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All Library Events

VFF: The Art of a Scientist: Unconventional Collaborations

Friday, September 21, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
Last year, three graduate students in biology and biomedical sciences at Duke began pulling together the worlds of art and science through visualization. Serving as the science communications committee for a graduate student group called Duke INSPIRE, they started forming the idea to bridge these seemingly disparate fields to showcase how they build off of each other. This culminated in an art exhibit that brought the work of scientists from many fields together with visual responses by local artists; as well as some scientists showcasing their art skills. The Art of a Scientist was exhibited in the Rubenstein Art Center at Duke, covered by Smithsonian Magazine, and featured on WUNC. The show drew in a lot of attention, and included outreach events that engaged in audience with both science and art. Currently, several pieces are on display at LaunchBio, and more are planned to move to the Museum of Life and Science. Join these three for a conversation about science and art, and how stunning visuals can capture the imaginations of anyone.

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Building Blocks for Reproducibility: RStudio and Git

Tuesday, September 25, 10:00 AM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

In response to a growing focus on the importance of reproducibility, replication, and transparency in the research endeavor, scholars are adapting their practices and learning new skills and tools. DVS is offering a workshop series that will introduce the concepts, practices and tools that will help increase the reproducibility of your work.

In this hands-on workshop you will discover how to harness two specific tools: git and RStudio, to support the execution of more reproducible research projects. Git is a powerful version control system. RStudio is an open-source data science platform/ecosystem supporting reproducible analysis and report generation.

To fully participate in this workshop, please bring your own laptop. This workshop focuses on the practical aspects of configuring RStudio with Git. A later git workshop will also use RStudio and Git to teach more advanced git features and social coding with GitHub/GitLab.

Prerequisite: Intro to R. All attendees are expected to be basically familiar with the R Studio environment.

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Learning Technologies Lunch and Learn: Time-savers in Sakai

Tuesday, September 25, 12:00 PM
Bostock 024
West Campus

Do you need an easy way to take attendance for your course? Or need students to sign up for a specific time their group will meet? Come to this session to learn about the Attendance tool, the Sign-up Tool, and a few more useful tools in Sakai that can save you time.

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Adobe Illustrator for Diagrams

Tuesday, September 25, 1:00 PM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

In this workshop, you will learn the basics of using Adobe Illustrator, the professional standard in vector graphics software for creating diagrams and infographics. Many people avoid using it because of its steep learning curve, but you will see that it is quite easy to combine simple shapes to create interesting and clear diagrams, and to give all your work that professional edge. There are no prerequisites.

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Faculty TechFair

Wednesday, September 26, 11:00 AM
Technology Engagement Center (TEC)
West Campus

OIT is hosting an open-house TechFair for faculty, instructors, and researchers September 26, from 11-2pm at the Technology Engagement Center (TEC). Come for demos, food and to learn quick tips about technology resources for teaching and learning on campus. Featured services include virtual computing, research computing, 3D printing, virtual reality, Learning Innovation services, faculty software and more. No RSVP required, just stop by. However if you would like to participate in a virtual reality or 3D printing demo, please register for these 30 minute workshops.

Please note: There is limited parking on campus and all lots require a parking pass. Please use a departmental parking pass, carpool, or plan to use the new Duke downtown shuttle.

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Story Maps

Wednesday, September 26, 1:00 PM
Perkins 218
West Campus

This workshop will help you get started telling stories with maps using the Esri Story Map platform. This easy-to-use application integrates maps with narrative text, images, and videos to provide a powerful communication tool for any project with a geographic component. We will explore the capabilities of Story Maps, share best practices for designing effective stories, and guide participants through the process of creating their own Story Map.

Attendees will need to bring a laptop computer.

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SSRI~ Workshop: Using NVivo 12 for Qualitative Analysis of Text

Wednesday, September 26, 2:00 PM
SSRI-Gross Hall 230E
West Campus
This workshop will introduce researchers to the basics of NVivo 12, a qualitative data analysis software. Participants will learn strategies for analyzing text-based data in NVivo, such as transcribed interviews and focus groups, documents, and literature. Topics will include how to import data, create nodes and code, tips for formatting transcriptions, and basic queries and visualizations. This workshop will cover NVivo in both the PC and the Mac environment. Registration required; please click "more information" to access the registration form.

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Archiving 101: Learn How to Archive Your Student Group's Records!

Wednesday, September 26, 5:30 PM
Rubenstein Library 150
West Campus

Archiving your student group’s records is a great way to preserve your legacy – but how exactly do you archive stuff? In this workshop, the staff of the Duke University Archives will walk you through the archiving process (including how electronic stuff is archived!) and help you develop an archiving plan for your group. We’ll also play student group BINGO with real documents archived by past student groups! Pizza will be served following the workshop.

**This workshop is intended for undergraduate and graduate student members of Duke student groups.**

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Low-Maintenance Book Club: Selections from Difficult Women

Wednesday, September 26, 5:30 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Kick off the new school year with us at our upcoming meeting on Wednesday, September 26th, from 5:30-7pm. We'll be reading selections from award-winning novelist and essayist Roxane Gay's Difficult Women, her debut collection of short fiction.

Although we'll plan to discuss "I Will Follow You," "Difficult Women" and "North Country," you should feel free to read as much or as little (we are low-maintenance, after all) of the work as you'd like.

We are also featuring a giveaway--the first ten people to RSVP for the meeting will receive a free copy of the book!

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Streamline Course Content in Sakai with Lessons

Thursday, September 27, 11:00 AM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

Have you ever wanted to have more control of how students experience your course content in Sakai? Or provide more context around your assignments or other activities in the site? Consider using Lessons to present your course material in a more structured and streamlined manner to your students. Lessons allows instructors to create pages in Sakai that can link to files in Resources, specific assignments or quizzes, and forum posts.

This workshop will cover how to use Lessons, and best practices for organizing course content.

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Fostering a Thriving and Engaging Environment for Your Students

Thursday, September 27, 12:00 PM
Other (see event description)
West Campus

This workshop, the first in the 2018 Faculty Advancement and Success (FAS) Series from the Office of Faculty Advancement, will focus on strategies to increase the engagement of students from all backgrounds with their instructors, peers, and course content.

Moderator: Andrew Janiak, Ph.D., Bass Fellow, Chair & Professor of Philosophy

Panelists/Speakers:
Anna Gassman-Pines, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Public Policy, Psychology, & Neuroscience
Dorian Canelas, Ph.D., Associate Professor of the Practice of Chemistry
Mark Anthony Neal, Ph.D., Chair & James B. Duke Professor of African and African American Studies

Workshop location: Gray Building 229 (York Reading Room)

Please register in advance. Lunch will be provided.

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Balancing Teaching and Scholarly Productivity

Thursday, September 27, 1:30 PM
Other (see event description)
East Campus

Teaching takes time and energy, two of faculty's most precious and limited resources. In this workshop, faculty will discuss how to direct their time and energy to promote learning while also making time for their other responsibilities (especially writing).

Participants will:

  1. Track how they are spending their time and energy on teaching;
  2. Assess the effectiveness of these choices for student learning;
  3. Discover principles and strategies that enhance efficiency and learning.

Workshop leader: Dr. Monique Dufour, an award-winning teacher with extensive experience in faculty development.

Space is limited. RSVP to Vanessa Turnier (vrt@duke.edu) by September 25.

Location: East Duke Building, Pink Parlor Room

This event is co-sponsored by the Faculty Write Program, an initiative of the Thompson Writing Program, and Learning Innovation.

The Faculty Write Program helps advance faculty as writers through workshops, retreats, writing groups, and individual consultations. Please visit the website for more information: faculty write.duke.edu.

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VFF: Teaching Computing via Visualization

Friday, September 28, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
The following is not a particularly controversial statement: "In order to create a data visualization using [software/language], you first need to learn that [software/language]." But if one of the more exciting things you can do with [software/language] is data visualization, why not start learning [software/language] by learning to build data visualizations? In this talk we present a data-centric approach to teaching and learning R through creating data visualizations, as opposed to starting with fundamentals of R as a programming language. The talk will feature examples of in class activities, details of a curriculum that introduces students to data science through data visualization, and sample student work.

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R Markdown: tips for authoring reproducible documents, slide presentations, web dashboards and more

Tuesday, October 2, 10:00 AM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

Learn how to use this lightweight markup language to compose reproducible reports in many formats: MS Word, PDF, R Notebooks, Web Pages, Slide Presentations, and more.

This exerpience-based learning workshop will help you master literate coding techniques for a whole new level of productivity through reproducibility. The workshop will use the RStudio IDE to introduce and reinforce concepts. Gain practical knowledge intergrating analysis code chunks with your report analysis and prose. Write once, report often while reducing effort and errors.

Prerequisite: Intro to R. All attendees are expected to have a familiarity with R, RStudio, and the Tidyverse.

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BRITE Ideas: Student Learning Dispositions: What are they, how we can measure them, and what are the implications for teaching?

Tuesday, October 2, 12:00 PM
Rubenstein Library 249 (Carpenter Conference Room)
West Campus

Learning is not simply a function of cognition, rather, learning is mediated and moderated by a range of beliefs and emotions. Join Julie Reynolds, Associate Professor of the Practice, Biology, as we explore how teaching techniques can impact these learning dispositions in positive and negative ways. Various personal dimensions, particularly motivation, self-efficacy beliefs, and epistemic beliefs, can change in response to teaching and affect student learning. Reynolds will also share her research, which has considered the combined contribution of these dimensions to student learning in the context of disciplinary writing. BRITE Ideas is a monthly teaching and research series event and is cosponsored by BRITE Lab and Duke Learning Innovation.

Please feel free to bring your lunch. Light refreshments will be provided.

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Introduction to Stata

Tuesday, October 2, 1:00 PM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

Introduction to Stata focuses on the core concepts of using Stata. This workshop provides a hands on overview of how to load, manage, and analyze data using Stata. The workshop will also include a brief introduction to Stata graphics as well. No previous experience with Stata is required.

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Humanities and STEM at Duke: A Conversation on Teaching and Learning

Tuesday, October 2, 3:00 PM
Rubenstein Library 153 (Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room)
West Campus

A new national academies report on the integration of the humanities and arts with STEM says that interleaving these disciplines is crucial. Pamela L. Jennings, a professor of Art and Design at North Carolina State University and a contributor to the report, joins with Duke faculty Paul Bendich and Priscilla Wald for a panel discussion of the future of humanities, STEM and learning at Duke.

The panel will examine what integration of the sciences and the humanities looks like, how humanities and STEM collaborations can be integrated in the curriculum and the co-curriculum, as well as ideas for allowing students to participate in Duke’s interdisciplinary culture.

Moderated by: Maria LaMonaca Wisdom, Director of Graduate Student Advising and Engagement for the Humanities, Duke Graduate School

Panelists:

  • Pamela L. Jennings, Professor and Head of the Department of Art + Design, North Carolina State University;
  • Paul L. Bendich, Associate Research Professor in the Department of Mathematics, Duke University; and
  • Priscilla Wald, R. Florence Brinkley Professor of English, Duke University.

Light refreshments will be served.

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Data Management 101 for Humanists

Wednesday, October 3, 1:00 PM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

Humanists work with various media, content and materials (sources) as part of their research. These sources can be considered data. This workshop will introduce data management practices for humanities researchers to consider and apply throughout the research lifecycle. Good data management practices pertaining to planning, organization, documentation, storage and backup, sharing, citation, and preservation will be presented through a humanities lens with discipline-based, concrete examples. While general good data management practices are relevant across disciplines, participants working specifically within the humanities are the intended audience for this workshop.

This workshop is eligible for 2 hours of RCR credits.

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Data Management 101 for Humanists

Wednesday, October 3, 1:00 PM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

Humanists work with various media, content and materials (sources) as part of their research. These sources can be considered data. This workshop will introduce data management practices for humanities researchers to consider and apply throughout the research lifecycle. Good data management practices pertaining to planning, organization, documentation, storage and backup, sharing, citation, and preservation will be presented through a humanities lens with discipline-based, concrete examples. While general good data management practices are relevant across disciplines, participants working specifically within the humanities are the intended audience for this workshop.

more information »

SSRI~ Workshop: Using Excel to organize and analyze information and data and to present findings

Wednesday, October 3, 3:00 PM
SSRI-Gross Hall 270
This workshop provides an overview of ways Excel can be used to structure and even analyze data and to create presentations. It starts with examining basic tools and functions in Excel (including ways that Excel can be used to manage textual data, to combine or divide data cells and sources, and to perform calculations such as sum, average, minimum, and maximum). It then proceeds to an overview of how to sort and transpose data and create graphs and tables. Finally, it reviews how to perform basic statistical operations, including counts, frequencies, and even simple linear regressions, in Excel. Registration required; please click "more information" to access the registration form.

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SSRI~ Workshop: Qualitative Data Collection & Management

Wednesday, October 3, 3:00 PM
SSRI-Gross Hall 270
Qualitative Data Collection & Management-This workshop provides an introduction to a range of qualitative research methods as well as an overview of the strengths and weaknesses of each approach. Qualitative research methods, including in-depth interviews, focus groups, archival analysis, and participant observation, vary considerably in the resources and time required to execute them reliably, and in the types of data they generate. Which data collection techniques are appropriate to which kinds of research questions and projects, and how do you execute these methods well? How are issues of reliability and validity considered and weighed in qualitative research? We will also explore different ways of managing your data prior to commencing data collection in order to facilitate the transition to data analysis. Some time will be given to the role of NVivo software in facilitating data management and preparing for data analysis. Registration required; please click "more information" to access the registration form.

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Creating Infographics in PowerPoint

Thursday, October 4, 9:00 AM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

The “infographics” style of presenting information and telling visual stories is popular both for internal reporting and for trying to reach and teach the general public. There are many desktop and online tools that can be used to compose static infographics, but we will focus on Microsoft PowerPoint because so many people have free access to it on campus and already have some comfort with it as a visual communications tool. This workshop will give a brief introduction to graphic design and storytelling principles, as well as hands-on practice with using PowerPoint to create charts, icons and other vector shapes to combine with text and visualizations to tell compelling and eye-catching data stories. There are no prerequisites, but some experience using PowerPoint will be helpful.

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Humanities and STEM at Duke: Crucial Questions Mixer

Thursday, October 4, 3:00 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

A new national academies report on the integration of the humanities and arts with STEM says that interleaving these disciplines is crucial. Faculty and students are invited to exchange ideas about what the future of Humanities and STEM collaborations and integration into the curriculum could be, and meet others for networking on future interdisciplinary projects.

The session will include an active exercise to collect ideas that faculty and students can implement in their own disciplines followed by a cocktail mixer inspired by the integration of science and art, where students and faculty can connect with each other on possible research and course projects.

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Ethics and Visualization

Monday, October 8, 10:00 AM
Rubenstein Library 349 (Breedlove Conference Room)
West Campus

Data visualization is an increasingly important skill for researchers in all disciplines, but it is easy to focus more on the mechanics of creating visualizations than on how visualizations relate to ethics. This session introduces participants to core ideas in the ethics of visualization - designing to avoid distortion, designing ethically for broad user communities, developing empathy for people represented within the data, and using reproducibility to increase the transparency of design. This workshop does not require a laptop. (This workshop offers RCR credit.)

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Digital Publishing: Multimodal Storytelling

Monday, October 8, 10:00 AM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

This workshop will provide an overview of common options for publishing sound and video on the Web, focusing on the benefits of various platforms, licensing and rights issues, accessibility issues to consider, and methods of integrating multiple media into research publications. Platforms and tools will include Vimeo, YouTube, SoundCloud, and, for presenting materials in an interactive timeline, Sway and Tableau story feature. Participants will be able to match their digital research with appropriate platforms for public dissemination and will realize the strengths, limitations, and legal issues of various platforms.

Format: This two-hour workshop is meant to promote and engage discussion around students’ specific digital publishing concerns. Consequently, attendance is capped at 15 students, and participants will be asked to share their specific interests and needs ahead of time, to help ensure that presentation examples and discussion points are sufficiently relevant. Sessions will provide numerous examples (projects and tools) to help illustrate key points.

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Research Impact Concepts and Tools

Monday, October 8, 1:00 PM
Rubenstein Library 349 (Breedlove Conference Room)
West Campus

Research impact is defined as how broadly scholarly research is being read, discussed, and used both inside and outside of the academy. It can help you assess how your research is impacting your field. This workshop is designed to help you, as graduate students, better understand how research impact is currently measured and outline Duke’s resources for assessing impact, from Web of Science to Altmetric Explorer. The workshop will include hands-on exploration of research impact tools, so please bring your laptop to participate.

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Digital Publishing: Reaching and Engaging Audiences

Monday, October 8, 1:00 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Who are the intended users of your digital publication? How can you reach new audiences and keep your existing audiences actively engaged? We'll learn about some of the ways successful projects connect with their users and promote their work to potential audiences. We’ll also consider how to effectively and ethically involve and credit audience involvement in one’s research and do a quick overview of some annotation tools that foster this kind of engagement (e.g., VideoAnt, StoryMap, Genius, Hypothes.is). Participants will leave this session with a solid grounding in the ethical and logistical dimensions of engaging audiences and incorporating audience involvement into their own publication practices.

Format: This two-hour workshop is meant to promote and engage discussion around students’ specific digital publishing concerns. Consequently, attendance is capped at 15 students, and participants will be asked to share their specific interests and needs ahead of time, to help ensure that presentation examples and discussion points are sufficiently relevant. We will provide numerous examples (projects and tools) to help illustrate key points.

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Text/Data (RCR Days): Acquiring and Preparing a Corpus of Texts

Tuesday, October 9, 10:00 AM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

This workshop focuses on the technical dimensions of corpus development. Using an array of printed matter -- from digital facsimiles of incunabula to modern letterpress/offset books -- we will explore the risks and benefits of optical character recognition (OCR); file formatting and naming issues; organization strategies for large corpora; and problems of data cleaning and preparation. We will also look at some common sources for textual research data, such as Project Gutenberg, the Internet Archive, and Google Books. While this session will not examine legal issues in detail, we will discuss some common legal concerns around the use of textual corpora.

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An introduction to the teaching and assessment of undergraduate writing

Tuesday, October 9, 11:30 AM
Rubenstein Library 249 (Carpenter Conference Room)
West Campus

Presenter: Professor Cary Moskovitz, Director of Writing in the Disciplines, Thompson Writing Program

Many of Duke's academic programs have identified written communication as one of their primary student learning outcomes. Across our academic curricula and co-curricula, there's a broad commitment to teaching writing as a tool for reflection, analysis, and communication. This session introduces key concepts for teaching writing in the disciplines: articulating objectives, constructing appropriate writing tasks, giving effective feedback, developing sound evaluative methods, aligning writing skills development across courses in a program, realistic considerations of faculty labor, and others.

Departments and programs that are ready to engage more deeply in developing plans for addressing undergraduate student writing will be encouraged to continue their consultations with Professor Moskovitz throughout the year, as they are able.

This session is part of the monthly Assessment Roundtable organized by the Trinity College Office of Assessment.

A light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP in advance.

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Text/Data (RCR Days): Topic Modeling and Document Classification with MALLET

Tuesday, October 9, 1:00 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Participants in this session will acquire a general understanding of topic modeling, the automated analysis technique often referred to as "text mining." Topic modeling can refer to a number of different algorithms, which are computationally intensive and mathematically complex. To facilitate a hands-on approach with a focus on process, this workshop uses the open-source MALLET toolkit as a platform for exploring topic modeling with LDA (Latent Dirichlet Allocation) and will not offer a comparison of algorithms. In addition to topic modeling, this session introduces the concepts of sequence labeling and automated document classification, both of which are also possible with MALLET.

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"Shaping Your Professional Identity Online" RCR Graduate Student Workshop

Tuesday, October 9, 3:00 PM
Rubenstein Library 349 (Breedlove Conference Room)
West Campus

The digital world allows us to connect in ever increasing ways. As an early career scholar these connections can provide you with both opportunities and challenges. This workshop is designed to help you consider the best ways to navigate how you want to present yourself online. We will discuss topics such as what to share and how to share, the ethical issues involved, and how to maintain the right balance of privacy. We will also examine some steps you can take, such as creating a profile on Google Scholar, creating a Google alert for your name, creating an ORCID ID, interacting professionally on Twitter, and creating an online portfolio. If you have a laptop, you may want to bring it. You will receive RCR credit for attending.

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SSRI~ Workshop: Qualitative Data Analysis

Wednesday, October 10, 3:00 PM
SSRI-Gross Hall 270
This workshop will allow students to transform interview transcripts into analyzable data, and to learn foundational skills in qualitative data analysis, including a brief introduction to using NVivo software. Participants will be introduced to the most common coding strategies deployed in social science to analyze data collected through in-depth interviews, focus groups, participant observation, and/or archival analyses of text. A section of the workshop will be dedicated to taking questions regarding coding in the individual research projects of participants. Registration required; please click "more information" to access the registration form.

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Tidy Data in Python with JupyterLab

Thursday, October 11, 9:00 AM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

Python can be a great option for exploration, analysis and visualization of tabular data, like spreadsheets and CSV files, if you know which tools to use and how to get started. This workshop will take you through some practical examples of using Python and the Pandas module to load data, transform it into a standard “tidy” format, and visualize it with Seaborn (or another similar module). We will also introduce you to working in JupyterLab, the exiting new flexible programming environment which will eventually replace Jupyter Notebooks.

There are no prerequisites for this workshop – familiarity with the Python programming language is not required, but you will probably find it easier to follow if you have a little coding experience since we will not be giving an overview of the language itself. Instead, the focus will be on learning how to use the language through conceptual understanding and recipes for specific, commonly-useful tasks.

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Map Design

Thursday, October 11, 1:30 PM
Perkins 218
West Campus

Making maps is a creative rather than a purely technical process. Even if you can expertly use the latest and most advanced tools, you still have to make design decisions based on your specific audience, data, and goals. This workshop will present an overview of concepts in cartography and provide practical techniques for creating effective, visually appealing maps. We will explore design principles by analyzing plenty of examples. No specific software experience or GIS knowledge is required.

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Faculty Bookwatch: "Images at Work: The Material Culture of Enchantment"

Thursday, October 11, 5:00 PM
Smith Warehouse, Ahmadieh Family Lecture Hall, Bay 4, C105
Please RSVP at imagesatwork.eventbrite.com Please join the Franklin Humanities Institute and Duke University Libraries for a Faculty Bookwatch panel on David Morgan's "Images at Work: The Material Culture of Enchantment" (Oxford University Press, 2018). This book explores our interaction with images and other objects as a form of enchantment--whether they are the ones motivating, inspiring, terrifying or seducing us, or we are seeking to use them (or destroy them) in order to act upon the world. David Morgan is Professor of Religious Studies with a secondary appointment in the Department of Art, Art History, and Visual Studies at Duke. He also chairs the Department of Religious Studies at Duke. Panelists include: Jennifer W. Knust, Professor, Department of Religion, Boston Univeristy Justin McDaniel, Professor, Department of Religious Studies, University of Pennsylvania Alicia Jiménez, Assistant Professor, Department of Classical Studies, Duke University Thomas Robisheaux, Professor, Department of History, Duke University Faculty Bookwatch celebrates and promotes interdisciplinary conversations on major recent books by Duke humanities or interpretative social sciences faculty. Each Bookwatch program brings together a panel of distinguished colleagues giving brief comments on the significance and impact of the featured book. The author also participates in the panel and the Q&A. A reception and book sale follows the event.

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Visualization Friday Forum

Friday, October 12, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend.

more information »

“Can I Be Of Any Help?”: An Interactive Theater Performance About Managing Conflicts Around Social Identities in the College Classroom

Monday, October 15, 3:00 PM
Other (see event description)
West Campus

This interactive theater performance by local company Theater Delta addresses conflicts rooted in racism, sexism and homophobia as they may appear in the classroom. Attendees will observe a scene involving social conflicts in a classroom setting and then have an opportunity to interact with the characters involved to explore the implications of such conflicts and how to manage them in ways that promote equity and inclusion while supporting open dialogue.

A reception will follow for continued discussion.

Venue: Social Sciences Building, Room 136

more information »

Building Blocks for Reproducibility: GitHub and GitLab

Tuesday, October 16, 10:00 AM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

In response to a growing focus on the importance of reproducibility, replication, and transparency in the research endeavor, scholars are adapting their practices and learning new skills and tools. DVS is offering a workshop series that will introduce the concepts, practices and tools that will help increase the reproducibility of your work.

GitHub and GitLab are social coding platforms which enable collaboration. Built upon the Git (version control) framework these tools make social coding and code sharing more accessible. Learn how to create branches, create remote repositories, leverage the GitHub/GitLab interface for simpler "reverts", and collaborate with others.

To fully participate in this workshop, please bring your own laptop. This workshop requires that you have already configured RStudio with Git, a topic covered on Sept. 25.

Prerequisite: RStudio and Git. All attendees are expected to be familiar with the R Studio environment (See Intro to R).

more information »

We Are Duke: Exploring Student Diversity on Campus

Tuesday, October 16, 10:00 AM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Duke is home to a diverse student community in terms of racial and ethnic identities, socio-economic backgrounds, religious traditions, and LGBTQ identities. During this session Justin Clapp, Director for Access and Outreach and director of the David M. Rubenstein Scholars program, will present information about student diversity at Duke. Student panelists will also share their own experiences navigating issues related to diversity in and out of the classroom.

Light refreshments will be provided.

more information »

Designing Assignments and Courses with Equity in Mind

Wednesday, October 17, 12:00 PM
Rubenstein Library 153 (Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room)
West Campus

Join faculty who have participated in the "Teaching for Equity Fellows" Program for a hands-on workshop as they provide examples of how they’ve modified their assignments and syllabi or created new courses and programs based on what they have learned from the Fellowship. They will discuss their modifications, how they work together to further improve their courses, and help participants revise their own materials.

Participants will

  1. learn how to identify equity learning outcomes in their own courses;
  2. align outcomes with assignments and course materials;
  3. get feedback on their own materials.

Presenters:

  • Jennifer Ahern-Dodson, Assistant Professor of the Practice, Thompson Writing Program
  • David Malone, Professor of the Practice, Education
  • Jayne O. Ifekwunigwe, Visiting Associate Professor, Social Science Research Institute
  • Alyssa Perz, Academic Dean, and Lecturer, Biology

Lunch will be provided.

more information »

SSRI~ Workshop: Teamwork in NVivo

Wednesday, October 17, 2:00 PM
SSRI-Gross Hall 230E
West Campus
This workshop will introduce researchers to the basics collaborating in NVivo, a qualitative data analysis software. Participants will learn strategies for working as a team with NVivo, how to manage data and files, compare coding, and establish intercoder reliability. Windows and Mac users welcome, however please be aware that limitations exist if you are collaborating cross-platform. Registration required; please click "more information" to access the registration form.

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SSRI~ Workshop: Designing Survey Questionnaires and Survey Experiments

Wednesday, October 17, 3:00 PM
SSRI-Gross Hall 270
This workshop examines question wording and questionnaire design for online and paper questionnaires. This course does not include programming (which is offered in the separate Qualtrics workshop), but focuses on the conceptual issues and considerations underpinning questionnaire design, question wording, and response options. This workshop also provides an introduction to conducting survey experiments, including a brief motivation for when and why to use an experiment, common experimental designs, constructing experimental manipulations, and analysis. Registration required; please click "more information" to access the registration form.

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Current Events in the Classroom: What to Say and How to Say It

Thursday, October 18, 2:00 PM
Rubenstein Library 153 (Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room)
West Campus

Paul James, Assistant Vice President in Duke’s Office for Institutional Equity, will lead this participatory workshop on teaching in the aftermath of difficult community events. The session will explore how to handle classroom discussion when difficult, tragic or contentious current events happen within the Duke community or nationally. Attendees will consider whether to address such issues during class time, how to facilitate such discussions if they occur and how to support student learning during such events.

Light refreshments will be provided.

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Visualization Friday Forum

Friday, October 19, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend.

more information »

Eliminating Achievement Gaps Through Data and Analytics

Friday, October 19, 3:00 PM
Other (see event description)
West Campus

By implementing a series of student-centered and analytics-informed programs, Georgia State University in Atlanta has raised graduation rates by 22 percentage points and closed all achievement gaps based on race, ethnicity, income-level and first-generation status. It now awards more bachelor’s degrees to African Americans than any other college or university in the nation.

Tim Renick, Vice President for Enrollment Management and Student Success, Vice Provost, and Professor of Religious Studies at Georgia State University, will describe how Georgia State achieved this notable success.

Through a discussion of innovations ranging from chatbots and predictive analytics to meta-majors and completion grants, the session will cover lessons learned from Georgia State’s transformation and outline several practical steps that campuses can take to improve outcomes for underserved students.

A reception will follow for continued discussion.

Venue: Ahmadieh Family Auditorium (Gross Hall 107)

For visitors coming from off-campus: The closest visitor parking to this event is available in the Bryan Center pay parking lot or the Bryan Center Parking Garage (Parking Garage IV) adjacent to the Bryan Center, accessed from Science Drive. The event is in Gross Hall, at the intersection of Towerview Drive and Science Drive, on Duke West Campus.

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Mapping with R

Tuesday, October 23, 1:00 PM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

R has become a popular and reproducible option for supporting spatial and statistical analysis. This hands-on workshop will demonstrate how to plot x/y coordinates; how to generate thematic chloropleths with US Census and other federal data; import shapefiles; and create interactive maps on the web.

Prerequisite: Intro to R. All attendees are expected to be basically familiar with R, R Studio, and the Tidyverse.

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Study Abroad as Service Learning: Supporting Refugee Learners in Berlin

Tuesday, October 23, 3:30 PM
Rubenstein Library 249 (Carpenter Conference Room)
West Campus

In summer 2018, Duke students had the unique opportunity to participate in a new global education program in Berlin that combined academic study of the cultural and geopolitical implications of migration to Europe from the Middle East with an internship with Kiron Open Higher Education, an NGO that offers open access digital education to refugees. The program was led by Erdag Göknar, Associate Professor in Duke's Asian and Middle Eastern Studies program, and Banu Gökariksel, Associate Professor of Geography at UNC.

Göknar and Gökariksel will join Matthew Rascoff, who leads the Learning Innovation team that supported the design of this program, and students from the program, to discuss the value of being immersed both intellectually and professionally in the topic of migration and refugees in Europe.

Light refreshments will be provided.

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Foundations of Engagement: Fostering Ethical Community-Based Learning and Research

Wednesday, October 24, 12:00 PM
Rubenstein Library 349 (Breedlove Conference Room)
West Campus

Are good intentions enough? Is service the best response? How prepared are you to make the changes you want to see in the world?

These are just a few of the questions we encourage students to consider throughout their community-engaged experiences. Join Leslie Parkins and Lindsey Miller from Duke’s Office of Civic Engagement for a modified version of the Foundations of Engagement student workshop, which explores issues around identity and positionality, power and partnerships and root causes from a faculty perspective.

Participants will come away with new questions to challenge students to think more deeply about community engagement and will learn how this offering can supplement curricular or co-curricular learning experiences.

Lunch will be provided.

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SSRI~ Workshop: Designing Survey Questionnaires and Survey Experiments

Wednesday, October 24, 3:00 PM
SSRI-Gross Hall 270
This workshop examines question wording and questionnaire design for online and paper questionnaires. This course does not include programming (which is offered in the separate Qualtrics workshop), but focuses on the conceptual issues and considerations underpinning questionnaire design, question wording, and response options. This workshop also provides an introduction to conducting survey experiments, including a brief motivation for when and why to use an experiment, common experimental designs, constructing experimental manipulations, and analysis. Registration required; please click "more information" to access the registration form.

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SSRI~ Workshop: Introduction to Qualtrics Survey Software

Wednesday, October 24, 3:00 PM
SSRI-Gross Hall 270
This workshop offers an introduction to Qualtrics survey software, a package available (at no cost to researchers) for use across Duke's campus and medical center. This powerful, easy-to-use system is a great way to collect information online, whether as part of a research protocol or for administrative purposes such as program evaluation. This workshop will introduce participants to the Qualtrics system, demonstrate how to set up an account, create a questionnaire and access its results. It will also cover some basic tools that can be used to customize the questionnaire to fit your needs, such as using display and skip logic to collect more detailed information from a subset of your audience. The workshop is taught through the Duke Initiative on Survey Methodology (DISM) in collaboration with the Duke Office of Information Technology (OIT). Participants will receive a very brief overview of the consulting and other services DISM offers to help Duke researchers develop and conduct surveys. Registration required; please click "more information" to access the registration form.

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A Conversation with Legendary Book Editor Bob Loomis

Wednesday, October 24, 4:00 PM
Rubenstein Library 153 (Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room)
West Campus

Join the Duke University Libraries and Department of English for an informal conversation with Bob Loomis, the legendary Random House editor and Duke alumnus (T ’49), as he discusses the lively literary culture on campus during his post-war undergraduate years.

Loomis’s fellow students included the award-winning authors William Styron, Guy Davenport, and New York Magazine founder Clay Felker. He was also a student of celebrated Duke English Professor William Blackburn.

Refreshments provided. Please register to help us estimate attendance.

Free and open to the public.

Co-sponsored by the Department of English.

More about Bob Loomis:

For more information, contact:

Sara Seten Berghausen, Associate Curator of Collections, Rubenstein Library


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Visualization Friday Forum

Friday, October 26, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend.

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Building Blocks for Reproducibility: Open Science Framework (OSF)

Tuesday, October 30, 10:00 AM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

In response to a growing focus on the importance of reproducibility, replication, and transparency in the research endeavor, scholars are adapting their practices and learning new skills and tools. DVS is offering a workshop series that will introduce the concepts, practices and tools that will help increase the reproducibility of your work.

This workshop will introduce the Open Science Framework (OSF), which is a free, open source project management tool developed and maintained by the Center for Open Science. The OSF can help scholars manage their workflow, organize their materials, and share all or part of a project with the broader research community. This workshop will demonstrate some of the key functionalities of the tool including how to structure your materials, manage permissions, version content, integrate with third-party tools (such as Box, GitHub, or Mendeley), share materials, register projects, and track usage.

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Data Management 101 for Scientists

Wednesday, October 31, 1:00 PM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

Scientists work with lots of data both big and small, and in many formats and systems. This workshop will introduce data management practices for scientists to consider and apply throughout the research lifecycle. Good data management practices pertaining to planning, organization, documentation, storage and backup, sharing, citation, and preservation will be presented through a sciences lens using discipline-based, concrete examples. While good general data management practices are relevant across disciplines, participants working specifically within the sciences are the intended audience for this workshop.

This workshop is eligible for 2 hours of RCR credits.

more information »

SSRI~ Workshop: Introduction to Qualtrics Survey Software

Wednesday, October 31, 3:00 PM
SSRI-Gross Hall 270
This workshop offers an introduction to Qualtrics survey software, a package available (at no cost to researchers) for use across Duke's campus and medical center. This powerful, easy-to-use system is a great way to collect information online, whether as part of a research protocol or for administrative purposes such as program evaluation. This workshop will introduce participants to the Qualtrics system, demonstrate how to set up an account, create a questionnaire and access its results. It will also cover some basic tools that can be used to customize the questionnaire to fit your needs, such as using display and skip logic to collect more detailed information from a subset of your audience. The workshop is taught through the Duke Initiative on Survey Methodology (DISM) in collaboration with the Duke Office of Information Technology (OIT). Participants will receive a very brief overview of the consulting and other services DISM offers to help Duke researchers develop and conduct surveys. Registration required; please click "more information" to access the registration form.

more information »

SSRI~ Workshop: Effective Survey Design for Online, Paper, and Mixed-Mode Questionnaires

Wednesday, October 31, 3:00 PM
SSRI-Gross Hall 270
This workshop examines questionnaire design for online and paper questionnaires, such as screen layout and appearance, the use of images, and other aspects of the user interface which affect the accuracy of survey results. This course does not include programming, but focuses on the conceptual issues and considerations underpinning questionnaire design for online and paper designs. It also considers the design issues involved in combing such modes can be combined with other data collection modes, i.e., in-person or telephone. Registration required; please click "More Information" below to access the registration form.

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Arabic Medicine Conquers Latin Europe, 1050-1300: Methods and Motives

Thursday, November 1, 12:00 AM
Rubenstein Library Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room 153
The Kenan Institute and the Duke Library will hold a two-day symposium on 1-2 November 2018 entitled "Arabic Medicine Conquers Latin Europe, 1050-1300: Methods and Motives," showing how the accomplished Arabic medical writings of the medieval Middle East and Spain were discovered, translated, and assimilated by a previously wholly unsophisticated European world. The symposium will mark the opening of the exhibition of Arabic medical manuscripts at Perkins Library. A keynote lecture by Prof. Cristina Alvarez Millán of the UNED (Madrid), "Arabic Medicine in the World of Classical Islam: Growth and Achievement" will open the symposium and exhibition on the evening of November 1. A reception will follow. On Friday, November 2, two panels will track the astonished Europeans as they encounter and assimilated that medicine.

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VFF: Insight Without Sight: Exploring charts and graphs using sonification

Friday, November 2, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
Data visualization is inherently visual. Does that mean people with visual impairments or blindness are out of luck? Not anymore. Join Ed Summers, Director of Accessibility at SAS, for a demonstration of DIY tools for non-visual access to tables, charts, and graphs.

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BRITE Ideas: Monthly Teaching and Research Series

Tuesday, November 6, 12:00 PM
Rubenstein Library 249 (Carpenter Conference Room)
West Campus

Join BRITE Ideas as we welcome UNC facullty guest Steven G. Buzinski, Teaching Associate Professor, Associate Director of Undergraduate Studies, and Karen M. Gil Internship Director in the Department of Psychology & Neuroscience at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Save the date - details to follow.

Please feel free to bring your lunch. Light refreshments will be provided.

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SSRI~ Workshop: Program Evaluation

Tuesday, November 6, 2:30 PM
SSRI-Gross Hall 270
This workshop offers an overview of program evaluation, or the systematic investigation of the merit, worth, or significance of a program. Topics covered will include: when and why to conduct evaluation; types of evaluations; key aspects of an evaluation, including logic model development, data sources and data collection, analysis and reporting, and guiding resultant programmatic change; and tips for feasibly and effectively implementing evaluation at a program or organization. This workshop focuses on evaluation from the perspective of programs or organizations and will be of particular interest to people working in such settings who are looking to learn more about evaluation, but it is also relevant to undergraduate students, graduate students, faculty, or other researchers who are interested in evaluation and applied research. Registration required; please click "More Information" below to access the registration form.

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Shiny App Development with Dr. Mine Çetinkaya-Rundel

Wednesday, November 7, 10:00 AM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

Shiny is an R package that makes it easy to build interactive web apps straight from R. You can host stand-alone apps on a webpage or embed them in R Markdown documents or build dashboards. This short course will introduce you to building web applications with Shiny, reactive programming, and customizing and deploying your apps for others to use.

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What I Wish I Had Known About Teaching (at Duke)

Wednesday, November 7, 3:00 PM
Perkins 217
West Campus

Learning Innovation invites faculty new to teaching to hear from a panel of award-winning Duke faculty as they share their tips, ideas, and lessons learned from their years of teaching, to encourage and inform instructors who are new to teaching at Duke. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions about the Duke teaching environment during the panel and in the open Q&A.

Audience: New faculty members or others new to teaching at Duke, with 3 years or less teaching experience.

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Finding a Home for Your Data: An Introduction to Archives & Repositories

Thursday, November 8, 1:00 PM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

Publishing and preserving research data within a trusted repository helps researchers comply with funder and journal data sharing policies, supports the discovery of and access to data, and can result in more visibility and higher impact for research projects. This workshop will provide an overview of the different types of repositories and the overall role of repositories within the data sharing landscape. Key repositories in various disciplines will be explored and attendees will learn about resources for locating and assessing repositories. Attendees will also have an opportunity to locate appropriate repositories for their own research.

This workshop is eligible for 2 hours of RCR credits.

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Visualization Friday Forum

Friday, November 9, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend.

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Excellence in teaching: Supporting graduate student instructors

Monday, November 12, 12:00 PM
Rubenstein Library 249 (Carpenter Conference Room)
West Campus

Presenters: Dr. Francisco Ramos, Assistant Dean for Assessment and Evaluation, the Graduate School and Dr. Hugh Crumley, Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs, the Graduate School

Trinity College and the Graduate School are deeply committed to the professional development of graduate students as instructors. Our academic departments share this commitment, and often they request additional guidance to (a) structure graduate student skills development and (b) to assess the degree to which graduate students are developing as effective teachers. This introductory session explores such questions as:

  • What are your learning outcomes for graduate student instructors?
  • What are some useful training models for new graduate student instructors?
  • How might a graduate student instructor self-assess his or her teaching?
  • What are the most effective ways of delivering feedback to graduate students so that they can use it to improve their practice?

This session is part of the monthly Assessment Roundtable organized by the Trinity College Office of Assessment.

A light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP in advance.

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Tidying hierarchical data from the web with Professor Colin Rundel

Tuesday, November 13, 10:00 AM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

Gathering data from the web presents unique challenges to the researcher. Only rarely is the data we need available as a tidy rectangle that can be easily imported and directly analyzed. During this workshop we will discuss some of the common data formats (e.g. json, xml) and data sources (e.g. APIs, web scraping) as well as the tools / packages / best practices for ingesting these data using the R programming language.

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Duke Online Learning Collaborative: ModU

Tuesday, November 13, 3:00 PM
Bostock 024
West Campus

Alexandra Cooper, Associate Director Duke Initiative on Survey Methodology and Jim Speckart present ModU an extensive collection of Duke-created videos focused around different methods and topics in the social sciences.

These meetings are part of the Duke Online Learning Collaborative (formerly the Distance Education Special Interest Group) and open to all in the Duke community with an interest in digital education and online teaching and learning.

more information »

SSRI~ Workshop: Effective Survey Design for Online, Paper, and Mixed-Mode Questionnaires

Tuesday, November 13, 3:00 PM
SSRI-Gross Hall 270
This workshop examines questionnaire design for online and paper questionnaires, such as screen layout and appearance, the use of images, and other aspects of the user interface which affect the accuracy of survey results. This course does not include programming, but focuses on the conceptual issues and considerations underpinning questionnaire design for online and paper designs. It also considers the design issues involved in combing such modes can be combined with other data collection modes, i.e., in-person or telephone. Registration required; please click "More Information" below to access the registration form.

more information »

SSRI~ Workshop: Using Excel to organize and analyze information and data and to present findings

Tuesday, November 13, 3:00 PM
SSRI-Gross Hall 270
This workshop provides an overview of ways Excel can be used to structure and even analyze data and to create presentations. It starts with examining basic tools and functions in Excel (including ways that Excel can be used to manage textual data, to combine or divide data cells and sources, and to perform calculations such as sum, average, minimum, and maximum). It then proceeds to an overview of how to sort and transpose data and create graphs and tables. Finally, it reviews how to perform basic statistical operations, including counts, frequencies, and even simple linear regressions, in Excel. Registration required; please click "more information" to access the registration form.

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Building Blocks for Reproducibility: The TIER Protocol

Wednesday, November 14, 10:00 AM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

In response to a growing focus on the importance of reproducibility, replication, and transparency in the research endeavor, scholars are adapting their practices and learning new skills and tools. DVS is offering a workshop series that will introduce the concepts, practices and tools that will help increase the reproducibility of your work.

This workshop will introduce the TIER Protocol, which outlines a specification and process for maintaining well-organized documentation and producing more reproducible research projects. An example of using the TIER Protocol in conjunction with the Open Science Framework will also be presented.

more information »

Visualization Friday Forum

Friday, November 16, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend.

more information »

BRITE Ideas: How can Data from Large Classrooms Improve Learning?

Tuesday, December 4, 12:00 PM
Rubenstein Library 249 (Carpenter Conference Room)
West Campus

Many classes are growing in enrollment. One way teachers handle this growth is by increasing their use of technology. A concern about these two factors is how they affect the quality of learning. However, they are also an opportunity to collect and analyze large, high-dimensional data sets and conduct in situ experiments at scale. This talk will include both past and new work taking advantage of this scale. First, it will cover the results of applying mixed methods to a corpus of 332,829 wrong answers from students answering code-tracing, constructed-response assessments. Second, it will discuss the findings of using those results in an in situ experiment with over 900 students. This experiment automatically delivered hints while the students answered assessments. Third, this talk will present new work that collects data from multiple class tools and integrates them into a single data analysis pipeline, as well as potential research directions using this data source.

Light refershments will be provided. Please feel free to bring a lunch.

more information »

Visualization Friday Forum

Friday, December 7, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend.

more information »

Duke Online Learning Collaborative

Tuesday, December 11, 3:00 PM
Bostock 024
West Campus

Steve Grambow, a Duke faculty biostatistician, has created and implemented a new training program, Fundamentals of Clinical Research, a blended program model allowing physicians to learn about conducting clinical research. This new program has has been delivered for the first time in China. Grambow will discuss the blended model, digital technologies, lesson and assessment design, and how content was localized to enable better learning. The culmination of this project was a one week highly interactive experience delivered at Beijing Friendship Hospital where participants created and presented a clinical research project working while working in teams.

These meetings are part of the Duke Online Learning Collaborative (formerly the Distance Education Special Interest Group) and open to all in the Duke community with an interest in digital education and online teaching and learning.

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Getting Started with Sakai (for Duke Teaching Assistants)

Monday, January 7, 1:00 PM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

This workshop is designed to give Duke Teaching Assistants (TAs) the knowledge required to create and manage a Sakai course/project site. During the session, we will provide an overview of Sakai basics, including the most commonly used tools and how to navigate the settings of a site. By the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Create and manage a course/project site
  2. Describe commonly used Sakai teaching tools
  3. Understand course organization tools and upload sample materials
  4. Identify key features of the gradebook and understand TA grading permissions

more information »

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