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All Library Events

Distance Education Special Interest Group (DE SIG@Duke)

Tuesday, October 24, 12:00 PM
Bostock 024
West Campus

DE SIG@Duke will host a brown bag lunch discussion and idea exchange on Oct. 24, 2017 on topics ranging from new online program development to innovation at Duke Law. Questions? Contact DE SIG lead Sophia Stone (sophia.stone@duke.edu)

Join us as we welcome guest speakers (in alphabetical order):

  • Jamye Abram, M.Ed., Instructional Technology Coordinator, Educational Innovation & Outreach, Duke Talent Identification Program (Duke TIP), showcases online programs for gifted middle and high school students, including online experiential learning opportunities;

  • Lok Chan, CIT Bass Online Fellow will share online collaboration tools for innovative teaching;

  • Sterling Lyon, M.Ed., Educational Technology Specialist, Doctor of Physical Therapy program discusses new online program development in continuing education;

  • Katherine McDaniel, Ph.D, Duke Graduate Medical Education will provide a program overview and ideas for new opportunities in program development;

  • Rochelle Newton, Ed.D, Senior Manager for Systems & User Services shares innovations at Duke Law

Please bring a lunch; light refreshments provided.

more information »

Intro to ArcGIS Pro

Tuesday, October 24, 1:00 PM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

ArcGIS Pro is a newly designed interface to the tried-and-true ArcGIS desktop software. It has essentially the same functions, but with more of a MS-Office interface. As a native 64-bit program, it also has superior performance. There are a few nice feature enhancements such as multiple layouts in a single project. It's more fully integrated with ArcGIS Online, and users will need to have created an Duke ArcGIS Online account. An administrator will activate your ArcGIS Pro license after you've created an ArcGIS Online account.

ArcGIS Pro can help you analyze or visualize digital data that has a locational component, as well as discuss starting points for obtaining data. Examples will focus on social science data, but attendees are encouraged to ask questions regarding their own needs and will be welcome to make one-on-one appointments later for more focused instruction. It's helpful, but not necessary, to be familiar with ArcGIS Desktop beforehand.

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Consent, Data Sharing and Data Reuse

Tuesday, October 24, 1:00 PM
Perkins 218
West Campus

Research involving humans requires multiple approaches to protect participants’ anonymity. If you are planning to (or are required to) share your human subjects’ data outside of your original project team, or plan to re-use data you collected previously for a new research project, you will need to design a consent form/consent protocol that properly addresses these situations. This workshop will present various research scenarios with examples of how consent protocols should be developed.

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Open Studio

Tuesday, October 24, 1:00 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Drop-in consultations and team work time for digital projects. To reserve a specific appointment time with a Digital Scholarship Services staff member, contact askdigital@duke.edu.

more information »

Shaping Your Professional Identity Online: RCR Graduate Student Workshop

Tuesday, October 24, 3:00 PM
Perkins 217
West Campus

The digital world allows us to connect in ever increasing ways. As an early career scholar these connections can provide you with both opportunities and challenges. This workshop is designed to help you consider the best ways to navigate how you want to present yourself online. We will discuss topics such as what to share and how to share, the ethical issues involved, and how to maintain the right balance of privacy. We will also examine some steps you can take, such as creating a profile on Google Scholar, creating a Google alert for your name, creating an ORCID ID, interacting professionally on Twitter, and creating an online portfolio. If you have a laptop, you may want to bring it. You will receive RCR credit for attending.

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Duke University Library's Low Maintenance Book Club

Tuesday, October 24, 5:00 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Our next book club will be on October 24th at 5:00pm in The Edge Workshop Room @ The Edge. In honor of the Halloween, we will be reading stories by Alyssa Wong, a Duke Alum and Chapel Hill writer who writes fantasy and horror.

We will be reading two short stories and a short comic: Hungry Daughters of Starving Mothers,The Fisher Queen, and The Auntie.

Please RSVP for this discussion. Light refreshments will be served.

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Remembering Kate Millett

Tuesday, October 24, 5:00 PM
Rubenstein Library 153 (Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room)
West Campus

Please join us for a program honoring the memory of feminist writer, artist, and activist Kate Millett (1934-2017) with readings and reflections. Speakers will include Kimberly Lamm, Toril Moi, Kathy Rudy, Naomi Nelson, Sylvia Herbold, Heather McGowan, and others. Light reception preceding remarks at 5:00 p.m. with program to begin at 5:30 p.m.

Co-sponsored by the Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History and Culture; Gender, Sexuality & Feminist Studies; and the Forum for Scholars and Publics.

event image

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Open Studio

Wednesday, October 25, 11:00 AM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Drop-in consultations and team work time for digital projects. To reserve a specific appointment time with a Digital Scholarship Services staff member, contact askdigital@duke.edu.

more information »

Copyright and Open Access in the Humanities

Wednesday, October 25, 12:00 PM
Rubenstein Library 153 (Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room)
West Campus

In publishing, copyright is the legal linchpin around which publishing contracts are negotiated. It forms the basis of the exchange between authors and publishers for negotiations on all sorts of terms about when, where, and how scholarship will be communicated to the world. In recent years, the possibilities for those contract terms have dramatically expanded as digital production and online access have changed the way presses publish and scholars find and interact with scholarship.

Join us on October 25 for a lunchtime discussion about your copyright rights and new publishing options in the humanities, including open online access. We will discuss copyright ownership, contract negotiation, fair use, rights reversions, open access and more. This session will be introduced by three panelists followed by open discussion:

  • Gennifer Weisenfeld, Professor in the Department of Art, Art History, and Visual Studies and Dean of Humanities for Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
  • Cathy Rimer-Surles, Assistant Director for Contracts and Intellectual Property for Duke University Press
  • David Hansen, Director of Copyright and Scholarly Communication for Duke University Libraries

Lunch will be provided. Please register at the link below so we have an accurate count for food and seats.

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What I Wish I Had Known About Teaching (At Duke)

Wednesday, October 25, 3:00 PM
Perkins 217
West Campus

The Center for Instructional Technology invites faculty new to teaching at Duke to hear from a panel of award-winning Duke faculty as they share their tips, ideas, and lessons learned from their years of teaching, to encourage and inform instructors who are new to teaching at Duke. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions about the Duke teaching environment during the panel and in the open Q&A. Faculty new to teaching (at Duke) are encouraged to register and join us for this engaging event!

Audience: New faculty members or others new to teaching at Duke, with 3 years or less teaching experience.

Panel presentation followed by open Q&A session:

  • Edward J. Balleisen, Ph.D., (Vice Provost for Interdisciplinary Studies, and Professor of History and Public Policy)
  • Elizabeth K. Bucholz, Ph.D. (Associate Director of Undergraduate Studies and Assistant Professor of the Practice, Department of Biomedical Engineering)
  • Jules Odendahl-James, Ph.D., MFA (pronouns she, her, hers); (Director of Academic Engagement, Arts & Humanities, Lecturer, Theater Studies)
  • Alyssa K. Perz, Ph.D. (Academic Dean, Trinity College, Director, Cardea Fellows Program, and Lecturer, Department of Biology)

more information »

Race, Medicine, Authorship and the "Discovery" of Sickle Cell Disease in 1910-1911

Wednesday, October 25, 5:00 PM
Rubenstein Library Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room 153
The first two case histories of sickle cell disease appeared in the medical literature within three months of each other in 1910 and 1911. Dr. Savitt will discuss the very divergent stories of the first two sickle-cell patients and their physicians as told against the backdrop of a racially divided America and of a highly competitive scientific community. We see how race and class affected the discovery of SCD and how credit for two discoveries were apportioned. Savitt will also tell about his own "adventures" in tracking down the identities and backgrounds of these first two SCD patients. Dr. Savitt is a historian and professor in the Department of Bioethics and Interdisciplinary Studies in the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University.

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Race, Medicine, Authorship and the ‘Discovery’ of Sickle Cell Disease in 1910-1911

Wednesday, October 25, 5:00 PM
Rubenstein Library 153 (Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room)
West Campus

Please join us on Wednesday, October 25, at 5:00 p.m. for our next Trent History of Medicine Lecture Series event.

We are very pleased to have Todd Savitt, Ph.D., present Race, Medicine, Authorship and the ‘Discovery’ of Sickle Cell Disease in 1910-1911.

The first two case histories of sickle cell disease (SCD) appeared in the medical literature within three months of each other in 1910 and 1911. The very divergent stories of the first two sickle-cell patients and their physicians are told against the backdrop of a racially divided America and of a highly competitive scientific community. Dr. Savitt’s talk will discuss how race and class affected the discovery of SCD and how credit for the two discoveries were apportioned. Dr. Savitt will also talk about his own “adventures” in tracking down the identities and backgrounds of these first two SCD patients.

Dr. Savitt is a medical historian and professor in the Department of Bioethics and Interdisciplinary Studies in the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University.

The talk is free and open to the public. A light reception will follow.

Sponsored by the History of Medicine Collections in the Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

more information »

Designing an award-winning course in Sakai

Thursday, October 26, 9:00 AM
Technology Engagement Center (TEC)
West Campus

Improve your course by using the Apereo Teaching and Learning Awards rubric.

At 9:30, there will be a 15-minute lightning round on DukeExtend (an online learning platform that lets you share your expertise with who you want, when you want) and Cisco Spark (a new tool for synchronously collaborating using a combination of text, multimedia, and video calling), followed by time for Q&A on any of the topics.

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The Audiences of Digital Publishing: Outreach & Engagement [Digital Publishing Workshop]

Thursday, October 26, 10:30 AM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

The flip side of assessment is outreach -- how do you involve users in your project in the first place? How can you reach new audiences and keep your existing audiences actively involved with your work? We'll learn about some of the ways successful projects connect with their users and promote their work to potential audiences.

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Open Pedagogy and Open Access Lightning Talks

Friday, October 27, 11:00 AM
Rubenstein Library 249 (Carpenter Conference Room)
West Campus

Join us for this 15-minute lightning round on Open Pedagogy (innovative teaching and learning practices that are only made possible through the application of open licenses) and Open Access (research articles that are free, immediate, and available online with the rights to use these articles fully in the digital environment), followed by time for Q&A on either topic.

Presenters:

Jolie Tingen, Duke Center for Instructional Technology, Learning Technology Analyst

Haley Walton, Duke University Libraries, Open Access Outreach Coordinator

more information »

Copyright and Teaching Workshop

Friday, October 27, 11:30 AM
Rubenstein Library 249 (Carpenter Conference Room)
West Campus

This session aims to help faculty, staff and students understand the most common copyright and intellectual property issues that arise in teaching and researching. The session will cover copyright and intellectual property basics, reviewing legal restrictions on reuse of material created by others and how contracts and licenses can affect use of research in the classroom, in research, and in other settings. We will also cover challenges associated with access and reuse in the context of both open access and subscription publishing models. The session will be led by:

David Hansen, Director of the Duke University Libraries Office of Copyright and Scholarly Communication

Haley Walton, Duke University Libraries, Open Access Outreach Coordinator

more information »

VFF: Virtual Reality and the Everyday Consumer

Friday, October 27, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
Over the past couple of years, virtual reality has seen quite a resurgence of interest thanks to hardware advances. In addition, augmented and mixed reality technologies have begun to prove themselves useful across various industries. In this talk, I'll discuss how the recent rise of virtual reality arcade storefronts is contributing to the acceptance of these technologies in everyday life. I'll then explore the breadth of applications that are transforming how the average consumer experiences everyday life and how visual representations of everything from business meetings to interior design to music are rapidly becoming immersive.

more information »

Using Online Tools to Build Undergraduate Research Skills [Munch & Mull]

Monday, October 30, 12:00 PM
Rubenstein Library 349 (Breedlove Conference Room)
West Campus

How can online tools improve students’ research skills? Adela Deanova, Duke doctoral candidate in Philosophy, took on that question. As a 2016-2017 Bass Instructional Fellow apprenticing with the Center for Instructional Technology (CIT), she focused on how to build archival research skills while innovating a traditional course. (Read more about Adela and the Bass OA project here: https://cit.duke.edu/blog/2016/12/innovative-teaching-undergraduate-philosophy-bass-online-apprentice-project/).

Adela used the course management tool Sakai (https://sakai.duke.edu/) and the new portfolio tool Pebble Pad (https://portfolio.duke.edu/) to create modular archival research activities for students in Professor Andrew Janiak's Gender and Philosophy course. Creating these smaller, scaffolded tasks and then providing students with a means to digitally publish their work (and instructors an easy way to evaluate that work) offers a novel approach for building students literacy in research methods and digital publishing.

Join us for a brown-bag conversation with Adela about this approach to building undergraduate students’ research skills. Light refreshments will be served. This talk, co-sponsored by CIT, is part of the Munch & Mull Digital Scholarship series.

more information »

Open Studio

Tuesday, October 31, 1:00 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Drop-in consultations and team work time for digital projects. To reserve a specific appointment time with a Digital Scholarship Services staff member, contact askdigital@duke.edu.

more information »

It's Coming: Screamfest V at the Rubenstein Library

Tuesday, October 31, 1:30 PM
Rubenstein Library Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room 153
It's coming, the event so monstrous we're too scared to have it more than once a year... Screamfest.This Halloween, join the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library as we dive into the creepiest, the spookiest, the most coulrophobia-inducing (look it up) collections we have to offer, including: amputation saws perfect for cannibal clowns; paranormal tools for communicating with your missing siblings; and other materials destined to haunt your deepest slumbers.Free open to the public. Come for the free candy, stay for more free candy.But remember, whatever you do, don't take one of the red balloons.

more information »

Open Studio

Wednesday, November 1, 11:00 AM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Drop-in consultations and team work time for digital projects. To reserve a specific appointment time with a Digital Scholarship Services staff member, contact askdigital@duke.edu.

more information »

Currents of Change: Migration, Transit and Outcomes in the Mediterranean

Wednesday, November 1, 12:00 PM
Rubenstein Library Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room 153
Join the Rubenstein Library's Human Rights Archive and the Forum for Scholars and Publics for a dialogue and critical examination of the history of recent immigration in the Mediterranean and its impact on individual, local, and global migration politics, policy, and culture. Our key guest will be Malta-based Darrin Zammit Lupi, an internationally respected and award-winning photojournalist and humanitarian who has been participating in and documenting sea migration in the Mediterranean region for over ten years. Zammit Lupi will be joined by Niels Frenzen, faculty at USC Gould School of Law and an advocate since the 1980s both for migrants crossing the Caribbean and the Mediterranean, and Holly Ackerman, Duke Librarian and scholar on sea migration.

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Problems in Digital Publishing: Data Portability [Digital Publishing Workshop]

Thursday, November 2, 10:30 AM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Making information public with a piece of software is easy. What's less straightforward is how to move that information from one platform to another without losing any of the affordances, metadata, or other attributes attached to it. This session will provide an overview of some common data migration tasks and describe best practices for ensuring that your digital work stays portable and sustainable.

more information »

SSRI~ Workshop: Introduction to SAS Session 1: Data Management

Thursday, November 2, 2:00 PM
SSRI-Gross Hall 230E
West Campus
This workshop offers an overview of the SAS programming language, focusing on data management activities. Session 1 includes a general overview of major SAS components (Program Editor, Log and Output) and the core concepts of SAS programming (DATA and PROC steps). It focuses on the process of importing and modifying data, including issues of importing/exporting data from other file formats, merging and concatenating data sets, and adding to or subsettting from datasets. Key SAS statements described include: PROC IMPORT, SET, MERGE, IF-THEN, and WHERE. Session 2 focuses on data analysis, including variable creation/recoding and descriptive analyses typically used in data management. Key SAS statements described include: PROC CONTENTS, PROC MEANS, and PROC FREQ. Together, these two sessions allow researchers to learn basic data management processes using the SAS statistical system. Registration required; please click "more information" to access the registration form.

more information »

YASAK/BANNED: Print Media and Cultural Spaces from Abdülhamid to Erdogan

Thursday, November 2, 5:00 PM
Rubenstein Library Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room 153
The conference begins Thursday, Nov. 2 at 5:30 PM with a Vernissage of the related Duke libraries exhibit: Yasak/Banned: Political Cartoons from late Ottoman and Republican Turkey (Perkins Library Rare Book Room). At 6:30 PM, Professor Edhem Eldem (Bogaziçi University, History) will present a Keynote entitled, Sultan Abdülhamid II: Founding Father of the Turkish State? in the Bostock Library Holsti-Anderson Room. On Friday, Nov. 3 we will host three conference panels in Holsti-Anderson with local and guest experts: Gender and Media (9 AM), Cultural Spaces from Empire to Republic (11 AM) and Censorship and Political Satire (2:30 PM). The conference will conclude with a Roundtable (4:30 PM). Schedule | Thursday, November 2nd Reception - 5:30 PM Keynote: Edhem Eldem 6:30 PM Schedule | Friday, November 3rd Panel 1: Gender and Media (Facilitator: miriam cooke) Begins at 9:00 AM Irvin Schick Banu Gokariksel Didem Havlioglu Perin Gürel Panel 2: Cultural Spaces from Empire to Republic (Facilitator: Cemil Aydin) Begins at 11:00 AM Carole Woodall Erdag Göknar Kent Schull Amy Mills Panel 3: Censorship and Political Satire (Sarah Shields) Begins at 2:30 PM Palmira Brummett Adam Mestyan Melike E. Boylan Yasemin Gencer

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Film Screening: "Fire at Sea / Fuocoammare" (2016)

Thursday, November 2, 7:00 PM
Smith Warehouse - Bay 4, C105 - Ahmadieh Family Lecture Hall
Join the Rubenstein Library's Human Rights Archive and the Duke Human Rights Center @FHI for a special film screening, photo exhibition, and post-film discussion. The first documentary to ever win the top award at the Berlin International Film Festival, "Fire at Sea" takes place in Lampedusa, a once peaceful Mediterranean island that has become a major entry point for African refugees into Europe. There, we meet Samuele, a 12-year-old boy who lives simply, climbing rocks by the shore and playing with his slingshot. Yet nearby we also witness thousands of men, women, and children trying to survive the crossing from Africa in boats that are too small for such a journey. Filmmaker Gianfranco Rose masterfully places these realities side by side, and in so doing creates a remarkable third narrative that jolts us into a new understanding of what is really happening in the Mediterranean today. The screening will be accompanied by an exhibit of works by photographer Darrin Zammit Lupi, who will participate in a post-screening discussion. Free and open to the public.

more information »

Rights! Camera! Action! Film Screening: 'Fire at Sea / Fuocoammare' (2016)

Thursday, November 2, 7:00 PM
Other (see event description)
East Campus

Join the Duke University Libraries Department of International and Area Studies, Rubenstein Library's Human Rights Archive, and the Duke Human Rights Center @FHI for a special film screening, photo exhibition, and post-film discussion.

The first documentary to ever win the top award at the Berlin International Film Festival, Fire at Sea takes place in Lampedusa, a once peaceful Mediterranean island that has become a major entry point for African refugees into Europe. There, we meet Samuele, a 12-year-old boy who lives simply, climbing rocks by the shore and playing with his slingshot. Yet nearby we also witness thousands of men, women, and children trying to survive the crossing from Africa in boats that are too small for such a journey. Filmmaker Gianfranco Rose masterfully places these realities side by side, and in so doing creates a remarkable third narrative that jolts us into a new understanding of what is really happening in the Mediterranean today.

The screening will be accompanied by an exhibit of works by photographer Darrin Zammit Lupi, who will participate in a post-screening discussion.

Free and open to the public.

Co-sponsored by the Department of International and Area Studies, Human Rights Archive, Forum for Scholars and Publics, Duke Human Rights Center @ FHI, and the Kenan Institute for Ethics Refugee Project.

Location: Ahmadieh Family Lecture Hall, Bay 4, Smith Warehouse

More about Fire at Sea:

"‘Fire at Sea’ Is Not the Documentary You’d Expect About the Migrant Crisis. It’s Better." (New York Times)

For more information, contact:

Holly Ackerman, Librarian for Latin American, Iberian and Latino/a Studies

Patrick Stawski, Human Rights Archivist


more information »

VFF: Mapping the History of the Bull City

Friday, November 3, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
In this presentation, we'll share on-going work to map 150 years of housing history in Durham for a large public history exhibit. We're developing a range of innovative approaches to historical maps, including 3D-printed maps of areas destroyed by urban renewal, using city directories to reconstruct the daily lives of oral history interviewees, and reconstructing detailed demographics using the long-form census releases. The presentation will include sharing these techniques, some practical lessons learned as well as telling some of the Bull City's story.

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[Munch & Mull Digital Scholarship discussion group]

Monday, November 6, 12:00 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

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Research Collaboration Strategies and Tools

Tuesday, November 7, 1:00 PM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

Scholars increasingly work on collaborative research projects. Collaborative projects often bring together partners across disciplines, institutions, and sectors. These projects present opportunities for innovation but also raise challenges for the development of efficient and effective workflows and the management of data. This workshop will examine considerations for collaborative research and present some strategies for developing and documenting workflows as well as methods for storing and sharing data. We will also look at some tools (i.e., Box, OSF, PRDN, etc.) available at Duke that can be used to support these types of projects.

more information »

Open Studio

Tuesday, November 7, 1:00 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Drop-in consultations and team work time for digital projects. To reserve a specific appointment time with a Digital Scholarship Services staff member, contact askdigital@duke.edu.

more information »

Problems in Digital Publishing: Defining and Managing Workflows [Digital Publishing Workshop]

Thursday, November 9, 10:30 AM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Managing a digital publishing project can be overwhelming; digital tools, while helpful, aren’t necessarily going to help if it’s not clear what the challenge is. Managing content, managing people, and managing timelines are all assisted by clear workflows, appropriate tools, and documentation. We’ll look at different needs and tools for coordinating digital publishing workflows, with specific attention to cross-platform integration (Google Drive, Box, etc) and the ease of adapting their affordances to common parts of the digital scholarship lifecycle.

more information »

Tidy Data Visualization with Python

Thursday, November 9, 1:00 PM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

Python can be a great option for exploration, analysis and visualization of tabular data, like spreadsheets and CSV files, if you know which tools to use and how to get started. This workshop will take you through some practical examples of using Python and the Pandas module inside a Jupyter notebook, to load data, transform it into a standard “tidy” format, and visualize it with Seaborn (or another similar module). There are no prerequisites for this workshop – familiarity with the Python programming language is not required, but you will probably find it easier to follow if you have a little coding experience since we will not be giving an overview of the language itself. Instead, the focus will be on learning how to use the language through conceptual understanding and recipes for specific, commonly-useful tasks.

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VFF: The Cell Cycle Browser: an interactive tool for visualizing, simulating, and perturbing cell cycle progression

Friday, November 10, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend. Please click on "More Event Information" below for the most up-to-date schedule and details.

more information »

[Munch & Mull Digital Scholarship discussion group]

Monday, November 13, 12:00 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

more information »

Open Studio

Tuesday, November 14, 1:00 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Drop-in consultations and team work time for digital projects. To reserve a specific appointment time with a Digital Scholarship Services staff member, contact askdigital@duke.edu.

more information »

Problems in Digital Publishing: Metadata, Discovery, Linked Open Data [Digital Publishing Workshop]

Thursday, November 16, 10:30 AM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

This workshop will help participants understand how to make digital resources easier to discover, reuse, and query. Beginning with an overview of [linked] open data (semantic web, RDF), we'll study examples of how digital publishing/scholarship projects have made their data open for creative remixing and open research.

more information »

SSRI~ Workshop: Introduction to SAS Session 2: Data Analysis

Thursday, November 16, 2:00 PM
SSRI-Gross Hall 230E
West Campus
This workshop offers an overview of the SAS programming language, focusing on data management activities. Session 1 includes a general overview of major SAS components (Program Editor, Log and Output) and the core concepts of SAS programming (DATA and PROC steps). It focuses on the process of importing and modifying data, including issues of importing/exporting data from other file formats, merging and concatenating data sets, and adding to or subsettting from datasets. Key SAS statements described include: PROC IMPORT, SET, MERGE, IF-THEN, and WHERE. Session 2 focuses on data analysis, including variable creation/recoding and descriptive analyses typically used in data management. Key SAS statements described include: PROC CONTENTS, PROC MEANS, and PROC FREQ. Together, these two sessions allow researchers to learn basic data management processes using the SAS statistical system. Registration required; please click the "more event information" button below to access the registration form.

more information »

VFF: Visualization Friday Forum

Friday, November 17, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend. Please click on "More Event Information" below for the most up-to-date schedule and details.

more information »

[Munch & Mull Digital Scholarship discussion group]

Monday, November 20, 12:00 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

more information »

Open Studio

Tuesday, November 21, 1:00 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Drop-in consultations and team work time for digital projects. To reserve a specific appointment time with a Digital Scholarship Services staff member, contact askdigital@duke.edu.

more information »

[Munch & Mull Digital Scholarship discussion group]

Monday, November 27, 12:00 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

more information »

Open Studio

Tuesday, November 28, 1:00 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Drop-in consultations and team work time for digital projects. To reserve a specific appointment time with a Digital Scholarship Services staff member, contact askdigital@duke.edu.

more information »

How To Make It Last [Digital Publishing Workshop]

Thursday, November 30, 10:30 AM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

In surveying a few long-lasting digital publishing projects, we'll learn what characteristics have made them credible, sustainable, and fundable. What decisions shaped the projects and helped ensure their longevity? What kinds of institutional and grant support have fostered their continued growth? What technological factors have been important in their durability? Possible projects include the Brown Women Writer's Project, William Blake Archive, Rossetti Archive, Walt Whitman Archive, and the Index Thomisticus.

more information »

VFF: Visualization Friday Forum

Friday, December 1, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend. Please click on "More Event Information" below for the most up-to-date schedule and details.

more information »

[Munch & Mull Digital Scholarship discussion group]

Monday, December 4, 12:00 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

more information »

VFF: New Psychasthenia Game (tentative title)

Friday, December 8, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend. Please click on "More Event Information" below for the most up-to-date schedule and details.

more information »

[Munch & Mull Digital Scholarship discussion group]

Monday, December 11, 12:00 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

more information »

Integrating Research and Teaching

Friday, January 19, 12:00 PM
Rubenstein Library 153 (Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room)
West Campus
How do research faculty make the turn to studying their teaching?
Join a discussion with Professor Leslie Schiff and Professor Julie Reynolds about their National Science Foundation-funded research into teaching in STEM disciplines. Drs. Schiff and Reynolds will discuss their collaboration on the grant, how their own research has informed their teaching, and why they study teaching and learning in their fields.
Participants will
  • learn strategies to integrate their research and teaching roles;
  • understand motivations for engaging in scholarship about teaching;
  • identify possible pathways for their own work as teacher/scholars and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL).
Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to vanessa.turnier@duke.edu.
Leslie Schiff is a Professor of Microbiology and Immunology and Associate Dean for University Curriculum at the University of Minnesota.
Julie Reynolds is an Associate Professor of the Practice in Biology at Duke University. She leads the $3 million NSF funded project Collaborative Research: Accelerating the pace of research and implementation of Writing-to-Learn pedagogies across STEM disciplines.
This discussion is part of the Duke Faculty Write Program's conversation series "Writing Lives/Teaching Lives: How faculty integrate scholarship and teaching." Co-sponsors include the Center for Instructional Technology and the Language, Arts, and Media Program.

more information »

Introduction to Stata

Wednesday, February 7, 1:00 PM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

Stata for Research focuses on the core concepts of using Stata. This workshop provides a hands on overview of how to load, manage, and analyze data using Stata. The workshop will also include a brief introduction to Stata graphics as well. No previous experience with Stata is required.

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