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All Library Events

Working with Sources 

Monday, November 18, 1:30 PM
Other (see event description)
West Campus

Working with texts is a key element of nearly all scholarly writing, but especially so in the humanities and interpretive social sciences. Students’ knowledge of practices such as source selection; employing summary, paraphrase, and quotation; and citation is often rudimentary and their attempts often lack rhetorical purpose. This session gives an overview of common challenges students face in working with sources and explores strategies for helping students approach sources effectively as writers.

LSRC B102, West Campus. Please register here.

From the Thompson Writing Program’s Writing in the Disciplines program. For more information about this event, contact Cary Moskovitz.

more information »

Faculty Bookwatch | The Fixer: Visa Lottery Chronicles by Charles Piot

Tuesday, November 19, 10:00 AM
Smith Warehouse, Ahmadieh Family Lecture Hall, Bay 4, C105
Please RSVP for event & lunch at https://fixer.eventbrite.com/ Please join the Franklin Humanities Institute and Duke University Libraries for a Faculty Bookwatch panel on The Fixer: Visa Lottery Chronicles (Duke University Press, 2019). In this book, Duke anthropologist Charles Piot follows Kodjo Nicolas Batema, a visa broker-known as a "fixer"-in the West African nation of Togo as he helps his clients apply for the US Diversity Visa Lottery program. Through detailed and compelling stories, The Fixer illustrates the desire and savviness of migrants as they work to find what they hope will be a better life. Charles Piot is Professor of Cultural Anthropology and African & African American Studies at Duke. Panel: Moderator: Ranjana Khanna, Duke University Ian Baucom, University of Virginia Tsitsi Jaji, Duke University Hans Lucht, Danish Institute for International Studies Achille Mbembe, Wits Institute for Social & Economic Research Aïssatou Mbodj, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Institut des mondes africains Henrik Vigh, University of Copenhagen Lunch & book sale to follow. Faculty Bookwatch celebrates and promotes interdisciplinary conversations on major recent books by Duke humanities or interpretative social sciences faculty. Each Bookwatch program brings together a panel of distinguished colleagues giving brief comments on the significance and impact of the featured book.

more information »

Teaching & Learning in the Diverse Classroom: MOOC Discussion

Tuesday, November 19, 12:00 PM
Bostock 039
West Campus

This informal brown-bag discussion will center on the learning experience in the free open online course "Teaching & Learning in the Diverse Classroom," created by Cornell University Center for Teaching Innovation, and hosted on the edX platform from November 4 - December 9, 2019. This online course for higher education instructors focuses on how to create and sustain inclusive, student-centered learning environments.

Read more about the online course here, and register for the edX MOOC (for free) here.

Those who are taking the online course are welcome to gather Tuesdays 12-1 PM, to discuss the content and activities from the prior week of the course. Attending these discussions is optional, of course - you are free to participate in the MOOC without joining these in-person discussions.

  • Tuesday 11/12 - discuss the November 4-11 course activities and readings.
  • Tuesday 11/19 - discuss the November 11-18 course activities and readings.
  • Tuesday 11/26 - discuss the November 18-25 course activities and readings.
  • Tuesday 12/3 - discuss the November 25-December 2 course activities and readings.
  • Tuesday 12/10 - discuss the December 3-9 course activities and readings.

You're welcome to bring your own lunch and drink; we'll provide dessert.

more information »

Creating a Profession: The Education of American Surgeons, 1900-1960

Tuesday, November 19, 12:00 PM
Rubenstein Library 153 (Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room)
West Campus

Join us for our next Trent History of Medicine Lecture Series.

Justin Barr, M.D., Ph.D, will present "Creating a Profession: The Education of American Surgeons, 1900-1960."

Dr. Barr will discuss how the influence of war, the support of the federal government, and the drive of professional organizations led to the transformation of surgical education and residencies to help create a unified profession that continues to influence health care in this country.

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more information »

Creating a Profession: The Education of American Surgeons, 1900-1960

Tuesday, November 19, 12:00 PM
Rubenstein Library Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room 153
Dr. Barr will discuss how the influence of war, the support of the federal government, and the drive of professional organizations led to the transformation of surgical education and residencies to help create a unified profession that continues to influence health care in this country.

more information »

Open Studio (ScholarWorks)

Tuesday, November 19, 1:30 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Make an appointment or just drop-in during Open Studio hours, to consult with staff of ScholarWorks, A Center for Scholarly Publishing at Duke University Libraries. We can help you to

  • plan and create a digital publication
  • build adience engagement and impact
  • improve discovery and use
  • sustain a digital publication
  • integrate data publishing
  • and other aspects of expanding the potential for your scholarly work

Visit ScholarWorks.duke.edu for more examples of the kinds of questions we can answer as well as for resources you can use now. You can also contact scholarworks@duke.edu with your questions or ideas and we'll put you in contact with the appropriate person to help.

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more information »

Create Augmented Reality Media with ThingLink

Tuesday, November 19, 2:00 PM
Bostock 039
West Campus

Duke faculty, students, and staff are invited to learn about the educational application ThingLink, a tool for creating augmented images and videos. ThingLink allows users to tag (standard or 360º) photos and videos with embedded text, videos, images, audio, plus links to more information. The product is a media-rich item that can be shared by URL, inserted into a website, or shared privately. Attend this session to learn how to use ThingLink and get set up with your free account. You are also welcome to attend virtually, simply indicate that preference in your RSVP.

Read more about the pilot.

more information »

Assessment and Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

Wednesday, November 20, 12:00 PM
Rubenstein Library 349 (Breedlove Conference Room)
West Campus

Hosted by Trinity College Office of Assessment

Assessment can and should contribute to the scholarship of teaching and learning! Join us for a lunchtime panel session on translating assessment into published scholarship. Topics will include preparing for informed consent and institutional review, accessing and using Trinity College data, and aligning your research methodologies with the assessment priorities of the program.

Panelists:

  • Bridgette Hard, Associate Professor of the Practice, Psychology and Neuroscience,
  • Marcia Rego, Associate Professor of the Practice, Thompson Writing Program, and
  • Julie Reynolds, Associate Professor of the Practice, Biology.

Alex Martinez, Associate Director of the Campus IRB, and Kim Manturuk, Associate Director of Research, Evaluation and Development in Duke Learning Innovation will be present to answer questions.

Lunch will be provided.

more information »

A Professor's Experience with Peer Evaluation

Thursday, November 21, 12:00 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Professor Robert Duvall (Computer Science) will speak about his experiences organize peer evaluation of group work. As a part of their grades when working in teams, students are expected to rate their own participation in the group, as well as to provide feedback about how their colleagues contributed (or not) to the team. He will share the types of questions he asks students in order to extract meaningful feedback to be used as a basis for improving student team work, and about his attempts to bring some formality to peer grading through online programs and grading guidelines.

Lunch will be provided.

more information »

Table Top Role Playing Game Narrative Design

Thursday, November 21, 4:00 PM
Other (see event description)
West Campus

This workshop will be in Link Classroom 6, Perkins Library. Participants are encouraged to stay after the workshop for open lab time.


Are you an avid RPG player? Would you like to build compelling story arcs for games like Dungeons and Dragons and Pathfinder? Join like-mind participants and work with an experienced Dungeon Master to get started.

This workshop is part of a series leading into the Global Game Jam (Jan. 31st-Feb.02, 2020, https://globalgamejam.org/2020/jam-sites/duke-university) The GGJ is the world's largest game jam where participants design, iterate, and share games in a whirlwind 48 hours. Registration opens in November so make sure you sign up for the Games and Culture email list for updates by emailing gamesandculture@duke.edu!

Co-sponsored by the Duke Game Lab, the Games and Culture Lab, and Learning Innovation. Please contact Katya Gorecki (kg134@duke.edu) with any questions about the workshop series or the GGJ.

more information »

Research Reproducibility: Education and Practice

Friday, November 22, 12:00 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

“Reproducibility is important not because it ensures that the results are correct, but rather because it ensures transparency and gives us confidence in understanding exactly what was done.” - Roger Peng (2014), Johns Hopkins University, Professor of Biostatistics. (1)

Enabling reproducible research - as in the ability to reproduce reported results through the re-analysis of the original data and code - is incredibly important but also not a simple thing to accomplish. When more than 70% of researchers have tried and failed to reproduce another scientist’s experiments (and more than half fail to reproduce their own) (2), it is important to teach both new and experienced researchers how to engage in data management practices and use new tools and methods that make their research methods transparent, and results reproducible. The Center for Data and Visualization Sciences has invited a panel of four scholars to discuss how to engage in reproducible research practices, make use of tools to aid in the process, and help educate the next generation of scholars.

Panelists include:

  1. Steven Grambow, Ph.D, Assistant Professor of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics
  2. Angela Zoss, Ph.D, Assessment and Data Visualization Analyst, Duke University Libraries
  3. Robert Schick, Ph.D., Research Scientist, Marine Science and Conservation, Nicholas School for the Environment
  4. Maria Tackett, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of the Practice of Statistical Science

Lunch will be provided

  1. https://simplystatistics.org/2014/06/06/the-real-reason-reproducible-research-is-important/
  2. https://www.nature.com/news/1-500-scientists-lift-the-lid-on-reproducibility-1.19970

more information »

Spaces of Translation

Friday, November 22, 2:00 PM
Smith Warehouse - Bay 10, 2nd Floor
Arpeggio is an annual graduate-student organized interdisciplinary conference of AAHVS department. This year, with the overarching theme of "Spaces of Translation," Arpeggio invites scholars and students to explore the relationship between the original and reinterpreted, the authors and translators, and the artists and art historians from diverse regions such as China, France, Mexico, and the United States. Three speakers - Amara Solari (Penn State University Professor, Pre-Columbian and Colonial Latin American Art), Kristel Smentek (MIT Professor, Eighteenth-century European art and Asian-European Cultural Interaction), Dario Robleto (Contemporary artist based in Houston, TX interested in the intersection between art and science) - will give valuable talks and a panel discussion will follow. Arpeggio will take place at 2:00pm on Friday, November 22 in the Collision Space, Smith Warehouse, Bay 10, A266. The event begins at 2:00pm with Dr. Amara Solari's presentation of her paper "The Translatable Sacristy: Maya Blue and the Reception of Triune Theology in 16th C. Yucatan," followed at 2:55pm with Dr. Kristel Smentek's presentation of her paper "China in the Studio in 18th C. France," and concludes at 4:05pm with Dario Robleto's presentation of his paper "Small Crafts on Sisyphean Seas." A panel discussion will start at 5:00pm with a reception to immediately follow. Arpeggio is free and open to the public.

more information »

Teaching & Learning in the Diverse Classroom: MOOC Discussion

Tuesday, November 26, 12:00 PM
Bostock 039
West Campus

This informal brown-bag discussion will center on the learning experience in the free open online course "Teaching & Learning in the Diverse Classroom," created by Cornell University Center for Teaching Innovation, and hosted on the edX platform from November 4 - December 9, 2019. This online course for higher education instructors focuses on how to create and sustain inclusive, student-centered learning environments.

Read more about the online course here, and register for the edX MOOC (for free) here.

Those who are taking the online course are welcome to gather Tuesdays 12-1 PM, to discuss the content and activities from the prior week of the course. Attending these discussions is optional, of course - you are free to participate in the MOOC without joining these in-person discussions.

  • Tuesday 11/12 - discuss the November 4-11 course activities and readings.
  • Tuesday 11/19 - discuss the November 11-18 course activities and readings.
  • Tuesday 11/26 - discuss the November 18-25 course activities and readings.
  • Tuesday 12/3 - discuss the November 25-December 2 course activities and readings.
  • Tuesday 12/10 - discuss the December 3-9 course activities and readings.

You're welcome to bring your own lunch and drink; we'll provide dessert.

more information »

Open Studio (ScholarWorks)

Tuesday, November 26, 1:30 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Make an appointment or just drop-in during Open Studio hours, to consult with staff of ScholarWorks, A Center for Scholarly Publishing at Duke University Libraries. We can help you to

  • plan and create a digital publication
  • build adience engagement and impact
  • improve discovery and use
  • sustain a digital publication
  • integrate data publishing
  • and other aspects of expanding the potential for your scholarly work

Visit ScholarWorks.duke.edu for more examples of the kinds of questions we can answer as well as for resources you can use now. You can also contact scholarworks@duke.edu with your questions or ideas and we'll put you in contact with the appropriate person to help.

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more information »

Teaching & Learning in the Diverse Classroom: MOOC Discussion

Tuesday, December 3, 12:00 PM
Bostock 039
West Campus

This informal brown-bag discussion will center on the learning experience in the free open online course "Teaching & Learning in the Diverse Classroom," created by Cornell University Center for Teaching Innovation, and hosted on the edX platform from November 4 - December 9, 2019. This online course for higher education instructors focuses on how to create and sustain inclusive, student-centered learning environments.

Read more about the online course here, and register for the edX MOOC (for free) here.

Those who are taking the online course are welcome to gather Tuesdays 12-1 PM, to discuss the content and activities from the prior week of the course. Attending these discussions is optional, of course - you are free to participate in the MOOC without joining these in-person discussions.

  • Tuesday 11/12 - discuss the November 4-11 course activities and readings.
  • Tuesday 11/19 - discuss the November 11-18 course activities and readings.
  • Tuesday 11/26 - discuss the November 18-25 course activities and readings.
  • Tuesday 12/3 - discuss the November 25-December 2 course activities and readings.
  • Tuesday 12/10 - discuss the December 3-9 course activities and readings.

You're welcome to bring your own lunch and drink; we'll provide dessert.

more information »

Open Studio (ScholarWorks)

Tuesday, December 3, 1:30 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Make an appointment or just drop-in during Open Studio hours, to consult with staff of ScholarWorks, A Center for Scholarly Publishing at Duke University Libraries. We can help you to

  • plan and create a digital publication
  • build adience engagement and impact
  • improve discovery and use
  • sustain a digital publication
  • integrate data publishing
  • and other aspects of expanding the potential for your scholarly work

Visit ScholarWorks.duke.edu for more examples of the kinds of questions we can answer as well as for resources you can use now. You can also contact scholarworks@duke.edu with your questions or ideas and we'll put you in contact with the appropriate person to help.

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more information »

BRITE Ideas Teaching and Research Series

Wednesday, December 4, 12:00 PM
Rubenstein Library 249 (Carpenter Conference Room)
West Campus

Learning Innovation and BRITE Lab invite you to join us for BRITE Ideas, a monthly discussion group to share and develop research on teaching and learning. Invited guest speakers include those who have either completed or are currently engaged in research projects about teaching and learning. Please join Christina Bejjani and Brenda Yang as they share research on "Insights across disciplines: What do Duke Students Believe About Intelligence?

All meetings are located in the Rubenstein Library, Room 249, from 12:00 – 1:00pm. Light refreshments will be provided – you are welcome to bring your lunch.

About BRITE Lab

The BRITE Lab at Duke University aims to improve higher education by applying the theories and methods of psychology: the scientific study of the mind and behavior. Our research draws insights from the study of human cognition, emotion, social interaction, and culture to understand college students’ experiences and develop better educational practices. We use the tools of science to find out whether and why different educational methods work.

more information »

VFF: Sifting Data

Friday, December 6, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
This summer, independent artist Heather Gordon completed a residency at the Rubenstein Center for the Arts with a project titled "Forest for the Trees". Please join us for Heather's discussion of how orphaned data from Duke Forest archives expanded her artistic practice and informs her creative output with a more outward looking stance. Over her career, Heather has used both personal and public data to construct origami folding patterns to show the shape of a specific narrative. Her presentation will trace the origins of her ideas about the ambiguities of number, the acquisition of meaning, and the fear of unperceived existence. Specifically, she will speak to how and why she creates geometric folding patterns using rule-based methods and a variety of data such as binary conversions, date and time intervals, and geographic locations to create visual information structures.

more information »

Managing Your Course with Kits

Monday, December 9, 1:00 PM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

Are you using two or more learning apps to teach your course? Maybe even three apps or more such as WordPress, Box, and Warpwire? Kits is a new learning platform at Duke that that makes finding and sharing learning apps with your students easy. Attend this workshop to learn the basics of Kits such as adding apps, managing participants, and sending notifications.

Learn more about Kits in Learning Innovation’s recent blog post.

more information »

Teaching & Learning in the Diverse Classroom: MOOC Discussion

Tuesday, December 10, 12:00 PM
Bostock 039
West Campus

This informal brown-bag discussion will center on the learning experience in the free open online course "Teaching & Learning in the Diverse Classroom," created by Cornell University Center for Teaching Innovation, and hosted on the edX platform from November 4 - December 9, 2019. This online course for higher education instructors focuses on how to create and sustain inclusive, student-centered learning environments.

Read more about the online course here, and register for the edX MOOC (for free) here.

Those who are taking the online course are welcome to gather Tuesdays 12-1 PM, to discuss the content and activities from the prior week of the course. Attending these discussions is optional, of course - you are free to participate in the MOOC without joining these in-person discussions.

  • Tuesday 11/12 - discuss the November 4-11 course activities and readings.
  • Tuesday 11/19 - discuss the November 11-18 course activities and readings.
  • Tuesday 11/26 - discuss the November 18-25 course activities and readings.
  • Tuesday 12/3 - discuss the November 25-December 2 course activities and readings.
  • Tuesday 12/10 - discuss the December 3-9 course activities and readings.

You're welcome to bring your own lunch and drink; we'll provide dessert.

more information »

Open Studio (ScholarWorks)

Tuesday, December 10, 1:30 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Make an appointment or just drop-in during Open Studio hours, to consult with staff of ScholarWorks, A Center for Scholarly Publishing at Duke University Libraries. We can help you to

  • plan and create a digital publication
  • build adience engagement and impact
  • improve discovery and use
  • sustain a digital publication
  • integrate data publishing
  • and other aspects of expanding the potential for your scholarly work

Visit ScholarWorks.duke.edu for more examples of the kinds of questions we can answer as well as for resources you can use now. You can also contact scholarworks@duke.edu with your questions or ideas and we'll put you in contact with the appropriate person to help.

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more information »

Copyright and Fair Use in Research & Publishing

Friday, January 10, 12:00 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Copyright issues have become more important, and more contentious, than ever before. This workshop will examine some of the basic principles of copyright law and discuss how they apply to research and publishing. We will also consider the issue of intellectual property ownership for scholars and how that ownership can best be managed to serve the interests of the scholar and of the academic community in general.

Lunch will not be provided as part of this workshop, but feel free to bring your own.

*Although anyone may register, this event will be most useful to students in engineering and the natural sciences.

Arnetta Girardeau is the Copyright and Information Policy Consultant at Duke University Libraries. She is the libraries’ first point of contact for copyright and related law questions and consultations and conducts outreach and education on copyright and connected issues. She is a Duke alum (MA, Cultural Anthropology), and is also a graduate of Florida State (MSLIS), UNC School of Law (JD), and Harvard (AB, History).

Hosted by Duke University Libraries in collaboration with Pratt Graduate Communications and Intercultural Programs.

more information »

Open Studio (ScholarWorks)

Tuesday, January 14, 1:30 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Make an appointment or just drop-in during Open Studio hours, to consult with staff of ScholarWorks, A Center for Scholarly Publishing at Duke University Libraries. We can help you to

  • plan and create a digital publication
  • build adience engagement and impact
  • improve discovery and use
  • sustain a digital publication
  • integrate data publishing
  • and other aspects of expanding the potential for your scholarly work

Visit ScholarWorks.duke.edu for more examples of the kinds of questions we can answer as well as for resources you can use now. You can also contact scholarworks@duke.edu with your questions or ideas and we'll put you in contact with the appropriate person to help.

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more information »

Getting it Write: Overcoming Writing Procrastination

Friday, January 24, 12:00 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Most people procrastinate when it comes to writing at least some times--but why? This workshop will explore the personal and academic cultural reasons why graduate students procrastinate. Then, we will explore research-based motivation and goal-setting methods to overcome writing procrastination.

Lunch will not be provided as part of this workshop, but feel free to bring your own.

*Although anyone may register, this event will be most useful to students in engineering and the natural sciences.

Michelle M. Campbell is a Communications Consultant for Graduate Communications and Intercultural Programs in the Pratt School of Engineering at Duke University. She teaches writing classes, facilitates workshops, and works one-on-one with engineering graduate students in the Pratt Graduate Communications Center. Dr. Campbell earned her Ph.D. from Purdue University, where she taught oral and written communications for graduate students and served as the Graduate Writing Workshop Coordinator for the Purdue Writing Lab.

Hosted by Duke University Libraries in collaboration with Pratt Graduate Communications and Intercultural Programs.

more information »

Open Studio (ScholarWorks)

Tuesday, January 28, 1:30 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Make an appointment or just drop-in during Open Studio hours, to consult with staff of ScholarWorks, A Center for Scholarly Publishing at Duke University Libraries. We can help you to

  • plan and create a digital publication
  • build adience engagement and impact
  • improve discovery and use
  • sustain a digital publication
  • integrate data publishing
  • and other aspects of expanding the potential for your scholarly work

Visit ScholarWorks.duke.edu for more examples of the kinds of questions we can answer as well as for resources you can use now. You can also contact scholarworks@duke.edu with your questions or ideas and we'll put you in contact with the appropriate person to help.

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more information »

Surviving and Responding to Peer-Review Feedback

Friday, February 21, 12:00 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Submitting your manuscript to a journal is not the end of the process, and rejections and mandatory revisions are par for the course. This workshop will help attendees navigate the peer-review process as an author. We will learn about the peer-review process, cover what to do with initial peer-review feedback, and learn best practices for responding to peer-review feedback when submitting subsequent drafts of a manuscript.

Lunch will not be provided as part of this workshop, but feel free to bring your own.

*Although anyone may register, this event will be most useful to students in engineering and the natural sciences.

Michelle M. Campbell is a Communications Consultant for Graduate Communications and Intercultural Programs in the Pratt School of Engineering at Duke University. She teaches writing classes, facilitates workshops, and works one-on-one with engineering graduate students in the Pratt Graduate Communications Center. Dr. Campbell earned her Ph.D. from Purdue University, where she taught oral and written communications for graduate students and served as the Graduate Writing Workshop Coordinator for the Purdue Writing Lab

Hosted by Duke University Libraries in collaboration with Pratt Graduate Communications and Intercultural Programs.

more information »

Open Studio (ScholarWorks)

Tuesday, February 25, 1:30 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Make an appointment or just drop-in during Open Studio hours, to consult with staff of ScholarWorks, A Center for Scholarly Publishing at Duke University Libraries. We can help you to

  • plan and create a digital publication
  • build adience engagement and impact
  • improve discovery and use
  • sustain a digital publication
  • integrate data publishing
  • and other aspects of expanding the potential for your scholarly work

Visit ScholarWorks.duke.edu for more examples of the kinds of questions we can answer as well as for resources you can use now. You can also contact scholarworks@duke.edu with your questions or ideas and we'll put you in contact with the appropriate person to help.

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more information »

DataFest Workshop Series: Intro to R: Data Transformations, Data Structures, and the Tidyverse

Tuesday, March 17, 5:00 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

An introduction to R and the Tidyverse, using RStudio. This hands-on session introduces data wrangling, visualization, and Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA). We will provide an overview of the Tidyverse -- a consistent set of data science packages -- focusing on dplyr (data wrangling) and ggplot2 (visualizations) packages.

This workshop is part of the Rfun learning series: "R We Having Fun Yet‽" Learn more at https://rfun.library.duke.edu/

NOTE: Bring your laptop. The Edge Workshop Room does not provide computers.

NOTE 2: If you need help configuring your laptop for this workshop, come to the DVS Walk-In Hours before the workshop: Wednesdays between 1-3pm. (Floor Map for Bostock Library > 1st Floor > Brandaleone Lab for Data and Visualization Services.)

NOTE 3: Workshop location is different than the location for laptop configuration help.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

DataFest Workshop Series - Visualization in R using ggplot2

Wednesday, March 18, 5:00 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

NOTE: Bring your laptop. The Edge Workshop Room does not provide computers.

Data science skills are increasingly important for research and industry projects. With complex data science projects, however, come complex needs for understanding and communicating analysis processes and results. Ultimately, an analyst's data science toolbox is incomplete without visualization skills. Incorporating effective visualizations directly into the analysis tool you are using can facilitate quick data exploration, streamline your research process, and improve the reproducibility of your research.

In this workshop we will focus on ggplot2, a library for R that creates clear and well-designed visualizations and that plays well with other tidyverse packages. While prior experience with ggplot2 and with other tidyverse packages is not required, some basic familiarity with R is expected. Please consider attending (or viewing a recording of) our Introduction to R workshop before attending this workshop on ggplot2.

In this workshop, we will use RStudio and RMarkdown files for all exercises. This room does not have computers, so you will need to bring your own laptop. Please make sure you come with RStudio and the tidyverse package installed. You may also want to install the knitr package to be able to compile the entire Rmarkdown file. Workshop materials are available if you would like to review them in advance.

Please note: this classroom has a limited number of seats. If you choose to register for the workshop, please make every effort to attend, or if you cannot, please cancel your registration as soon as a conflict comes up. If all spots fill up, we will maintain a waitlist in the event of cancelations. In addition, a previous version of this workshop has been recorded, and the associated files are available on GitHub. If you can't attend but would like to be notified when a recording is available, please contact Angela Zoss.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Retractions in Science and Social Science Literature

Friday, March 20, 12:00 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

This workshop will discuss the burgeoning phenomena of retractions in the scientific and social scientific literature. No one plans to have an article retracted, so we will cover what to do to avoid or address a retraction or expression of concern and what the existing editorial literature can offer if you do find yourself dealing with a retraction as an author or one of a group of authors.

Lunch will not be provided as part of this workshop, but feel free to bring your own.

*Although anyone may register, this event will be most useful to students in the social sciences, engineering and the natural sciences.

Ciara Healy is the librarian for Psychology, Neuroscience, Mathematics and Physics at Duke University. She/They teach library instruction courses, covering all aspects of information organization and access. She supports citation software for the university libraries, and offers workshops to small groups. She is available for research consultations, and general support for research across the sciences and social sciences.

Hosted by Duke University Libraries in collaboration with Pratt Graduate Communications and Intercultural Programs.

more information »

DataFest Workshop Series - Presenting Data Science Results to Stakeholders

Tuesday, March 24, 5:00 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Communicating with stakeholders is a core process in any data science project. For most projects, stakeholder communication happens regularly to ensure that the analysis and outputs are structured to meet stakeholder needs. For some groups of stakeholders, however, the only ability to interact will be in a final presentation. This presentation will focus on strategies for developing a short presentation that summarizes a data science project, including: identifying a compelling story in the analysis; leading with the key takeaways; and presenting results simply, effectively, and visually.

NOTE: This is not a hands-on workshop. No computers are required.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

DataFest Workshop Series: Tackling Data Competition Challenges: Strategies for Success

Wednesday, March 25, 5:00 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus
Getting a new big dataset with a short deadline for data exploration, analysis, and communication of results is a common challenge; doing so with a new team for a DataFest, Datathon, or other competition adds extra complexity.
This interactive workshop is a practice mini-competition. You'll be assigned a team at the start (or may bring your own). We will provide the large public dataset and challenge; you will get hands-on practice at deciding where to begin, how to break up tasks across a team, and how to manage your workflow to produce the deliverables. The assigned task will be modest; our goal is to improve your metacognitive strategies for successfully managing a data challenge.
The workshop facilitators are from the Department of Statistical Science. Choose your own software tools. Bring your own laptop.

more information »

DataFest Workshop Series: Intro to Tableau – Easy Charts and Maps

Tuesday, March 31, 5:00 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

NOTE: Bring your laptop. The Edge Workshop Room does not provide computers.

Tableau Public (available for both Windows and Mac) is free software that allows individuals to quickly and easily explore their data with a wide variety of visual representations, as well as create interactive web-based visualization dashboards. This workshop will focus on using Tableau Public to create data visualizations, starting with an overview of how the program thinks about data, common data manipulation and loading, and the terminology used. Activities will include a sample data visualization and mapping project, which will give people hands-on experience using Tableau’s basic chart types and dashboard creation tools. We will also discuss publishing to the Tableau Public web server and related services and tools, like the full Tableau Desktop application (free for full-time students).

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

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