, September 27, 1:00 PM
n/a

[Online] There are many federal and private funders who require data management plans as part of a grant application, including NIH who recently released a new Data Management and Sharing Policy that takes effect in 2023 and will apply to all grants. This workshop will cover the components of a data management plan, what makes a strong plan and how to adhere to it, and where to find guidance, tools, resources, and assistance for building funder-based plans. We will also discuss how to make data management plans actionable and meaningful living documents to support research integrity, reproducibility, reuse, and verification of results. This workshop is a collaboration of Duke University Libraries and the Office of Scientific Integrity. 

This workshop is eligible for the 200-level faculty and staff RCR. 

This event is offered virtually. A zoom link will be sent via email to registered participants to join the workshop.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published, please contact the instructor at any time prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

Data Management

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R for data science: visualization, pivot, join, regression

Monday, September 27, 2:00 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

[In-person] Part of the Rfun series. R and the Tidyverse are a data-first coding language that enables reproducible workflows. In this two-part workshop, you’ll learn the fundamentals of R, everything you need to know to quickly get started. You’ll learn about visualization using ggplot2, how to make interactive charts for use in dashboards, how to reshape and merge data, and be introduced to models.

Part 2 requires the familiarity of part 1.  By the end of part 2 you will have a familiarity with the grammar of graphics, be introduced to interactivity techniques, be able to invoke data joins and pivots, and gain an introduction to linear regression.

This workshop will be held in person in Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room), but may move to virtual depending on Duke Coronavirus policies, health or equipment considerations. Please watch your email for updates. All participants are required to follow current Duke Coronavirus policies to attend the workshop.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published, please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

Data Science

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"A Recipe for Daphne" Book Talk

Tuesday, September 28, 10:00 AM
None
Nektaria Anastasiadou's debut novel, A Recipe for Daphne, was published by Hoopoe, the fiction imprint of the American University in Cairo Press, in February 2021. Nektaria is the 2019 winner of the Zografeios Agon, a prestigious Greek literary award founded in nineteenth-century Constantinople. She is currently developing the winning short story into a novel written in the Istanbul Greek dialect. Nektaria speaks Greek, Turkish, English, French, Spanish, and Italian. She lives in Istanbul.
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Geospatial Data in R: Processing and Analysis

Tuesday, September 28, 10:00 AM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

[In-person] The R language has became a popular option for working with geospatial data. Compared to traditional GIS software, the code-driven approach of R can be more reproducible and efficient. This workshop give participants the skills to perform geospatial workflows entirely within R. We will discuss how different types of geospatial data work in R, walk through examples of data operations, and explore common analysis methods for geospatial data. 

This workshop is a companion to Geospatial Data in R: Mapping, which focuses on visualization more than analysis.

Attendees will need basic familiarity with R and RStudio to follow along with the exercises. Knowledge of tidyverse packages such as ggplot2 and dplyr is also helpful.

This workshop will be held in person in Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room), but may move to virtual depending on Duke Coronavirus policies, health or equipment considerations. Please watch your email for updates. All participants are required to follow current Duke Coronavirus policies to attend the workshop.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published, please contact the instructor at any time prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

Mapping & GIS, Data Science

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Online: Low Maintenance Book Club reads "Persepolis"

Tuesday, September 28, 12:00 PM
Other (see event description)
West Campus

To get in the back-to-school spirit, we’ll be reading and discussing Persepolis, a newer addition to many middle and high school reading lists. Marjane Satrapi’s graphic novel describes her experience growing up in Iran during the Islamic Revolution. As always, you’re welcome to join regardless of how much (or whether) you’ve read the book!

Low Maintenance Book Club reads Persepolis
Tuesday, September 28th, noon-1pm
Zoom (link to be sent the morning of meeting)

Copies of the book can be found at Duke University Libraries and at all local public libraries. Please RSVP to receive a Zoom link the morning of the meeting.

 

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Intro to QGIS

Thursday, September 30, 10:00 AM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

[In-person] Are you looking for an open source option for GIS to make maps or to analyze geospatial data? In this workshop we will demonstrate how to import and analyze data in QGIS and discuss the benefits of using QGIS over other GIS software. In the process, we'll go over some general GIS concepts such as layers, types of GIS files, and projections, with an emphasis on feature (vector) layers. This is an introductory class, and no prior GIS experience is needed.

This workshop will be held in person in Bostock Library (room 023, in the basement corridor leading to Perkins), but may move to virtual depending on Duke Coronavirus policies, health or equipment considerations. Please watch your email for updates. All participants are required to follow current Duke Coronavirus policies to attend the workshop.

There 15 computers available, and attendees are welcome to bring laptops if they've loaded necessary software. Attendees using their own computers should have installed QGIS beforehand.

  • Go to the QGIS Downloads webpage.
  • Download and install the QGIS Installer for either the latest version or the latest long-term (most stable) release, either 64-bit or 32-bit.  Versions for several platforms are available.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published, please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

Mapping & GIS

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ONLINE: Library toolbox for responsible research in the sciences and engineering

Friday, October 1, 9:30 AM
Other (see event description)
n/a

This interactive online workshop will introduce you to a variety of library resources to support your research practices. We’ll cover copyright and fair use, citation practices and avoiding plagiarism, research data management, and issues in scholarly publishing from an author’s perspective. You’ll meet library experts relevant to your discipline and leave the session informed on how to dig deeper and get individualized help when these topics arise in your graduate student career.


This workshop has been approved for two hours of RCR credit and is intended for new graduate students in engineering, natural sciences, and basic biomedical sciences. Zoom connection information will be sent via email to registered attendees on Friday, October 1st.

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Visualization in Python with Altair

Wednesday, October 6, 10:00 AM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

[In-person] While Python is my preferred programming language for scripted data transformations, I have avoided routinely doing data visualization in Python. I could follow examples for the many Python visualization libraries, but in the end they all seemed confusing and made it hard to do the types of exploratory visualization that Tableau made easy. Finally, Altair has emerged as a viable alternative for me, because of the way it "thinks about" data and the visualization process.

Altair is a declarative statistical visualization library for Python, built on top of the well-design and powerful Vega-Lite visualization grammar. (Vega-lite was built for the web, includes interaction, and is being adopted as a standard by high profile websites and tools.) It works well for small to medium-sized tabular data (like spreadsheets). 

In this workshop, I’ll run you through both some introductory and some more complex examples using Altair with Python in Jupyter notebooks, so you can get a feeling for how you might use it in your own work. 

Note: This is an introductory workshop on Altair, but you’ll probably be more comfortable following along if you have at least a little bit of experience using the Python programming language, since I won’t be spending time on the language itself. (Feel free to sign up no matter what your experience level, but past students with no Python or programming experience have found it too confusing to be useful.) 

Bring a computer if you can!

We hope there will be some computers in the training room with Python installed, but if you have a laptop with recent (from the past six months) versions of Python, Jupyter Lab and Altair installed, that will lessen the chance that you’ll have to share machines. Instructions are below.

Anaconda Python distribution (Individual Edition): 
https://www.anaconda.com/products/individual

I strongly recommend that you install the Anaconda Python Distribution to use in class. In principle, if you have something above Python 3.7 or so, plus all the necessary modules, everything should work fine. But, the Anaconda Distribution is packaged nicely, can be installed without admin privileges, and comes with everything you’ll need. If you have another version of Python already installed and you’re going to install Anaconda, it’s best to uninstall the other version first. It can get to be a mess if you have multiple versions of Python installed on one machine. 

  • Go to the link above, hit Download, and choose the version for your operating system. I would recommend to just install for “yourself”, not for all users of the machine, since that way it will install everything in your Users/username folder and doesn’t require admin privileges. 
  • If you’re on Mac and aren’t comfortable with shell scripts on the command line, choose the Graphical Installer. 
  • On Windows, I would choose the 64-bit installer, unless you know you’re still running a 32-bit version of Windows on an older machine. 
  • If you’re sticking with your non-Anaconda version of Python, make sure you have JupyterLab, Pandas, Altair, and all of their respective dependencies installed.

Please try to launch Python and JupyterLab before class to make sure they’re working! JupyterLab can be started from the Anaconda Navigator application, or from the Anaconda Prompt (Windows) or a Terminal (Mac) by typing (without quotes) “jupyter lab” and hitting return. From a Python notebook or an interactive Python prompt, you can test out the main modules you’ll need by typing this and executing the code cell:

import pandas as pd
import altair as alt

This workshop will be held in person in the Bostock 023 Training Room, but may move to virtual depending on Duke Coronavirus policies, health or equipment considerations. Please watch your email for updates. All participants are required to follow current Duke Coronavirus policies to attend the workshop.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published, please contact the instructor at any time prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

Data Visualization

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Mapping in Tableau

Thursday, October 7, 10:00 AM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

[In-person] Tableau is a software package that is increasingly popular for creating striking visualizations, such as charts and graphs, from tabular data. It also has an increasing number of capabilities to create maps. Source data can include native geospatial files (such as shapefiles or GeoJSON files), but also tabular data (such as CSV or Excel files) that include locational values, such as place names or coordinate data. This workshop will cover how to create maps in Tableau and on ways to manipulate the data and to effectively symbolize it on a map.

Please see this blog post for some background on mapping using Tableau.

The workshop will be held in person in Bostock Library (room 023, in the basement corridor leading to Perkins), but may move to virtual depending on Duke Coronavirus policies, health or equipment considerations. Please watch your email for updates. All participants are required to follow current Duke Coronavirus policies to attend the workshop.

There are 15 computers available, and attendees are welcome to bring laptops if they've loaded necessary software. If you're using your own computer, you need to have Tableau installed before the class. You can install Tableau for free as a university student: https://www.tableau.com/academic/students .  

The content of the workshop may be recorded. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published, please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

Mapping & GIS, Data Visualization

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Introduction: Preparing Data for Publishing

Wednesday, October 13, 1:00 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

[In-person] In this workshop participants will learn strategies for how to prepare data for publishing by “curating” an example dataset and identifying common data issues. Participants will also learn about the overall role of data repositories within the data sharing landscape and apply strategies for locating and assessing repositories. The workshop will include short lectures and group work via break-out rooms. As data sharing is increasingly required by journals and funders, this workshop will help early career researchers build the skills necessary to make their data FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable).

This workshop contains the same material as the previously offered “RDM 201: How and where to publish your data” workshop offered in previous semesters - participants who have attended this previous workshop should not attend.

This workshop (GS717.05) is eligible for 2 hours of Graduate School RCR Credit. 

This workshop will be held in person in the Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room), but may move to virtual depending on Duke Coronavirus policies, health or equipment considerations. Please watch your email for updates. All participants are required to follow current Duke Coronavirus policies to attend the workshop.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published, please contact the instructor at any time prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

Data Management

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Intro to Gephi for Network Visualization

Thursday, October 21, 10:00 AM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

[In-person] Networks (or graphs) are a compelling way of studying relationships between people, places, object, ideas, etc. Generating network data and visualizations, however, can be an involved and unintuitive process requiring specialized tools. This workshop will explore some of the easier ways to produce, load, and visualize network data using Gephi, an open source, multi-platform network analysis and visualization application.

No previous experience with Gephi or network data is requried. In this workshop you will get hands-on experience with an easy network data format and visualizing with the Gephi software.

Bring a computer if you can!

We hope there will be some computers in the training room with Gephi installed, but if you have a laptop with a recent (from the past six months) versions of Gephi installed, that will lessen the chance that you’ll have to share machines. Gephi can be downloaded from https://gephi.org/ for Windows, Mac and Linux. Please try to launch the program at least a day before the workshop begins.

This workshop will be held in person in the Bostock 023, but may move to virtual depending on Duke Coronavirus policies, health or equipment considerations. Please watch your email for updates. All participants are required to follow current Duke Coronavirus policies to attend the workshop.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published, please contact the instructor at any time prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

Data Visualization

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Advanced: Preparing Data for Publishing

Tuesday, October 26, 1:00 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

[In-person] This workshop will explore strategies and best practices for sharing and publishing data to support open science, reproducibility, and future innovation. Topics covered will include the use of data and metadata standards to support interoperability and harmonization. An overview of repository options and examples of disciplinary repositories will be explored as well as methods to publish data to increase the impact of research projects. Participants will also engage in discussions regarding how academia and communities can develop policies, norms, and procedures that enable data sharing in line with the FAIR Guiding Principles (i.e., Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable).

This workshop is eligible for the 200-level faculty and staff RCR. 

This workshop will be held in person in Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room), but may move to virtual depending on Duke Coronavirus policies, health or equipment considerations. Please watch your email for updates. All participants are required to follow current Duke Coronavirus policies to attend the workshop.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published, please contact the instructor at any time prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

Data Management

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Artist Talk, Gallery Viewing, and Book Signing: The Pretend Villages: Photographs by Christopher Sims

Thursday, November 4, 6:00 PM
Perkins 217, Rubenstein Library Photography Gallery
West Campus

Join us for an artist talk and gallery viewing for the opening event of the photography exhibit in the Rubenstein Library, The Pretend Villages: Photographs by Christopher Sims.

The exhibit documents the inhabitants and structures of imagined, fabricated Iraqi and Afghan villages on the training grounds of U.S. military bases. Situated in the deep forests of North Carolina and Louisiana and in a great expanse of desert near Death Valley in California, these villages serve as strange and poignant way stations for soldiers headed off to war, and for those who have fled from it: American troops encounter actors, often recent immigrants from Iraq and Afghanistan, who are paid to be “cultural role players.” Christopher Sims photographed these surprising and fantastical realms from 2005 to 2018 as U.S. wars abroad fluctuated in intensity. With this book, he presents an archival record of “enemy” village life that is as convincingly accurate and comically misdirected as it is mundane and nightmarish.

Christopher Sims is an Associate Professor of the Practice in the Sanford School of Public Policy and the Undergraduate Education Director at the Center for Documentary Studies.

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Designing a Reproducible Workflow with R and GitHub

Tuesday, November 9, 10:00 AM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

[In-person] Part of the Rfun series. The importance of reproducibility, replication, and transparency in the research endeavor is increasingly discussed in academia. This workshop will introduce foundational strategies that can increase the reproducibility of your work and present a potential end-to-end reproducible workflow using a suite of tools, including git, RStudio, Binder, and Zenodo. Configuration for the hands-on portion of the workshop will be sent to participants one week before the workshop. Participants are expected to bring their laptop already configured for the workshop. 

Prerequisites:

  • Introductory familiarity with R (consider attending an Introduction to R workshop or watch a prerecorded workshop)

  • A GitHub account

This workshop will be held in person in Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room), but may move to virtual depending on Duke Coronavirus policies, health or equipment considerations. Please watch your email for updates. All participants are required to follow current Duke Coronavirus policies to attend the workshop.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published, please contact the instructor at any time prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

Data Science, Data Management

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