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Introduction to Web Mapping

Tuesday, January 28, 10:00 AM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

This introductory workshop will teach you how to easily build interactive, online maps. We will start by discussing general mapping concepts and technologies related to web mapping. For the rest of the workshop, we will go through step-by-step tutorials for ArcGIS Online, a web-based mapping platform. Topics include making online maps from tabular data, creating and styling maps, publishing web applications, and using basic spatial analysis tools.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Rstudio Conference Pre-Conference Welcome (2020 Rstudio Conference Livestream)

Wednesday, January 29, 11:00 AM
Rubenstein Library 249 (Carpenter Conference Room)
West Campus

Join your Duke colleagues to watch a live stream of the 2020 Rstudio Conference featuring a data science panel. Lunch will provided at 11:30 for those who register in advance.

Abstract

This live-streamed pre-conference session will feature short interviews with staff from RStudio as well as the wider R-Community. During this event the attendees at the watch parties will have an opportunity to interact with the host and guests in real time. The pre-conference event will lead directly into the keynote and session live-streams.

Full Details on the Duke RStudio Conference 2020 Livestream

more information »

Open Source Software for Data Science (2020 Rstudio Conference Livestream)

Wednesday, January 29, 12:00 PM
Rubenstein Library 249 (Carpenter Conference Room)
West Campus

Join your Duke colleagues to watch a live stream of the 2020 Rstudio Conference featuring a keynote by J.J. Allaire (Founder and CEO of RStudio). Lunch will provided at 11:30 for those who register.

Keynote Abstract:
Open-source software is fundamentally necessary to ensure that the tools of data science are broadly accessible, and to provide a reliable and trustworthy foundation for reproducible research. This talk will delve into why open source software is so important and discuss the role of corporations as stewards of open source software. I'll also talk about how RStudio is structured and organized to pursue its mission of creating open source software for data science.

Full Details on the Duke RStudio Conference 2020 Livestream

more information »

Data, visualization, and designing with AI (2020 RStudio Conference Livestream)

Wednesday, January 29, 1:00 PM
Rubenstein Library 249 (Carpenter Conference Room)
West Campus

Join your Duke colleagues to watch a live stream of the 2020 Rstudio Conference featuring a keynote by Fernanda Viegas (Google) and Martin Wattenberg (Google).

Keynote Abstract:

Recent progress in machine learning has raised a series of urgent questions: How can we train and debug deep learning models? How can we understand what is going on inside a neural network? And, perhaps most important, how can we design systems that serve people best? We'll show a series of examples from the People+AI Research (PAIR) initiative at Google--ranging from data visualizations for researchers, to tools for medical practitioners, to guidelines for designers--that illustrate how thinking carefully about data can lead to better tools, more effective design, and help humans and AI work together.

Full Details on the Duke RStudio Conference 2020 Livestream

more information »

Research Data Management 101 for Social Scientists

Wednesday, January 29, 1:00 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Social scientists work with lots of data in their research, be it qualitative or quantitative, primary or secondary. This workshop will introduce data management practices for social scientists to consider and apply throughout the research lifecycle. Good data management practices pertaining to planning, organization, documentation, storage and backup, sharing, citation, and preservation will be presented through a social sciences lens using discipline-based, concrete examples. During the workshop, participants will also engage in discussions with their peers on data management concepts as well as learn about one specific tool as a method to assess how tools can enable specific data management practices. The tool explored in this workshop will be OSF - a comprehensive data and project management workflow tool.

While good general data management practices are relevant across disciplines, participants working specifically within the social sciences are the intended audience for this workshop.

This workshop is eligible for 2 hours of Graduate School RCR Credits.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Research Data Management 101 for Social Scientists

Wednesday, January 29, 1:00 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Social scientists work with lots of data in their research, be it qualitative or quantitative, primary or secondary. This workshop will introduce data management practices for social scientists to consider and apply throughout the research lifecycle. Good data management practices pertaining to planning, organization, documentation, storage and backup, sharing, citation, and preservation will be presented through a social sciences lens using discipline-based, concrete examples. During the workshop, participants will also engage in discussions with their peers on data management concepts as well as learn about one specific tool as a method to assess how tools can enable specific data management practices. The tool explored in this workshop will be OSF - a comprehensive data and project management workflow tool.

While good general data management practices are relevant across disciplines, participants working specifically within the social sciences are the intended audience for this workshop.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Intro to QGIS

Thursday, January 30, 10:00 AM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

Are you looking for an open source option for GIS to make maps or to analyze geospatial data? In this workshop we will demonstrate how to import and analyze data in QGIS and discuss the benefits of using QGIS over other GIS software. In the process, we'll go over some general GIS concepts such as layers, types of GIS files, and projections, with an emphasis on feature (vector) layers. This is an introductory class, and no prior GIS experience is needed.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Object of type ‘closure’ is not subsettable (2020 RStudio Conference Livestream)

Thursday, January 30, 12:00 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Join your Duke colleagues to watch a live stream of the 2020 Rstudio Conference featuring a keynote by Jenny Bryan (Software Engineer, RStudio). Lunch will provided at 11:30 for those who register.

Keynote Abstract:
Your first “object of type ‘closure’ is not subsettable” error message is a big milestone for an R user. Congratulations, if there was any lingering doubt, you now know that you are officially programming! Programming involves considerably more troubleshooting and debugging than many of us expected (or signed up for). The ability to solve your own problems is an incredibly powerful stealth skill that is worth cultivating with intention. This talk will help you nurture your inner problem solver, covering both general debugging methods and specific ways to implement them in the R ecosystem.

Full Details on the Duke RStudio Conference 2020 Livestream

more information »

Grade Faster and Easier with Gradescope

Thursday, January 30, 12:00 PM
Bostock 039
West Campus

Just in time for your upcoming midterms, join Learning Innovation and the Gradescope team to learn how to use Gradescope to dramatically reduce the pain and time associated with grading exams and homework, while providing better and faster feedback to your students. Duke faculty who use Gradescope report that it saves them significant time, increases their consistency in grading and provides a welcome way to manage and track the grading process.

In the workshop you will learn how to:

  • Grade your existing exams and homework on Gradescope,
  • Grade groups of answers at once,
  • Make rubric changes as you grade - changes apply to previously graded work to maintain consistency,
  • Write each comment only once - apply previously used comments with a click,
  • Create better rubrics to increase student learning,
  • Use 'assignment analytics' to gain insight into student learning.

Note: lunch will be provided for those able to join us in Bostock 039, but this workshop can also be attended virtually through Zoom videoconferencing. When you register, let us know how you plan to attend.

more information »

Ciompi Quartet Lunchtime Classics

Thursday, January 30, 12:00 PM
Rubenstein Library Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room 153
The Ciompi Quartet and students in the Duke Chamber Music Program present a free, noontime concert of chamber works with discussion and commentary. The Ciompi Quartet was founded at Duke University in 1965 by the renowned Italian violinist Giorgio Ciompi. All its members are professors at Duke and play a leading role in its cultural life, in addition to traveling widely throughout the year for performances. In a career that includes many hundreds of concerts and spans five continents, the Ciompi Quartet has developed a reputation for performances of real intelligence and musical sophistication, and for a warm, unified sound that is enhanced by each player's strong individual voice. This concert is presented in association with Duke University Libraries.

more information »

Visualization in R using ggplot2

Thursday, January 30, 1:00 PM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

Part of the Rfun learning series

Data science skills are increasingly important for research and industry projects. With complex data science projects, however, come complex needs for understanding and communicating analysis processes and results. Ultimately, an analyst's data science toolbox is incomplete without visualization skills. Incorporating effective visualizations directly into the analysis tool you are using can facilitate quick data exploration, streamline your research process, and improve the reproducibility of your research.

In this workshop we will focus on ggplot2, a library for R that creates clear and well-designed visualizations and that plays well with other tidyverse packages. While prior experience with ggplot2 and with other tidyverse packages is not required, some basic familiarity with R is expected. Please consider attending (or viewing a recording of) our Introduction to R workshop before attending this workshop on ggplot2.

In this workshop, we will use RStudio and RMarkdown files for all exercises. You may use the in-room computers, but if you prefer to bring your own laptop, but please make sure you come with RStudio and the tidyverse package installed. You may also want to install the knitr package to be able to compile the entire Rmarkdown file. A previous version of this workshop has been recorded, and the associated files are available on GitHub.

Please note: this classroom has a limited number of seats. If you choose to register for the workshop, please make every effort to attend, or if you cannot, please cancel your registration as soon as a conflict comes up. If all spots fill up, we will maintain a waitlist in the event of cancelations. If you can't attend but would like to be notified when a recording is available, please contact Angela Zoss.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

NSSD Episode 100 (2020 RStudio Conference Livestream)

Thursday, January 30, 7:00 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Watch a live stream of the 2020 Rstudio Conference featuring a keynote by Roger Peng (Professor of Biostatistics at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health) and Hillary Parker (Data Scientist at Stitch Fix).

Keynote Abstract:
In episode 100 of Not So Standard Deviations, the first ever episode prepared in advance, Hilary and Roger discuss creativity, its role in data science, and how it can be fostered through conversation.

Full Details on the Duke RStudio Conference 2020 Livestream

more information »

R Open Lab: semi-structured opportunities for learning R

Monday, February 3, 6:00 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Part of the Rfun learning series

Come once or come each week: This six-week, semi-guided hour provides a safe and comfortable environment for learning more about the R programming language, RStudio, and the Tidyverse. The curriculum is based on the Master the Tidyverse workshop. The series goal is to enable researchers and students a low-stress hour to hone your own data savvy skills. Attendees will gain greater familiarity with a tool-suite designed to foster reproducibility and transparency vital for the researcher's workflow.

In the first meeting we will introduce R, RStudio and the Tidyverse as well as outline several self-directed learning resources (below). Follow and join any of the the remining weekly sessions. Each week covers a new topic in the Master the Tidyverse series. Reinforcement is on-your-own through self-directed resources. Assignments are optional. Intermediate and advanced users will, optionally, design your own curriculum and benefit from interacting and supporting a helpful network of campus R users.

Event Dates are all on Mondays: Jan. 13, Feb. 3, Feb. 10, Feb. 17, Feb. 24, March 2.

See our FAQ for more information.

NOTE: Bring your laptop. The Edge Workshop Room does not provide computers.

NOTE 2: If you need help configuring your laptop for this workshop, come to the DVS Walk-In Hours before the workshop: Wednesdays between 1-3pm. (Floor Map for Bostock Library > 1st Floor > Brandaleone Lab for Data and Visualization Services.)

more information »

Python for Data Science: Pandas 102

Tuesday, February 4, 10:00 AM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

Python can be a great option for exploration, analysis and visualization of tabular data, such as spreadsheets and CSV files, if you know which tools to use and how to get started. This workshop will take you through some practical examples of using Python and specifically the Pandas module to load data from files and transform it into a standard “tidy” format, so it's ready to analyze and visualize. You will also get some experience working in JupyterLab, the exciting new flexible programming environment which contain Jupyter Notebooks, a file browser, and more.

This workshop builds upon, and is a continuation of, the very basic Pandas workshop I gave last semester (Fall 2019):

  • While none of the content will be very advanced, if you don't have any programming experience, or you have never used Python at all before, the material may be too confusing to be useful – I won't be teaching the language itself.
  • If you have at least a tiny bit of Python exposure, but haven't used Pandas much or at all, I would advise watching last semester's Intro to Pandas video before you attend.

The classroom in which this is held has Windows computers with Python and Pandas installed, so you don't need to bring a laptop.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Digital Brown Bag | "Why Don't You Just Make a Map?" When Digital Projects are Part of the Writing Process

Wednesday, February 5, 12:00 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Just make a map. Seems simple enough, right? That’s what Ashton Merck thought when, while writing her third dissertation chapter, she decided to create a series of maps and charts in an attempt to answer two of her research questions. And then the resulting visualizations changed the argument of her chapter.

In this Digital Brown Bag talk Ashton (History doctoral candidate) describes the work involved in this deceptively simple data visualization project as a jumping-off point for a bigger conversation about the possibilities and pitfalls associated with constructing original datasets as part of a larger project, or even as part of the research and writing process. What happens when seemingly simple research questions get out of hand? How will you know whether the labor of gathering the information will even be worth it in the end? When and how should you make peace with your “messy,” incomplete data? What are the limits of OCR and automation in constructing datasets? And will anyone accept your findings as valid?

more information »

Paper Maps for Digital Projects

Thursday, February 6, 1:00 PM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

Do you want to incorporate paper maps into a digital project? Overlaying scanned maps can help illustrate change over time, offer additional context, provide a visually appropriate background, and give access to spatial data not available in other formats.

This workshop will teach you how to bring paper maps into modern GIS applications. We will cover concepts and techniques related to georeferencing, the process of aligning map images with the correct locations on the earth. We will also create new GIS data by extracting features from scanned maps. Tutorials will present steps in several desktop and web-based tools. In addition to learning the software, we will discuss some challenges of working with historical maps.

Prior experience with desktop GIS software is helpful but not required. If you have no experience with GIS, we encourage you to attend Introduction to ArcGIS Pro or QGIS prior to this workshop.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

VFF: From Page to Text to Data

Friday, February 7, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
A page - whether from a manuscript or in printed form - has more information than its text. How can this information be thought about for quantification and visualization? Visualization of knowledge has deep roots in the practices of the High Middle Ages and the Renaissance, where forms of visualization and page organization could be as contentious as the conceptual "content" they represented. In this talk, I will focus on the problem of extracting "data" from pre-modern works for visualization and analysis. I am particularly concerned with how humanistic analysis can be thoughtful about the "datafication" of narrative without shying away from the insight that can be gained from visualizations.

more information »

R Open Lab: semi-structured opportunities for learning R

Monday, February 10, 6:00 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Part of the Rfun learning series

Come once or come each week: This six-week, semi-guided hour provides a safe and comfortable environment for learning more about the R programming language, RStudio, and the Tidyverse. The curriculum is based on the Master the Tidyverse workshop. The series goal is to enable researchers and students a low-stress hour to hone your own data savvy skills. Attendees will gain greater familiarity with a tool-suite designed to foster reproducibility and transparency vital for the researcher's workflow.

In the first meeting we will introduce R, RStudio and the Tidyverse as well as outline several self-directed learning resources (below). Follow and join any of the the remining weekly sessions. Each week covers a new topic in the Master the Tidyverse series. Reinforcement is on-your-own through self-directed resources. Assignments are optional. Intermediate and advanced users will, optionally, design your own curriculum and benefit from interacting and supporting a helpful network of campus R users.

Event Dates are all on Mondays: Jan. 13, Feb. 3, Feb. 10, Feb. 17, Feb. 24, March 2.

See our FAQ for more information.

NOTE: Bring your laptop. The Edge Workshop Room does not provide computers.

NOTE 2: If you need help configuring your laptop for this workshop, come to the DVS Walk-In Hours before the workshop: Wednesdays between 1-3pm. (Floor Map for Bostock Library > 1st Floor > Brandaleone Lab for Data and Visualization Services.)

more information »

Deconstructing Digital Scholarship (RCR Workshop)

Wednesday, February 12, 10:00 AM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

This workshop will help graduate students across the disciplines, but primarily in the humanities and social sciences, evaluate digital scholarly publications on the web. Students will acquire skills that will allow them to evaluate scholarly aspects of digital scholarly publications, appropriately cite those publications in their work, and understand how to credit the work of other contributors in their own digital works. Students will explore digital scholarly publications through hands-on activities and discuss and reflect on best practices. This workshop will be led by Liz Milewicz, co-director of the ScholarWorks Center, and Arianne Hartsell-Gundy, Head of the Humanities Section at Duke University Libraries.

more information »

Mapping with R

Wednesday, February 12, 1:00 PM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

R has become a popular and reproducible option for supporting spatial and statistical analysis. This hands-on workshop will demonstrate how to plot x/y coordinates; how to generate thematic chloropleths with US Census and other federal data; import GIS shapefiles; and create interactive maps on the web. The focus will be on mapping (making a visual). Please see the schedule for related workshops the following week: one that focuses on geospatial analysis using R, and one that showcases some of the analysis that you can do with programmic tools such as R and Python.

Prerequisites:

NOTE: If you bring your laptop, you may optionally follow steps below to prepare (although R & RStudio are installed on lab computers).

  1. Use a cloud version of R, or install R & RStudio in advance (instructions)
  2. Install the tidyverse, tidycensus, tigris, and sf packages in advance (instructions)

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Digital Scholarship Open House

Thursday, February 13, 12:00 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

At its annual open house Duke University Libraries’ Digital Scholarship Services department showcases some of its work over the past year. This year’s slate of speakers and projects offers a view into what it means to create public-oriented digital scholarship -- from considering the interests of collaborators in how the scholarship is shared, to ensuring the scholarship reaches audiences most likely to benefit from it, to using audience feedback and needs to drive future work. Whether you are just interested in learning more about digital scholarship, publishing, and public scholarship, or planning to start your own publishing project, join us for lunch and conversation with this cross-disciplinary panel as they discuss the motivations behind their projects, the people and work involved in realizing it, and the insights and skills gained along the way.

  • Joella Bitter (Doctoral candidate in Cultural Anthropology)

  • David Johnston (Associate Professor of the Practice of Marine Conservation Ecology, Nicholas School of the Environment)

  • Elizabeth Schrader (Doctoral candidate in Early Christianity, Department of Religion)

  • Nicholas Smolenski (Doctoral candidate in Musicology, Department of Music)

Sponsored by Duke Libraries’ Digital Scholarship and Publishing Services, with special thanks to the Office of Copyright and Scholarly Communications and ScholarWorks: A Center for Scholarly Publishing at Duke University Libraries.

event image

more information »

Introduction to R: the data science Tidyverse

Friday, February 14, 10:00 AM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Part of the Rfun learning series

A gentle introduction to R and the Tidyverse. This suite of data savvy tools and techniques enable flexible reporting via literate programing as a means to achieve reproducible and transparent analysis.

The workshop begins with a measured and deliberate orientation to the RStudio interface. Participants will import data (readr). We continue with a step-by-step approach to transform and wrangle data (dplyr). Finally, we introduce basic exploratory data analysis (EDA.) Participants can expect explanation, demonstration and code examples along with hands-on learning.

This workshop is part of the Rfun learning series: "R We Having Fun Yet‽". Learn more at https://rfun.library.duke.edu/

NOTE: Bring your laptop. The Edge Workshop Room does not provide computers.

NOTE 2: If you need help configuring your laptop for this workshop, come to the DVS Walk-In Hours before the workshop: Wednesdays between 1-3pm. (Floor Map for Bostock Library > 1st Floor > Brandaleone Lab for Data and Visualization Services.)

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

R Open Lab: semi-structured opportunities for learning R

Monday, February 17, 6:00 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Part of the Rfun learning series

Come once or come each week: This six-week, semi-guided hour provides a safe and comfortable environment for learning more about the R programming language, RStudio, and the Tidyverse. The curriculum is based on the Master the Tidyverse workshop. The series goal is to enable researchers and students a low-stress hour to hone your own data savvy skills. Attendees will gain greater familiarity with a tool-suite designed to foster reproducibility and transparency vital for the researcher's workflow.

In the first meeting we will introduce R, RStudio and the Tidyverse as well as outline several self-directed learning resources (below). Follow and join any of the the remining weekly sessions. Each week covers a new topic in the Master the Tidyverse series. Reinforcement is on-your-own through self-directed resources. Assignments are optional. Intermediate and advanced users will, optionally, design your own curriculum and benefit from interacting and supporting a helpful network of campus R users.

Event Dates are all on Mondays: Jan. 13, Feb. 3, Feb. 10, Feb. 17, Feb. 24, March 2.

See our FAQ for more information.

NOTE: Bring your laptop. The Edge Workshop Room does not provide computers.

NOTE 2: If you need help configuring your laptop for this workshop, come to the DVS Walk-In Hours before the workshop: Wednesdays between 1-3pm. (Floor Map for Bostock Library > 1st Floor > Brandaleone Lab for Data and Visualization Services.)

more information »

Visualization in R using ggplot2

Tuesday, February 18, 1:30 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Part of the Rfun learning series

In this workshop we will focus on ggplot2, a library for R that creates clear and well-designed visualizations and that plays well with other tidyverse packages. Prior experience with ggplot2 and the tidyverse is not required, although basic familiarity is expected. Please consider attending (or viewing a recording of) our Introduction to R workshop before attending this workshop on ggplot2.

Bring your own Laptop with R, RStudio, and the Tidyverse pre-installed.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Research Data Management 101 for Humanists

Wednesday, February 19, 10:00 AM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Humanists work with various media, content and materials (sources) as part of their research. These sources can be considered data. This workshop will introduce data management practices for humanities scholars to consider and apply throughout the research lifecycle. Good data management practices pertaining to planning, organization, documentation, storage and backup, sharing, citation, and preservation will be presented through a humanities lens with discipline-based, concrete examples. During the workshop, participants will also engage in discussions with their peers on data management concepts as well as learn about one specific tool as a method to assess how tools can enable specific data management practices. The tool explored in this workshop will be Tropy - an open source image management tool.

While general good data management practices are relevant across disciplines, participants working specifically within the humanities are the intended audience for this workshop.

This workshop is eligible for 2 hours of Graduate School RCR Credits.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Research Data Management 101 for Humanists

Wednesday, February 19, 10:00 AM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Humanists work with various media, content and materials (sources) as part of their research. These sources can be considered data. This workshop will introduce data management practices for humanities scholars to consider and apply throughout the research lifecycle. Good data management practices pertaining to planning, organization, documentation, storage and backup, sharing, citation, and preservation will be presented through a humanities lens with discipline-based, concrete examples. During the workshop, participants will also engage in discussions with their peers on data management concepts as well as learn about one specific tool as a method to assess how tools can enable specific data management practices. The tool explored in this workshop will be Tropy - an open source image management tool.

While general good data management practices are relevant across disciplines, participants working specifically within the humanities are the intended audience for this workshop.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Digital Brown Bag

Wednesday, February 19, 12:00 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

[specific event information forthcoming]

more information »

Spatial Analysis with R

Wednesday, February 19, 1:00 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Do you already use R and want to learn more about working with geospatial data? You don’t necessarily need GIS software. Often you can analyze your data and make maps entirely in R.

In this workshop we will introduce methods for processing and analyzing geospatial data in R. We will talk about how different types of spatial data work in R, walk though common spatial data operations such joins, and perform basic spatial analysis.

This workshop is a companion to Mapping in R, which focus on visualization more than analysis.

We assume participants will have some familiarity with R and RStudio. If you are brand new to R, we suggest attending (or watching a recording of) our Intro to R workshop first. Basic knowledge of GIS concepts is helpful.

Please bring a laptop to follow along with the tutorials.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Data Science Tools Showcase: Spatial Analysis with R and Python

Thursday, February 20, 3:00 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Some people who want to do spatial (geographic) analysis don’t know ArcPro or QGIS, but do know R or Python. In this workshop, we will present a command-line, or code-driven, approach to working with geospatial data. This method offers several advantages over traditional GIS software that can make your work easier, faster, and more reproducible!

We will share a showcase of spatial data science workflows that demonstrate the possibilities opened up by tools available from the command-line and scripting for processing, analyzing and visualizing data.

This workshop would be helpful for participants with some GIS experience who want to expand their data science toolkit, or for those who currently use R and/or Python and are curious about the geospatial capabilities of these languages.

Some basic familiarity with programming in R and/or Python will make this workshop more useful. We encourage anyone without this background to attend (or watch a recording of) our Introduction to R or Python for Data Science workshops.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

R Open Lab: semi-structured opportunities for learning R

Monday, February 24, 6:00 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Part of the Rfun learning series

Come once or come each week: This six-week, semi-guided hour provides a safe and comfortable environment for learning more about the R programming language, RStudio, and the Tidyverse. The curriculum is based on the Master the Tidyverse workshop. The series goal is to enable researchers and students a low-stress hour to hone your own data savvy skills. Attendees will gain greater familiarity with a tool-suite designed to foster reproducibility and transparency vital for the researcher's workflow.

In the first meeting we will introduce R, RStudio and the Tidyverse as well as outline several self-directed learning resources (below). Follow and join any of the the remining weekly sessions. Each week covers a new topic in the Master the Tidyverse series. Reinforcement is on-your-own through self-directed resources. Assignments are optional. Intermediate and advanced users will, optionally, design your own curriculum and benefit from interacting and supporting a helpful network of campus R users.

Event Dates are all on Mondays: Jan. 13, Feb. 3, Feb. 10, Feb. 17, Feb. 24, March 2.

See our FAQ for more information.

NOTE: Bring your laptop. The Edge Workshop Room does not provide computers.

NOTE 2: If you need help configuring your laptop for this workshop, come to the DVS Walk-In Hours before the workshop: Wednesdays between 1-3pm. (Floor Map for Bostock Library > 1st Floor > Brandaleone Lab for Data and Visualization Services.)

more information »

Git, GitHub & version control

Wednesday, February 26, 10:00 AM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Version control enables single authors or group collaborators to create and share project timelines, transparently tell the story of a project, manage collaboration, experiment with alternative options, and create back-up repositories. Git is one of the dominant, open-source, version control applications. GitHub is social coding and project cloud tool fed by a git remote.

Come learn how all this works and create your own "Hello World" GitHub repository.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Mapping in Tableau

Wednesday, February 26, 1:00 PM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

Tableau is a software package that is increasingly popular for creating striking visualizations, such as charts and graphs, from tabular data. It also has an increasing number of capabilities to create maps. Source data can include native geospatial files (such as shapefiles or GeoJSON files), but also tabular data (such as CSV or Excel files) that include locational values, such as place names or coordinate data. This workshop will cover how to create maps in Tableau and on ways to manipulate the data and to effectively symbolize it on a map.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Radio Haïti-Inter: Three Decades of Resistance

Thursday, February 27, 12:00 AM
Rubenstein Arts Center, Studio 129
Radio Haïti-Inter: Three Decades of Resistance, both an exhibit and immersive audio experience, coincides with the Duke Performances premiere of Breaking the Thermometer to Hide the Fever and the twentieth anniversary of the assassination of station director Jean Dominique. The exhibit tells the story of how Radio Haïti-Inter persevered in the face of government repression during dictatorship, military rule, and the democratic era. Under the leadership of Jean Dominique and Miche¿le Montas, Radio Haiti was a voice of social change and democracy, speaking out against oppression and impunity while advocating for human rights and celebrating Haitian culture and heritage. Dominique was assassinated on April 3, 2000 amid a climate of mounting violence against Haiti's free press. Radio Haïti-Inter: Three Decades of Resistance includes photographs and historical objects from the Radio Haiti Collection in the Human Rights Archive of the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library. In a setting evoking a 1980s home in Port-au-Prince, visitors can listen to audio clips of Radio Haiti programming, station jingles, and ambient sounds recorded in Haiti. The original soundboard from the station will be on view along with a microphone and field recorder. Reproductions of photographs, written texts and on-air notes explain the history of Radio Haiti and some of the major events the station covered.

more information »

Radio Haïti-Inter: Three Decades of Resistance Opening Reception

Thursday, February 27, 6:00 PM
Rubenstein Arts Center, Studio 129
Join us in celebrating the opening of Radio Haïti-Inter: Three Decades of Resistance. Curator Laura Wagner will offer brief remarks at 6:30pm, and Leyla McCalla and Kiyoko McCrae will be in attendance (on the first night of their residency leading up to their Duke Performances premiere!). Radio Haïti-Inter: Three Decades of Resistance tells the story of how Radio Haïti-Inter persevered in the face of government repression during dictatorship, military rule, and the democratic era. Under the leadership of Jean Dominique and Michèle Montas, Radio Haiti was a voice of social change and democracy, speaking out against oppression and impunity while advocating for human rights and celebrating Haitian culture and heritage. Dominique was assassinated on April 3, 2000 amid a climate of mounting violence against Haiti's free press. This exhibit and immersive audio experience coincide with the Duke Performances premiere of Breaking the Thermometer to Hide the Fever and the twentieth anniversary of the assassination of station director Jean Dominique.

more information »

Research Data Management 101 for Scientists

Monday, March 2, 1:30 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Scientists work with lots of data both big and small, and in many formats and systems. This workshop will introduce data management practices for scientists to consider and apply throughout the research lifecycle. Good data management practices pertaining to planning, organization, documentation, storage and backup, sharing, citation, and preservation will be presented through a sciences lens using discipline-based, concrete examples. During the workshop, participants will also engage in discussions with their peers on data management concepts as well as learn about one specific tool as a method to assess how tools can enable specific data management practices. The tool explored in this workshop will be GitHub - a robust version control tool.

While good general data management practices are relevant across disciplines, participants working specifically within the sciences are the intended audience for this workshop.

This workshop is eligible for 2 hours of Graduate School RCR Credits.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Research Data Management 101 for Scientists

Monday, March 2, 1:30 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Scientists work with lots of data both big and small, and in many formats and systems. This workshop will introduce data management practices for scientists to consider and apply throughout the research lifecycle. Good data management practices pertaining to planning, organization, documentation, storage and backup, sharing, citation, and preservation will be presented through a sciences lens using discipline-based, concrete examples. During the workshop, participants will also engage in discussions with their peers on data management concepts as well as learn about one specific tool as a method to assess how tools can enable specific data management practices. The tool explored in this workshop will be GitHub - a robust version control tool.

While good general data management practices are relevant across disciplines, participants working specifically within the sciences are the intended audience for this workshop.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

R Open Lab: semi-structured opportunities for learning R

Monday, March 2, 6:00 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Part of the Rfun learning series

Come once or come each week: This six-week, semi-guided hour provides a safe and comfortable environment for learning more about the R programming language, RStudio, and the Tidyverse. The curriculum is based on the Master the Tidyverse workshop. The series goal is to enable researchers and students a low-stress hour to hone your own data savvy skills. Attendees will gain greater familiarity with a tool-suite designed to foster reproducibility and transparency vital for the researcher's workflow.

In the first meeting we will introduce R, RStudio and the Tidyverse as well as outline several self-directed learning resources (below). Follow and join any of the the remining weekly sessions. Each week covers a new topic in the Master the Tidyverse series. Reinforcement is on-your-own through self-directed resources. Assignments are optional. Intermediate and advanced users will, optionally, design your own curriculum and benefit from interacting and supporting a helpful network of campus R users.

Event Dates are all on Mondays: Jan. 13, Feb. 3, Feb. 10, Feb. 17, Feb. 24, March 2.

See our FAQ for more information.

NOTE: Bring your laptop. The Edge Workshop Room does not provide computers.

NOTE 2: If you need help configuring your laptop for this workshop, come to the DVS Walk-In Hours before the workshop: Wednesdays between 1-3pm. (Floor Map for Bostock Library > 1st Floor > Brandaleone Lab for Data and Visualization Services.)

more information »

Digital Brown Bag

Wednesday, March 4, 12:00 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

[specific event information forthcoming]

more information »

Low Maintenance Book Club reads selections from "Broad Band"

Wednesday, March 4, 5:30 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

This spring, the Low Maintenance Book Club will be reading selections from Claire L. Evan's Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet over three meetings. Spanning decades, this book profiles key figures who made advances in programming and technology that led to the online world of today.

Each meeting will feature stand-alone selections from this book, so it is not necessary to attend all meetings to follow along. At this meeting, we'll discuss Chapter 6: "The Longest Cave" (p. 83-94) and Chapter 10: "Hypertext" (p.153-174).

Multiple copies of this book can be found at Duke University Libraries, and Durham County Library.

Spring 2020 meeting schedule:

  • January 22, 5:30pm: Introduction (p. 1-5) and Chapter 2: "Amazing Grace" (p. 27-53)
  • March 4, 5:30pm : Chapter 6: "The Longest Cave" (p. 83-94) and Chapter 10: "Hypertext" (p.153-174).
  • April 7, 5:30pm: Chapter 13: "The Girl Gamers" (p. 222-236) and the Epilogue (p. 237-242). RSVP for this meeting: https://duke.libcal.com/event/6416720 .

more information »

Duke's Unique Teaching Spaces: 3D Printer Lab

Thursday, March 5, 2:00 PM
Technology Engagement Center (TEC)
West Campus

The 3D printer labs on campus allow faculty from a wide range of disciples to teach topics such as design, computer programming, and cultural explorations in the humanities through printing 3D models. Visit one lab during this event to learn about the kinds and locations of printers available on campus, understand the basics of how 3D printers work, hear more about training, and discover other instructors' projects.

Event location: Co-Lab located in the TEC (Technology Engagement Center), TelComm Drive.


In this Spring 2020 event series, Duke’s Unique Teaching Spaces, find out about spaces outside the traditional classroom that you can reserve for class meetings, and which can offer your students opportunities for deep research and engagement. Register for one or more of the upcoming sessions:

Mar 19: The Rubenstein Arts Center

Mar 26: The Game Lab

Apr 2: The Duke Campus Farm

Apr 23: Duke Gardens

more information »

Visualization Friday Forum

Friday, March 6, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend.

more information »

Intro to R: Data Transformations, Data Structures, and the Tidyverse

Tuesday, March 17, 5:45 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Part of the DataFest Workshop Series

An introduction to R and the Tidyverse, using RStudio. This hands-on session introduces data wrangling, visualization, and Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA). We will provide an overview of the Tidyverse -- a consistent set of data science packages -- focusing on dplyr (data wrangling) and ggplot2 (visualizations) packages.

This workshop is part of the Rfun learning series: "R We Having Fun Yet‽" Learn more at https://rfun.library.duke.edu/

NOTE: Bring your laptop. The Edge Workshop Room does not provide computers.

NOTE 2: If you need help configuring your laptop for this workshop, come to the DVS Walk-In Hours before the workshop: Wednesdays between 1-3pm. (Floor Map for Bostock Library > 1st Floor > Brandaleone Lab for Data and Visualization Services.)

NOTE 3: Workshop location is different than the location for laptop configuration help.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Digital Brown Bag

Wednesday, March 18, 12:00 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

[specific event information forthcoming]

more information »

Visualization in R using ggplot2

Wednesday, March 18, 5:45 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Part of the DataFest Workshop Series

NOTE: Bring your laptop. The Edge Workshop Room does not provide computers.

Data science skills are increasingly important for research and industry projects. With complex data science projects, however, come complex needs for understanding and communicating analysis processes and results. Ultimately, an analyst's data science toolbox is incomplete without visualization skills. Incorporating effective visualizations directly into the analysis tool you are using can facilitate quick data exploration, streamline your research process, and improve the reproducibility of your research.

In this workshop we will focus on ggplot2, a library for R that creates clear and well-designed visualizations and that plays well with other tidyverse packages. While prior experience with ggplot2 and with other tidyverse packages is not required, some basic familiarity with R is expected. Please consider attending (or viewing a recording of) our Introduction to R workshop before attending this workshop on ggplot2.

In this workshop, we will use RStudio and RMarkdown files for all exercises. This room does not have computers, so you will need to bring your own laptop. Please make sure you come with RStudio and the tidyverse package installed. You may also want to install the knitr package to be able to compile the entire Rmarkdown file.

Please note: this classroom has a limited number of seats. If you choose to register for the workshop, please make every effort to attend, or if you cannot, please cancel your registration as soon as a conflict comes up. If all spots fill up, we will maintain a waitlist in the event of cancelations. In addition, a previous version of this workshop has been recorded, and the associated files are available on GitHub. If you can't attend but would like to be notified when a recording is available, please contact Angela Zoss.

NOTE: this workshop will run from 6pm to 8pm. The room will be available starting at 5pm, and pizza will be provided starting at 5pm.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Intro to Gephi for Network Visualization

Friday, March 20, 10:00 AM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

Networks (or graphs) are a compelling way of studying relationships between people, places, object, ideas, etc. Generating network data and visualizations, however, can be an involved and unintuitive process requiring specialized tools. This workshop will explore some of the easier ways to produce, load, and visualize network data using Gephi, an open source, multi-platform network analysis and visualization application.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Dashboards, slides, and R Markdown

Tuesday, March 24, 1:30 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Part of the Rfun learning series

Explore the variety of reports that can be generated with R. Learn to compose dashboards while easily implementing the inherent interactivity of HTMLWidgets orchestrated through R and RStudio.

Flexible and reproducible reports are easily produced using literate programming techniques. The R/RStudio/Tidyverse suite enables you to render your analysis into a wide variety of elegant reports. Simplicity is a key factor. An R notebook can be repurposed to produce interactive dashboards, slides, e-books, journal articles, PDF documents, MS Word, MS Power Point, Excel, Web Pages, Web Sites, and more. R Markdown is the key to structuring your final report document. Code chunks containing R code, within literate programming scripts, enable any R author to reproducibly render multiple report outputs. These techniques enable you to reach your target audience.

Come learn how to produce dashboards and slides. Add interactivity with an artful selection of easily leveraged HTML Widgets. Along the way you'll learn how you can render your analysis script into an array of different report outputs, pursuant to your audience needs.

Prerequisites:

NOTE: Bring your laptop.

  1. Use a cloud version of R, or install R & RStudio in advance (instructions)
  2. Install the tidyverse, flexdashboard, crostalk, leaflet, DT, plotly, and dygraphs packages in advance (instructions)

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Open Studio (ScholarWorks)

Tuesday, March 24, 1:30 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Make an appointment or just drop-in during Open Studio hours, to consult with staff of ScholarWorks, A Center for Scholarly Publishing at Duke University Libraries. We can help you to

  • plan and create a digital publication
  • build adience engagement and impact
  • improve discovery and use
  • sustain a digital publication
  • integrate data publishing
  • and other aspects of expanding the potential for your scholarly work

Visit ScholarWorks.duke.edu for more examples of the kinds of questions we can answer as well as for resources you can use now. You can also contact scholarworks@duke.edu with your questions or ideas and we'll put you in contact with the appropriate person to help.

event image

more information »

Presenting Data Science Results to Stakeholders

Tuesday, March 24, 5:45 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Part of the DataFest Workshop Series

Communicating with stakeholders is a core process in any data science project. For most projects, stakeholder communication happens regularly to ensure that the analysis and outputs are structured to meet stakeholder needs. For some groups of stakeholders, however, the only ability to interact will be in a final presentation. This presentation will focus on strategies for developing a short presentation that summarizes a data science project, including: identifying a compelling story in the analysis; leading with the key takeaways; and presenting results simply, effectively, and visually.

NOTE: This is not a hands-on workshop. No computers are required.

ALSO NOTE: this workshop will run from 6pm to 7pm. The room will be available starting at 5pm, and pizza will be provided starting at 5pm.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Tackling Data Competition Challenges: Strategies for Success

Wednesday, March 25, 5:45 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Part of the DataFest Workshop Series

Getting a new big dataset with a short deadline for data exploration, analysis, and communication of results is a common challenge; doing so with a new team for a DataFest, Datathon, or other competition adds extra complexity.

You'll be assigned a team at the start (or may bring your own). We will provide the large public dataset and challenge; you will get hands-on practice at deciding where to begin, how to break up tasks across a team, and how to manage your workflow to produce the deliverables. The assigned task will be modest; our goal is to improve your metacognitive strategies for successfully managing a data challenge.

The workshop facilitators are from the Department of Statistical Science. Choose your own software tools. Bring your own laptop.

more information »

Research Reproducibility: Tips and Tools

Tuesday, March 31, 1:30 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

In response to a growing focus on the importance of reproducibility, replication, and transparency in the research endeavor, scholars are adapting their practices and learning new skills and tools. This workshop will introduce some foundational strategies that can increase the reproducibility of your work. You will also learn about specific tools and protocols that you might use within your research workflows including the TIER protocol, git and GitHub, and online containerization tools such as Binder and Code Ocean.

This workshop is eligible for 2 hours of Graduate School RCR Credits.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Research Reproducibility: Tips and Tools

Tuesday, March 31, 1:30 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

In response to a growing focus on the importance of reproducibility, replication, and transparency in the research endeavor, scholars are adapting their practices and learning new skills and tools. This workshop will introduce some foundational strategies that can increase the reproducibility of your work. You will also learn about specific tools and protocols that you might use within your research workflows including the TIER protocol, git and GitHub, and online containerization tools such as Binder and Code Ocean.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Open Studio (ScholarWorks)

Tuesday, March 31, 1:30 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Make an appointment or just drop-in during Open Studio hours, to consult with staff of ScholarWorks, A Center for Scholarly Publishing at Duke University Libraries. We can help you to

  • plan and create a digital publication
  • build adience engagement and impact
  • improve discovery and use
  • sustain a digital publication
  • integrate data publishing
  • and other aspects of expanding the potential for your scholarly work

Visit ScholarWorks.duke.edu for more examples of the kinds of questions we can answer as well as for resources you can use now. You can also contact scholarworks@duke.edu with your questions or ideas and we'll put you in contact with the appropriate person to help.

event image

more information »

Intro to Tableau: Easy Charts and Maps

Tuesday, March 31, 5:45 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Part of the DataFest Workshop Series

Tableau Public (available for both Windows and Mac) is free software that allows individuals to quickly and easily explore their data with a wide variety of visual representations, as well as create interactive web-based visualization dashboards. This workshop will focus on using Tableau Public to create data visualizations, starting with an overview of how the program thinks about data, common data manipulation and loading, and the terminology used. Activities will include a sample data visualization and mapping project, which will give people hands-on experience using Tableau’s basic chart types and dashboard creation tools. We will also discuss publishing to the Tableau Public web server and related services and tools, like the full Tableau Desktop application (free for full-time students).

NOTE: Bring your laptop. The Edge Workshop Room does not provide computers.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Digital Brown Bag

Wednesday, April 1, 12:00 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

[specific event information forthcoming]

more information »

Visualization Friday Forum

Friday, April 3, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend.

more information »

Research Data Management 201: How and where to publish your data

Tuesday, April 7, 1:00 PM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

Data management practices help researchers take care of their data throughout the entire research process from the planning phase to the end of a project when data might be shared or “published” within a repository. Building upon the foundational concepts covered in the Data Management 101 courses offered this year, this workshop will provide hands-on experience where participants will learn strategies for how to prepare data for publishing by “curating” an example dataset and identifying common data issues. Participants will also learn about the overall role of repositories within the data sharing landscape and learn strategies for locating and assessing repositories.

Participants are not required to have taken a Data Management 101 course (although it is recommended). This workshop is also a reconceptualization of the previously offered “RDM 201: Preparing Your Data for Publishing” and “Finding a Home for Your Data: An Introduction to Archives and Repositories” workshops offered in previous semesters - participants who have attended these previous workshops should not attend.

This workshop is eligible for 2 hours of Graduate School RCR Credits.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Open Studio (ScholarWorks)

Tuesday, April 7, 1:30 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Make an appointment or just drop-in during Open Studio hours, to consult with staff of ScholarWorks, A Center for Scholarly Publishing at Duke University Libraries. We can help you to

  • plan and create a digital publication
  • build adience engagement and impact
  • improve discovery and use
  • sustain a digital publication
  • integrate data publishing
  • and other aspects of expanding the potential for your scholarly work

Visit ScholarWorks.duke.edu for more examples of the kinds of questions we can answer as well as for resources you can use now. You can also contact scholarworks@duke.edu with your questions or ideas and we'll put you in contact with the appropriate person to help.

event image

more information »

Low Maintenance Book Club reads selections from "Broad Band"

Tuesday, April 7, 5:30 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

This spring, the Low Maintenance Book Club will be reading selections from Claire L. Evan's Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet over three meetings. Spanning decades, this book profiles key figures who made advances in programming and technology that led to the online world of today.

Each meeting will feature stand-alone selections from this book, so it is not necessary to attend all meetings to follow along. At this meeting, we'll discuss Chapter 13: "The Girl Gamers" (p. 222-236) and the Epilogue (p. 237-242).

Multiple copies of this book can be found at Duke University Libraries, and Durham County Library.

Spring 2020 meeting schedule:

  • January 22, 5:30pm: Introduction (p. 1-5) and Chapter 2: "Amazing Grace" (p. 27-53)
  • March 4, 5:30pm : Chapter 6: "The Longest Cave" (p. 83-94) and Chapter 10: "Hypertext" (p.153-174).
  • April 7, 5:30pm: Chapter 13: "The Girl Gamers" (p. 222-236) and the Epilogue (p. 237-242).

more information »

Digital Brown Bag

Wednesday, April 15, 12:00 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

[specific event information forthcoming]

more information »

Ciompi Quartet Lunchtime Classics

Thursday, April 23, 12:00 PM
Rubenstein Library Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room 153
The Ciompi Quartet and students in the Duke Chamber Music Program present a free, noontime concert of chamber works with discussion and commentary. The Ciompi Quartet was founded at Duke University in 1965 by the renowned Italian violinist Giorgio Ciompi. All its members are professors at Duke and play a leading role in its cultural life, in addition to traveling widely throughout the year for performances. In a career that includes many hundreds of concerts and spans five continents, the Ciompi Quartet has developed a reputation for performances of real intelligence and musical sophistication, and for a warm, unified sound that is enhanced by each player's strong individual voice. This concert is presented in association with Duke University Libraries.

more information »

Duke's Unique Teaching Spaces: Duke Gardens

Thursday, April 23, 2:00 PM
West Campus

Interested in getting your students outside of the traditional classroom and using Duke's unique resources in your teaching? In this series, find out about spaces at Duke that can offer your students opportunities for deep research and engagement and how faculty integrate those experiences in their courses.

Duke Gardens is a 55-acre botanic garden, complete with Wi-Fi and outlets, right in the middle of campus. Faculty from all across Duke (engineering, school of the environment, dance, religious studies, computer science, psychology & neuroscience, romance studies, and writing, just to name a few) have developed assignments making use of the Gardens, held class outdoors, created undergraduate-level field trips that complement their curriculum, and conducted academic research in the Gardens.

In this session, hear about past & ongoing collaborations and discuss how you can make Duke Gardens a part of your class as you enjoy a spring tour of our space with Kati Henderson, coordinator of academic programs at Duke Gardens.

Event location is Doris Duke Center, Duke Gardens, 420 Anderson Street.

more information »

News, Events, and Exhibits from Duke University Libraries