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Digital Humanities Workshop Series: Text/Data - Introduction

Wednesday, January 17, 9:00 AM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

This series consists of 8 workshops focused on working with textual data. It is geared toward research in the humanities, but some sessions will also be relevant to the social sciences. Moving in a trajectory from close reading (markup, encoding, creating electronic editions) to "distant reading" (topic modeling, machine learning, aggregating and analyzing large corpora), the workshops aim to provide participants with a general knowledge of approaches to working with text.

In this introductory session, participants will gain an overview of both the workshop series and the kinds of research questions that can be explored by certain text analysis methods. Because it is intended only to provide a high-level overview of concepts that will be discussed in greater detail at future workshops, this session will not count toward RCR credit.

more information »

Assessing courses at mid-semester

Wednesday, January 17, 2:30 PM
Rubenstein Library 349 (Breedlove Conference Room)
West Campus

• What practices are most likely to provide helpful information while the course is in progress?
• What options are there for administering mid-term course evaluations?
• Are there other ways of collecting feedback from students, besides formal evaluations?

This session is part of the Trinity College Office of Assessment Spring 2018 workshop series, organized by Jennifer Hill, Ed.D.

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Designing a Writing-Intensive Course

Thursday, January 18, 12:15 PM
Other (see event description)
West Campus

What’s expected in a course coded as W (writing intensive)? How can you meet those expectations in your course? This session explores a variety of approaches to teaching a writing-intensive course—from multiple, smaller writing tasks to semester-long research projects.

Topics include choosing writing assignments that fit the course structure, helping students learn about writing in your discipline, using peer feedback, deciding whether to assign multiple drafts, balancing course content and attention to writing.

Note that this session is oriented toward the humanities and interpretive social sciences.

Presenter: Cary Moskovitz, Director, Writing in the Disciplines, Thompson Writing Program.

Soc/Psych 331 (West Campus)
Lunch provided. Capped at 12 participants.

Please register at: https://duke.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bQxgMEuB0mEfe2F

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VFF: Invisible Visualization: Making data visualizations accessible to the blind and other people with disabilities

Friday, January 19, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
Data visualization helps convey complex information in a simple way, but too often it excludes people with visual disabilities. This talk will cover well-known challenges and pitfalls for accessible information graphics, and describe techniques to overcome them, focusing on Web solutions using SVG, HTML, ARIA, and the Web Audio API. These same techniques can also benefit sighted users of voice services like Siri or Alexa.

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A Conversation with Legendary Book Editor Bob Loomis

Friday, January 19, 12:00 PM
Perkins 217
West Campus

Join the Duke University Libraries for an informal lunchtime conversation with Bob Loomis, the legendary Random House editor and Duke alumnus (T ’49), as he discusses the lively literary culture on campus during his post-war undergraduate years.

Loomis’s fellow students included the award-winning authors William Styron, Guy Davenport, and New York Magazine founder Clay Felker. He was also a student of celebrated Duke English Professor William Blackburn.

Light lunch provided. Please register to help us estimate attendance.

More about Bob Loomis:

For more information, contact:

Sara Seten Berghausen, Associate Curator of Collections, Rubenstein Library


more information »

VFF: Invisible Visualization: Making data visualizations accessible to the blind and other people with disabilities

Friday, January 19, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend.

more information »

A Conversation with Legendary Book Editor Bob Loomis

Friday, January 19, 12:00 PM
Rubenstein Library 249 (Carpenter Conference Room)
West Campus

Join the Duke University Libraries for an informal lunchtime conversation with Bob Loomis, the legendary Random House editor and Duke alumnus (T ’49), as he discusses the lively literary culture on campus during his post-war undergraduate years.

Loomis’s fellow students included the award-winning authors William Styron, Guy Davenport, and New York Magazine founder Clay Felker. He was also a student of celebrated Duke English Professor William Blackburn.

Light lunch provided. Please register to help us estimate attendance.

More about Bob Loomis:

For more information, contact:

Sara Seten Berghausen, Associate Curator of Collections, Rubenstein Library


more information »

Intro to R: Data Transformations, Analysis, and Data Structures

Friday, January 19, 1:00 PM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus
A gentle introduction to the basics of R using RStudio. Learn about managing your R projects, data types, variable assignments, data structures, and packages such as: tidyverse (dplyR) and ggvis. Attendees will have the opportunity of supplementing the materials covered in this workshop with free academic access to the interactive training at DataCamp.com.
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Intro to R: Data Transformations, Analysis, and Data Structures

Friday, January 19, 1:00 PM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

A gentle introduction to the basics of R using RStudio. Learn about managing your R projects, data types, variable assignments, data structures, and packages such as tidyverse (dplyR) and ggvis.

Attendees will be registered for the opportunity of supplementing this workshop with free academic access to the interactive training at DataCamp.com.

The workshop rely on the tidy data approach supported by the tidyverse libraries.

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more information »

Introduction to Text and Data (Text/Data Digital Humanities Workshop Series)

Monday, January 22, 9:00 AM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

This series consists of 8 workshops focused on working with textual data. It is geared toward research in the humanities, but some sessions will also be relevant to the social sciences. Moving in a trajectory from close reading (markup, encoding, creating electronic editions) to "distant reading" (topic modeling, machine learning, aggregating and analyzing large corpora), the workshops aim to provide participants with a general knowledge of approaches to working with text.

In this introductory session, participants will gain an overview of both the workshop series and the kinds of research questions that can be explored by certain text analysis methods. Because it is intended only to provide a high-level overview of concepts that will be discussed in greater detail at future workshops, this session will not count toward RCR credit.

more information »

Intro to QGIS

Monday, January 22, 10:00 AM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

Looking for an open source option for GIS? QGIS is free and it is one alternative to using ArcGIS. In this workshop we will demonstrate how to import and analyze data in QGIS and discuss the benefits of using QGIS over other GIS software. In the process, we'll go over some general GIS concepts such as layers, types of GIS files, and projections.

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Report on the "Digging Deeper" TRLN Text Mining workshop [Munch & Mull Digital Scholarship Discussion Group]

Monday, January 22, 12:00 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

On December 15, 2017, personnel from the Triangle Research Libraries Network (Duke, NC Central, NCSU, and UNC Chapel Hill) attended the Digging Deeper workshop -- an introduction to text-mining approaches, resources, and tools. Duke participants will share their impressions of the workshop -- what worked and didn't, what lessons they'll take into their own work -- and their thoughts on how we might build on this training. Find more information on the Digging Deeper workshops, including curricular materials and upcoming activities at https://teach.htrc.illinois.edu/.

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R Markdown

Tuesday, January 23, 9:00 AM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

R Markdown provides an authoring framework for data science. You can use a single R Markdown file to both save and execute code or generate high quality reports that can be shared with an audience. This hands-on workshop will demonstrate the how to create fully reproducible static and dynamic R Markdown reports in a variety of output formats and will provide tips and tricks for customization.

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Introduction to XML, TEI, and Structured Markup (Digital Humanities Workshop Series: Text/Data)

Wednesday, January 24, 9:00 AM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

This session introduces the concept of semantic markup and distinguishes between markup and automated textual analysis. Using TEI as our platform for learning, we will study approaches to and reasons for marking up documents. Participants will have a chance to work with documents directly and will encounter some of the real-life decisions that TEI editors must make. Sample projects will illustrate the range of research and discovery made possible by TEI-encoded texts.

** This workshop is offered for RCR credit as GS712.13. Participants who plan to receive RCR credit (as indicated on the registration form) will receive priority registration.

more information »

Data Management Fundamentals

Wednesday, January 24, 1:00 PM
Perkins 217
West Campus

This workshop introduces data management practices to consider throughout the research lifecycle: planning, organization, documentation, storage and backup, sharing, citation, and preservation. The workshop will offer an overview of general recommendations that are relevant across disciplines and will point attendees to additional resources at Duke and beyond.

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SSRI~ Workshop: Planning Research and Collecting Data

Wednesday, January 24, 3:00 PM
SSRI-Gross Hall 230E
West Campus
This workshop is designed for researchers who are planning to collect original data and considering how to select one or more methods for doing so. The workshop begins with a review of effective and clear research question formulation and proceeds to a discussion of the advantages and opportunities, as well as limitations of various data collection methods (and associated analytic techniques), including survey research, in-depth interviewing, ethnography, focus groups, and text analysis. In addition, the workshop will attend to logistical and theoretical considerations in implementing each of these research approaches. Registration required; please click the "more event information" button below to access the registration form.

more information »

Shiny

Thursday, January 25, 9:00 AM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

Shiny is an R package that makes it easy to build interactive web apps straight from R. You can host standalone apps on a webpage or embed them in R Markdown documents or build dashboards. This workshop will introduce you to the basics of building web applications with Shiny, essentials of reactive programming, and how to customize and deploy your apps for others to use.

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Mapping with R

Thursday, January 25, 1:00 PM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

R has become a popular and reproducible option for supporting spatial and statistical analysis. This hands-on workshop will demonstrate how to plot x/y coordinates; how to generate thematic chloropleths with US Census and other federal data; import, view and produce shapefiles; and create leaflet maps for viewing on the web.

Prerequisite: Intro to R. All attendees are expected to be basically familiar with R, R Studio, and the Tidyverse. For your convenience you can watch a previous recording of Intro to R and work through the practice datasets on your own.

The workshop rely on the tidy data approach supported by the tidyverse libraries.

more information »

Infographics in PowerPoint

Friday, January 26, 9:00 AM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

The “infographics” style of presenting information and telling visual stories is popular both for internal reporting and for trying to reach and teach the general public. There are many desktop and online tools that can be used to compose static infographics, but we will focus on Microsoft PowerPoint because so many people have free access to it on campus and already have some comfort with it as a visual communications tool. This workshop will give a brief introduction to graphic design and storytelling principles, as well as hands-on practice with using PowerPoint to create icons and other vector shapes to combine with text and visualizations to tell compelling and eye-catching data stories. There are no prerequisites, but some experience using PowerPoint will be helpful.

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VFF: IEEE VIS 2017 contest

Friday, January 26, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend.

more information »

OLE, Folio, and the Next Generation of Library Services [Munch & Mull Digital Scholarship Discussion Group]

Monday, January 29, 12:00 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

The Open Library Environment (OLE, https://www.openlibraryenvironment.org/) is both a community and a system geared towards shared development of libraries' technical infrastructure. Recently, the OLE community has begun development of FOLIO (https://www.folio.org/), an open platform for delivering library services. Ginny Boyer (Director of OLE Strategic Planning) provides an overview of the OLE project and the Folio aspect, and leads discussion of what this project is and what it hopes to achieve short and long term. In 2016 Duke University Libraries received Mellon Foundation funding to support the further development, refinement, and adoption of OLE by a broader group of public and private institutions (more information at http://blogs.library.duke.edu/blog/2016/02/04/mellon-grant-continues-support-of-open-source-library-system/#sthash.Wb0Ml1uj.dpuf).

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Reproducibility: Data Management, Git, and RStudio

Monday, January 29, 1:00 PM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

In response to a growing focus on the importance of reproducibility, replication, and transparency in the research endeavor, scholars are adapting their practices and learning new skills and tools. This workshop will introduce some general data management strategies that can increase the reproducibility of your work. You will also learn through hands-on exercises how to harness two specific tools, git and RStudio, to support the execution of more reproducible research projects. Git is a powerful version control system and RStudio is an open-source statistical software program.

To fully participate in this workshop, please bring your own laptop. The Hands-on part of this workshop focuses on the practical aspects of configuring RStudio with Git. If you don't intend to use the R programming language, you may want to take a different workshop.

Prerequisite: Intro to R. All attendees are expected to be basically familiar with R, R Studio. For your convenience you can watch a previous recording of Intro to R and work through the practice datasets on your own.

more information »

Reproducibility: Data Management, Git, and RStudio

Monday, January 29, 1:00 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

In response to a growing focus on the importance of reproducibility, replication, and transparency in the research endeavor, scholars are adapting their practices and learning new skills and tools. This workshop will introduce some general data management strategies that can increase the reproducibility of your work. You will also learn through hands-on exercises how to harness two specific tools, git and RStudio, to support the execution of more reproducible research projects. Git is a powerful version control system and RStudio is an open-source statistical software program.

To fully participate in this workshop, please bring your own laptop. The Hands-on part of this workshop focuses on the practical aspects of configuring RStudio with Git. If you don't intend to use the R programming language, you may want to take a different workshop.

Prerequisite: Intro to R. All attendees are expected to be basically familiar with R, R Studio. For your convenience you can watch a previous recording of Intro to R and work through the practice datasets on your own.

more information »

Adobe Illustrator for Diagrams

Tuesday, January 30, 9:00 AM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

In this workshop, you will learn the basics of using Adobe Illustrator, the professional standard in vector graphics software for creating diagrams and infographics. Many people avoid using it because of its steep learning curve, but you will see that it is quite easy to combine simple shapes to create interesting and clear diagrams, and to give all your work that professional edge. There are no prerequisites.

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Teaching for Equity: Lessons Learned and Creating Classroom Change

Tuesday, January 30, 12:00 PM
Perkins 217
West Campus
TFEF group photo The Teaching for Equity Fellows program is in its third year and continues to grow. Join us and a panel of faculty members who have participated in the “Teaching for Equity Fellows” Program, who will share what they are learning about teaching for equity, how it is changing their teaching, and how the program might benefit you.
Panelists include:
  • Karen Murphy, Lecturing Fellow in Psychology and Neuroscience and Assistant Dean of Trinity College
  • Francois Lutzoni, Professor of Biology
  • Luciana Fellin, Professor of the Practice of Romance Studies
Lunch will be provided for those who register by noon on Monday January 29, 2018

more information »

Applications of TEI for Research (Digital Humanities Workshop Series: Text/Data)

Wednesday, January 31, 9:00 AM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Building on the content of the previous workshop, this session takes an in-depth look at the use of TEI as a research tool. We'll look in detail at sample projects and explore common technologies for searching and disseminating TEI (XSLT, Xquery). Participants will get hands-on experience generating various outputs from TEI source (PDFs, HTML, RTF, TeX, KML for geographic data) and will learn how XQuery/XPath allow structured searching and cross-referencing in complex texts such as critical editions and diplomatic transcriptions.

** This workshop is offered for RCR credit as GS712.14. Participants who plan to receive RCR credit (as indicated on the registration form) will receive priority registration.

more information »

Story Maps with ArcGIS Online

Wednesday, January 31, 1:00 PM
Perkins 218
West Campus

ArcGIS Online is a companion to the ArcGIS client that allows members of a group to store and share spatial data online and to perform GIS analysis in a browser environment. It can be used independently or in conjunction with an ArcGIS client. We'll focus on its Story Maps, which provide a way to disseminate a finished product in an interactive web interface. The audience doesn't need to know or have access to any ArcGIS products. Story Maps allow the integration of other media (photos, text, videos) and allow following changes over space and time.

Attendees will need to bring a laptop computer.

more information »

SSRI~ Workshop: Qualitative Data Collection & Management

Wednesday, January 31, 3:00 PM
SSRI-Gross Hall 230E
West Campus
Qualitative Data Collection & Management-This workshop provides an introduction to a range of qualitative research methods as well as an overview of the strengths and weaknesses of each approach. Qualitative research methods, including in-depth interviews, focus groups, archival analysis, and participant observation, vary considerably in the resources and time required to execute them reliably, and in the types of data they generate. Which data collection techniques are appropriate to which kinds of research questions and projects, and how do you execute these methods well? How are issues of reliability and validity considered and weighed in qualitative research? We will also explore different ways of managing your data prior to commencing data collection in order to facilitate the transition to data analysis. Some time will be given to the role of NVivo software in facilitating data management and preparing for data analysis. Registration required; please click "more information" to access the registration form.

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Visualization in R using ggplot2

Thursday, February 1, 9:30 AM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

Data science skills are increasingly important for research and industry projects. With complex data science projects, however, come complex needs for understanding and communicating analysis processes and results. Ultimately, an analyst's data science toolbox is incomplete without visualization skills. Incorporating effective visualizations directly into the analysis tool you are using can facilitate quick data exploration, streamline your research process, and improve the reproducibility of your research.

In this workshop we will focus on ggplot2, a library for R that creates clear and well-designed visualizations and that plays well with other tidyverse packages. While prior experience with ggplot2 and with other tidyverse packages is not required, some basic familiarity with R is expected. Please consider attending (or viewing a recording of) our Introduction to R workshop before attending this workshop on ggplot2.

In this workshop, we will use RStudio and RMarkdown files for all exercises. You may use the in-room computers, but if you prefer to bring your own laptop, but please make sure you come with RStudio and the tidyverse package installed. You may also want to install the knitr package to be able to compile the entire Rmarkdown file.

Please note: this classroom has a limited number of seats. If you choose to register for the workshop, please make every effort to attend, or if you cannot, please cancel your registration as soon as a conflict comes up. If all spots fill up, we will maintain a waitlist in the event of cancelations. In addition, a previous version of this workshop has been recorded, and the associated files are available on GitHub. If you can't attend but would like to be notified when materials are available, please contact Angela Zoss.

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more information »

VFF: Defining Models

Friday, February 2, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
From economic pie charts, algorithms and supermodels to architectural prototypes and climate-change models, models are ubiquitous and increasingly powerful. Visualization is modeling by a different name. In order to better understand the strengths and weakness of models-both our own and others'-I offer a short definition that is applicable to them all. This definition depends heavily of assessments of models made by scientists, social scientists and philosophers of science. But it also posits attributes to all model-types that those folks have found controversial.

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[Munch & Mull Digital Scholarship Discussion Group]

Monday, February 5, 12:00 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

more information »

Intro to ArcGIS Pro

Monday, February 5, 1:00 PM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

ArcGIS Pro is a newly designed interface to the tried-and-true ArcGIS desktop software. It has essentially the same functions, but with more of a MS-Office interface. As a native 64-bit program, it also has superior performance. There are a few nice feature enhancements such as multiple layouts in a single project. It's more fully integrated with ArcGIS Online, and users will need to have created an Duke ArcGIS Online account. An administrator will activate your ArcGIS Pro license after you've created an ArcGIS Online account.

ArcGIS Pro can help you analyze or visualize digital data that has a locational component, as well as discuss starting points for obtaining data. Examples will focus on social science data, but attendees are encouraged to ask questions regarding their own needs and will be welcome to make one-on-one appointments later for more focused instruction. It's helpful, but not necessary, to be familiar with ArcGIS Desktop beforehand.

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Crafting Effective Writing Assignments II: The Writing Process

Monday, February 5, 4:00 PM
Perkins 218
West Campus

Left to their own devices, students will often wait until a writing assignment is nearly due—cheating themselves out of much the learning the assignment was designed to support. This session explores a range of options for staging the writing process in ways that can maximize learning, without overburdening the instructor.

Note that this session is oriented toward the humanities and interpretive social sciences.

Presenter: Cary Moskovitz, Director, Writing in the Disciplines, Thompson Writing Program.


Capped at 12 participants.
Please register at: https://duke.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_8jGmtJI1dnGy1G5

more information »

3rd Annual African Film Festival: Akounak Tedalat Taha Tazoughai

Tuesday, February 6, 7:00 PM
Rubenstein Library Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room 153
Please join us for the first night of the African Film Festival! The first ever Tuareg language fictional film, based on the legendary rock-u-drama "Purple Rain," Akounak or "Rain the Color Blue with a Little Red in it" explores the world of a musician trying to succeed in the raucous subculture of the Niger guitar scene. The protagonist, real life musician Mdou Moctar, must battle fierce competition from jealous musicians, overcome family conflicts, endure the trials of love, and overcome his biggest rival - himself. Carried by stunning musical performances from Mdou, the film is a window into modern day Tuareg guitar and an experiment in participatory ethnographic filmmaking.

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Acquiring and Preparing a Corpus of Texts (Digital Humanities Workshop Series: Text/Data)

Wednesday, February 7, 9:00 AM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

This session focuses on the technical dimensions of corpus development. Using an array of printed matter -- from digital facsimiles of incunabula to modern letterpress/offset books -- we will explore the risks and benefits of optical character recognition (OCR); file formatting and naming issues; organization strategies for large corpora; and problems of data cleaning and preparation. We will also look at some common sources for textual research data, such as Project Gutenberg, the Internet Archive, and Google Books. We will also discuss some common legal concerns around the use of textual corpora.

** This workshop is offered for RCR credit as GS712.15. Participants who plan to receive RCR credit (as indicated on the registration form) will receive priority registration.

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SSRI~ Workshop: Designing Survey Questionnaires and Survey Experiments

Wednesday, February 7, 3:00 PM
SSRI-Gross Hall 230E
West Campus
This workshop examines question wording and questionnaire design for online and paper questionnaires. This course does not include programming (which is offered in the separate Qualtrics workshop), but focuses on the conceptual issues and considerations underpinning questionnaire design, question wording, and response options. This workshop also provides an introduction to conducting survey experiments, including a brief motivation for when and why to use an experiment, common experimental designs, constructing experimental manipulations, and analysis. Registration required; please click "more information" to access the registration form.

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Weaver Memorial Lecture: An Evening with Colson Whitehead, author of 'The Underground Railroad'

Wednesday, February 7, 6:00 PM
Other (see event description)
West Campus

Colson Whitehead Calendar GraphicEvent Location: Page Auditorium, Duke West Campus‚Äč (See venue info and directions)

Colson Whitehead is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Underground Railroad, winner of the 2016 National Book Award and 2017 Pulitzer Prize. His other books include The Noble Hustle, Sag Harbor, The Intuitionist, and The Colossus of New York, among others.

Whitehead is the 2017-2018 Weaver Memorial Lecturer, a speaker series hosted every other year by the Duke University Libraries in memory of William B. Weaver, a 1972 Duke graduate and former member of the Library Advisory Board.

The event is free and open to the public, but tickets are required. Reserve your seat through the Duke University Box Office.

Co-sponsored by the Office of the President, Office of the Provost, and Department of English.

More about Colson Whitehead:

Colson Whitehead's website

"Colson Whitehead on Slavery, Success and Writing the Novel That Really Scared Him" (New York Times)

VIDEO: How writing about race in the past evokes the present (Signature Views)

For more information, contact:

Aaron Welborn, Director of Communications


more information »

The Hidden Work of Digital Scholarship

Thursday, February 8, 11:45 AM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

This year's graduate-student panel presents the range of skills, experiences, and roles necessary for creating and sustaining digital scholarly projects.

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Custom Interactive Diagrams in LucidChart

Friday, February 9, 9:00 AM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

Diagrams, a type of visualization that focuses on shapes and connectors, can be used to visualize a structure, process, or concept. Diagrams can be created in any standard graphic design or drawing programs, but there are only a few general diagramming tools that are specially designed to assist with spacial arrangement and shape choice, and many of those tools focus on creating static, print-based diagrams. LucidChart, available to members of the Duke community, can create engaging diagrams with interactive components that can be shared and embedded online.

In this workshop, we will learn the basics of creating interactive diagrams in LucidChart. We will learn to layout elements on the canvas, import multimedia objects, add layers and hotspots, and share or embed in Sites@Duke. This is a hands-on workshop, and you can either use the in-room computers or bring your own laptop. Please follow these instructions on Software@Duke to create your LucidChart account prior to the start of the workshop.

Please note: this classroom has a limited number of seats. If you choose to register for the workshop, please make every effort to attend, or if you cannot, please cancel your registration as soon as a conflict comes up. If all spots fill up, we will maintain a waitlist in the event of cancelations. If you can't attend but would like to be notified when materials are available, please contact Angela Zoss.

more information »

VFF: Academic posters deconstructed

Friday, February 9, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend.

more information »

Creating Effective Video for Teaching and Learning

Monday, February 12, 9:30 AM
Bostock 024
West Campus

Are you interested in integrating video modules into your teaching to enhance learning? This faculty workshop will teach the processes to plan and create effective video-based learning modules aligned with your teaching goals. Topics covered include: designing learning experiences using best practices, knowing your audience, methods available to create video, video styles, effective visual design, integrating assessments, planning for the implementation and distribution of your video module, and considerations for the learning experience. Participants will create a short demonstration video to experience the process of video creation.

Presenters: Sophia Stone, Duke Learning Innovation & Mich Donovan and Brandon Johnson, Office of Information Technology

Priority is given to Duke undergraduate faculty, with secondary priority to academic staff who work directly with faculty to create learning materials for undergraduate students. Others may register as space allows.

Light breakfast, coffee and lunch will be provided to those who register by 2/6/2018.

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3rd Annual African Film Festival: Children of the Mountain

Tuesday, February 13, 7:00 PM
Rubenstein Library Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room 153
Please join us for the second night of the African Film Festival! After an affair with a neighbor's spouse, Essuman, gives birth to Nuku, a baby boy born with a cleft lip, cerebral palsy and Down's syndrome. Led to believe she's the owner of a "dirty womb" from Ghanian old wives' tales, her future as a wife is shattered as her lover, Ejah rejects the child and the community eyes her with suspicion. As Essuman searches for a cure to her son's illnesses, she encounters futility at hospitals and dubious religious leaders and medicine men, all while oscillating between devotion to her son and her desperate attempts at self-preservation. Will she give in to the pressures of Ghanian society and abandon her child in favor of a clean slate? Or will she seek a more hopeful future in the rural mountains of Ghana-where the souls of children are said to wait?

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Ngrams, Concordances, Style Analysis (Digital Humanities Workshop Series: Text/Data)

Wednesday, February 14, 9:00 AM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

This session focuses on the kinds of textual analysis that are possible using concordances, document-term matrices, measures of distinctiveness and similarity, and other tools of style or content analysis based on the characteristics of tokens (words) within documents relative to general characteristics of a corpus. We will study several examples of how these techniques have been used in research.

** This workshop is offered for RCR credit as GS712.16. Participants who plan to receive RCR credit (as indicated on the registration form) will receive priority registration.

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Introduction to the Open Science Framework

Wednesday, February 14, 10:00 AM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

The Open Science Framework (OSF) is a free, open source project management tool developed and maintained by the Center for Open Science. The OSF can help scholars manage their workflow, organize their materials, and share all or part of a project with the broader research community. This workshop will demonstrate some of the key functionalities of the tool including how to structure your materials, manage permissions, version content, integrate with third-party tools (such as Box, GitHub, or Mendeley), share materials, register projects, and track usage.

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Story Maps with ArcGIS Online

Wednesday, February 14, 1:00 PM
Perkins 218
West Campus

ArcGIS Online is a companion to the ArcGIS client that allows members of a group to store and share spatial data online and to perform GIS analysis in a browser environment. It can be used independently or in conjunction with an ArcGIS client. We'll focus on its Story Maps, which provide a way to disseminate a finished product in an interactive web interface. The audience doesn't need to know or have access to any ArcGIS products. Story Maps allow the integration of other media (photos, text, videos) and allow following changes over space and time.

Attendees will need to bring a laptop computer.

more information »

SSRI~ Workshop: Qualitative Data Analysis

Wednesday, February 14, 3:00 PM
SSRI-Gross Hall 230E
West Campus
This workshop will allow students to transform interview transcripts into analyzable data, and to learn foundational skills in qualitative data analysis, including a brief introduction to using NVivo software. Participants will be introduced to the most common coding strategies deployed in social science to analyze data collected through in-depth interviews, focus groups, participant observation, and/or archival analyses of text. A section of the workshop will be dedicated to taking questions regarding coding in the individual research projects of participants. Registration required; please click "more information" to access the registration form.

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Visualization Friday Forum

Friday, February 16, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend.

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Digging Deeper at UNC Libraries with Amanda Henley and Nathan Kelber [Munch & Mull Digital Scholarship Discussion Group]

Monday, February 19, 12:00 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Over the past year several academic libraries have hosted Digging Deeper workshops, to help librarians better explain, train, and support text mining at their institutions. Amanda Henley (Head of Digital Research Services) has been leading those workshops in addition to supporting text analysis and other digital scholarship work at UNC Chapel Hill Libraries. She joins the Munch & Mull discussion, along with new colleague Nathan Kelber, to discuss how UNC librarians are engaging with new forms of textual analysis and ways that librarians can build on and extend the Digging Deeper curriculum (http://teach.htrc.illinois.edu/teaching-resources/).

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Map Design

Monday, February 19, 1:30 PM
Perkins 218
West Campus

Making maps is a creative rather than a purely technical process. Even if you can expertly use the latest and most advanced tools, you still have to make design decisions based on your specific audience, data, and goals. This workshop will present an overview of concepts in cartography and provide practical techniques for creating effective, visually appealing maps. We will explore design principles by analyzing plenty of examples. No specific software experience or GIS knowledge is required.

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3rd Annual African Film Festival: Red Leaves

Tuesday, February 20, 7:00 PM
Rubenstein Library Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room 153
Please join us for the third night of the African Film Festival! "Red Leaves" examines the life of a man Meseganio Tadela (Debebe Eshetu), a 74-year-old recent widower and Ethiopian immigrant. Following the death of his wife, Meseganio sells his apartment and plans on living the rest of his days alternately living with the families of his sons. However, once put into practice, he discovers that his hard-lined traditional values are challenged by family members.

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Analyzing Text with Python - 1/2 (Digital Humanities Workshop Series: Text/Data)

Wednesday, February 21, 9:00 AM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Python is a programming language that is well-suited to working with textual data: it has a clear syntax, it's easy to learn, and there are many libraries available for processing text. We'll use some of its capabilities in this workshop as we discover how to code our own tools for analyzing individual texts and textual corpora. Note: This workshop does not assume any previous experience with Python, and it will include a brief but gentle introduction to the language itself. Like other workshops in the series, its goal is to match research questions with methods rather than to labor technical details.

** This workshop is offered for RCR credit as GS712.17. Participants who plan to receive RCR credit (as indicated on the registration form) will receive priority registration.

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Getting Started with NVivo 11 for Windows

Wednesday, February 21, 3:00 PM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

This workshop will introduce researchers to the basics of NVivo 11 Pro for Windows, a qualitative data analysis software. Participants will learn the foundations needed to begin analyzing data in NVivo. Topics will include how to import data, create nodes and code, and run basic queries. Although Mac users are welcome to attend, this workshop will primarily focus on using NVivo in the Windows environment, though we will discuss some of the differences between the two versions of the software.

Participants will need to bring their own laptops and download NVivo 11 Pro from OIT prior to the session: https://software.duke.edu/node/149 .

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SSRI~ Workshop: Introduction to Qualtrics Survey Software

Wednesday, February 21, 3:00 PM
SSRI-Gross Hall 230E
West Campus
This workshop offers an introduction to Qualtrics survey software, a package available (at no cost to researchers) for use across Duke's campus and medical center. This powerful, easy-to-use system is a great way to collect information online, whether as part of a research protocol or for administrative purposes such as program evaluation. This workshop will introduce participants to the Qualtrics system, demonstrate how to set up an account, create a questionnaire and access its results. It will also cover some basic tools that can be used to customize the questionnaire to fit your needs, such as using display and skip logic to collect more detailed information from a subset of your audience. The workshop is taught through the Duke Initiative on Survey Methodology (DISM) in collaboration with the Duke Office of Information Technology (OIT). Participants will receive a very brief overview of the consulting and other services DISM offers to help Duke researchers develop and conduct surveys. Registration required; please click "more information" to access the registration form.

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Helping Students Write Well-Structured Papers

Thursday, February 22, 12:15 PM
Other (see event description)
West Campus

Many of our student writers struggle to organize their ideas and express them in a coherently structured way. Participants in this workshop will learn (and practice) approaches to helping students review and revise their writing to improve organization and make it easier for readers to see the logical relationships between the parts of their papers.

Presenter: Cary Moskovitz, Director, Writing in the Disciplines, Thompson Writing Program

Soc/Psych 331
Lunch provided. Capped at 12 participants.
Please register at: https://duke.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0dOu9KgYHOOL0TH

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VFF: Multi-spectral Imaging in the Duke Libraries

Friday, February 23, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend.

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OSF + TIER Protocol: Designing a reproducible workflow

Monday, February 26, 1:00 PM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

The Open Science Framework is a free online system for managing and sharing research materials throughout the research cycle, and the TIER Protocol is a workflow for maintaining well-organized documentation of your data and analyses. This workshop will introduce you to key features of the OSF and demonstrate how it can be used in conjunction with TIER to facilitate reproducible research practices, collaboration, and best practices in data management.

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3rd Annual African Film Festival: As I Open My Eyes

Tuesday, February 27, 7:00 PM
Rubenstein Library Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room 153
Please join us for the final night of the African Film Festival! This music-filled, French-Tunisian production is set in Tunis, summer 2010, a few months before the Revolution, and depicts the clash between culture and family as seen through the eyes of a young Tunisian woman balancing the traditional expectations of her family with her creative life, as the singer in a politically charged rock band. Director Leyla Bouzid's feature offers a nuanced portrait of the implications of the Arab Spring on the lives of young people in the region, while also creating a complex story about a young woman using art to transform her reality. To view the trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1hWLpPvTOI

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Analyzing Text with Python - 2/2 (Digital Humanities Workshop Series: Text/Data)

Wednesday, February 28, 9:00 AM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Continuing where the previous workshop left off, this session is focused on the Python Natural Language Toolkit (NLTK). Using the TextBlob library, a user-friendly wrapper for NLTK, we'll examine how Python allows simple yet powerful exploration of corpora beyond word frequency and ngrams.

** This workshop is offered for RCR credit as GS712.18. Participants who plan to receive RCR credit (as indicated on the registration form) will receive priority registration.

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SSRI~ Workshop: Effective Survey Design for Online, Paper, and Mixed-Mode Questionnaires

Wednesday, February 28, 3:00 PM
SSRI-Gross Hall 230E
West Campus
This workshop examines questionnaire design for online and paper questionnaires, such as screen layout and appearance, the use of images, and other aspects of the user interface which affect the accuracy of survey results. This course does not include programming, but focuses on the conceptual issues and considerations underpinning questionnaire design for online and paper designs. It also considers the design issues involved in combing such modes can be combined with other data collection modes, i.e., in-person or telephone. Registration required; please click "More Information" below to access the registration form.

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Teaching as Public Scholarship

Thursday, March 1, 1:30 PM
Other (see event description)
West Campus

How can faculty take their ideas about teaching into public domains? What are our responsibilities and opportunities for doing so? Join a discussion with Inside Higher Ed writer John Warner. Participants will identify strategies for writing about their own teaching, generate possible topics, and learn how to select publication outlets for their work.

This session is part of the Writing Lives/Teaching Lives series co-sponsored by Learning Innovation and the Language, Arts and Media Program (LAMP), and is part of the Forum for Scholars and Publics. No registration is required.

Location: 011 Old Chem

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VFF: Academic posters deconstructed

Friday, March 2, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend. Note: this talk was originally scheduled for February 9, but it has been moved to March 2.

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Visualization Friday Forum

Friday, March 2, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend.

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Designing Effective Academic Posters

Tuesday, March 6, 9:00 AM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

Presenting research in an accurate and visually appealing way can have a huge impact on the communication of research to a broader audience. Academic posters are some of the most visual outputs of a research project, and becoming familiar with good strategies for poster design allows researchers to take full advantage of the opportunity to network with colleagues and promote their own research. This workshop will cover basic considerations for designing effective academic posters, including use of color, layout, fonts/typography, and software choices. Hands-on activities throughout the workshop will also help participants gain comfort with how to apply general principles to the design of a real poster. This workshop will focus on PowerPoint for poster creation, but many of the techniques will apply to more powerful programs like Adobe Illustrator.

Please note: this classroom has a limited number of seats. If you choose to register for the workshop, please make every effort to attend, or if you cannot, please cancel your registration as soon as a conflict comes up. If all spots fill up, we will maintain a waitlist in the event of cancelations. If you can't attend but would like to be notified when materials are available, please contact Angela Zoss.

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SSRI~ Workshop: Research Data Management for the Social Sciences

Tuesday, March 6, 3:00 PM
SSRI-Gross Hall 230E
West Campus
This workshop introduces data management practices to consider throughout the research lifecycle: planning, organization, documentation, storage and backup, sharing, citation, and preservation. The workshop will focus on best practices for data management in the social sciences, with an emphasis on documentation strategies for data collection, file organization, data validation, and analysis protocols. Registration required; please click "more information" to access the registration form.

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Topic Modeling and Document Classification with MALLET (Digital Humanities Workshop Series: Text/Data)

Wednesday, March 7, 9:00 AM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Participants in this session will acquire a general understanding of topic modeling, the automated analysis technique often referred to as "text mining." Topic modeling can refer to a number of different algorithms, which are computationally intensive and mathematically complex. To facilitate a hands-on approach with a focus on process, this workshop uses the open-source MALLET toolkit as a platform for exploring topic modeling with LDA (Latent Dirichlet Allocation) and will not offer a comparison of algorithms. In addition to topic modeling, this session introduces the concepts of sequence labeling and automated document classification, both of which are also possible with MALLET.

** This workshop is offered for RCR credit as GS712.19. Participants who plan to receive RCR credit (as indicated on the registration form) will receive priority registration.

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Developing a Good Informed Consent Process

Wednesday, March 7, 2:00 PM
Perkins 217
West Campus

In this forum you will learn how to develop fully comprehensible, participant-friendly consent protocols. With numerous research funders and journal publishers requiring data management and sharing plans, consent forms and protocols need to address how participant privacy will be protected throughout a project’s lifecycle and how and what data will be shared. The workshop includes interactive exercises where you will assess consent form language to ensure that it is appropriate for the target study population and addresses data sharing in a responsible way.

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Audio Feedback for Student Writing

Wednesday, March 7, 3:00 PM
Perkins 218
West Campus

While teachers have traditionally given students feedback on their writing, advances in digital technology have made oral feedback a viable option. Giving oral feedback can be more pleasant and efficient than written feedback, and students generally respond positively to the intimacy of their instructor’s spoken voice and the greater nuance of spoken comments. Topics will include benefits and drawbacks of recorded oral feedback, types of oral feedback, and some options for recording and disseminating recorded responses.

Presenter: Cary Moskovitz, Director, Writing in the Disciplines, Thompson Writing Program

Capped at 12 participants.
Please register at: https://duke.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_07EHS7ITQleXUAB

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SSRI~ Workshop: Using Excel to organize and analyze information and data and to present findings

Wednesday, March 7, 3:00 PM
SSRI-Gross Hall 230E
West Campus
This workshop provides an overview of ways Excel can be used to structure and even analyze data and to create presentations. It starts with examining basic tools and functions in Excel (including ways that Excel can be used to manage textual data, to combine or divide data cells and sources, and to perform calculations such as sum, average, minimum, and maximum). It then proceeds to an overview of how to sort and transpose data and create graphs and tables. Finally, it reviews how to perform basic statistical operations, including counts, frequencies, and even simple linear regressions, in Excel. Registration required; please click "more information" to access the registration form.

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VFF: Creating text networks in R with textnets

Friday, March 9, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend.

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Discussions of critical thinking

Monday, March 19, 2:00 PM
Rubenstein Library 349 (Breedlove Conference Room)
West Campus

• Can we make the notion of “critical thinking” more concrete? What does it look like?
• How do we represent critical thinking in the curriculum and co-curriculum?
• How does the Office of Assessment operationalize and measure critical thinking?

This session is part of the Trinity College Office of Assessment Spring 2018 workshop series, organized by Jennifer Hill, Ed.D.

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Symposium: Digital Humanities, Collaboration, and Creating New Knowledge

Friday, March 23, 10:00 AM
None
Audience: Scholars and students of Africana Studies, History, Political Science, Media Studies and Public Policy; public historians, documentarians, digital humanists, librarians, and archivists, Purpose: To share and discuss a model for collaboration among activists, library staff, and scholars in which those who made the history are central to constructing and disseminating new knowledge about it. To share new practices within digital humanities, "critical oral histories," and archival creation. To spark conversations with other practitioners about how to engage in this kind of respectful, collaborative digital humanities work Structure: A series of roundtable discussions with partners of the SNCC Digital Gateway project followed by smaller breakout sessions where symposium participants and project partners further discuss aspects of, challenges, and possibilities for collaborative, digital humanities work. NOTE: Later on March 23, there will be a Reception for "Archiving Activism," an exhibit featuring SNCC collections in the Franklin Research Center, Rubenstein Library, 7:00 p.m. The reception will recognize SNCC veterans who have donated portions of their papers to the John Hope Franklin Research Center before and during the SNCC Digital Gateway project. Project partners, Duke and NCCU partners, and community members will be invited to celebrate the project's success in moving of movement paper

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VFF: Network Visualization Literacy

Friday, March 23, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend.

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SNCC Digital Gateway Project Symposium: Learn from the Past, Organize for the Future

Saturday, March 24, 10:00 AM
None
Audience: Activists, community members, scholars, students, teachers, nonprofits (such asNorth Carolina Justice Center and Democracy NC), and others engaged in civic engagement and/or racial equity work Purpose: To explore how SNCC's organizing-its tactics, strategies, experiences, and ideas-can inform today's struggles for democracy, justice, and racial equity and to spark intergenerational conversations among activists, engaged citizens, teachers, and students about possibilities for engaging in this kind of work today and in the future Structure: To be determined in partnership with partners at NCCU and young North Carolina activists NOTE: Later on March 24, there will be a closing reception for the SNCC Digital Gateway Project; 7 p.m., location TBD. Reception guests include project partners and closing event participants celebrating the accomplishments of the SNCC Digital Gateway project.

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Publishing Data with Research and Other Strategies for Increasing Your Impact

Wednesday, March 28, 2:00 PM
Perkins 217
West Campus

Scholars can and do communicate their research in various ways. While peer-reviewed journal publications remain the primary outlet for sharing the key results of research projects, there are growing norms (and expectations) that the underlying data from projects should also be published. In this workshop, we will look at 1) strategies to effectively publish data; 2) journal policies related to data sharing; 3) new types of publications such as data articles and registered reports; and 4) strategies for increasing and measuring the impact of your research. There will also be a hands-on portion of the workshop where participants will create their own ORCID identifier.

Please bring a laptop to fully participate in this workshop.

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SSRI~ Workshop: Program Evaluation

Wednesday, March 28, 2:30 PM
SSRI-Gross Hall 230E
West Campus
This workshop offers an overview of program evaluation, or the systematic investigation of the merit, worth, or significance of a program. Topics covered will include: when and why to conduct evaluation; types of evaluations; key aspects of an evaluation, including logic model development, data sources and data collection, analysis and reporting, and guiding resultant programmatic change; and tips for feasibly and effectively implementing evaluation at a program or organization. This workshop focuses on evaluation from the perspective of programs or organizations and will be of particular interest to people working in such settings who are looking to learn more about evaluation, but it is also relevant to undergraduate students, graduate students, faculty, or other researchers who are interested in evaluation and applied research. Registration required; please click "More Information" below to access the registration form.

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VFF: Visual analytics for Duke Health using Tableau

Friday, March 30, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend.

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Managing Sensitive Data

Wednesday, April 4, 1:00 PM
Perkins 217
West Campus

In the course of your research you may collect, interact with or analyze data that are classified as “Sensitive” or "Restricted" according to Duke's data classification standard. In this workshop we will examine common sensitive data types, how Duke’s IRB and Information Technology Security Office (ITSO) expects you to protect that data throughout your project’s lifecycle and the resources available to you for sensitive data storage and analysis, data de-identification, and data archiving and sharing.

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SSRI~ Workshop: Using NVivo 11 for Qualitative Analysis of Text in the Mac Environment

Wednesday, April 4, 3:00 PM
SSRI-Gross Hall 230E
West Campus
This workshop will introduce researchers to the basics of NVivo 11 Pro for Mac, a qualitative data analysis software. Participants will learn strategies for analyzing text-based data in NVivo, such as transcribed interviews and focus groups, documents, and literature. Topics will include how to import data, create nodes and code, tips for formatting transcriptions, and basic queries and visualizations. Although Windows users are welcome to attend, this workshop will not address using NVivo in the Windows environment. Registration required; please click the "more event information" button below to access the registration form.

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Grading Student Writing

Thursday, April 5, 12:15 PM
Other (see event description)
West Campus

Grading student writing can be a frustrating and time-consuming affair. This session offers advice on approaches to grading and designing context-appropriate guidelines and rubrics.

Note: this workshop is oriented toward the humanities and interpretive social sciences.

Presenter: Cary Moskovitz, Director, Writing in the Disciplines, Thompson Writing Program

Soc/Psych 331.
Lunch provided. Capped at 12 participants.
Please register at: https://duke.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_3HQR4PZrWcnjg8t

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Visualization Friday Forum

Friday, April 6, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend.

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Using Online Tools to Build Undergraduate Research Skills [Munch & Mull]

Monday, April 9, 12:00 PM
West Campus

How can online tools improve students’ research skills? Adela Deanova, Duke doctoral candidate in Philosophy, took on that question. As a 2016-2017 Bass Instructional Fellow apprenticing with the Center for Instructional Technology (CIT), she focused on how to build archival research skills while innovating a traditional course. (Read more about Adela and the Bass OA project here: https://cit.duke.edu/blog/2016/12/innovative-teaching-undergraduate-philosophy-bass-online-apprentice-project/).

Adela used the course management tool Sakai (https://sakai.duke.edu/) and the new portfolio tool Pebble Pad (https://portfolio.duke.edu/) to create modular archival research activities for students in Professor Andrew Janiak's Gender and Philosophy course. Creating these smaller, scaffolded tasks and then providing students with a means to digitally publish their work (and instructors an easy way to evaluate that work) offers a novel approach for building students literacy in research methods and digital publishing.

Join us for a brown-bag conversation with Adela about this approach to building undergraduate students’ research skills. Light refreshments will be served. This talk, co-sponsored by CIT, is part of the Munch & Mull Digital Scholarship series.

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SSRI~ Workshop: Using NVivo 11 for Qualitative Analysis of Text in the Windows Environment

Wednesday, April 11, 3:00 PM
SSRI-Gross Hall 230E
West Campus
This workshop will introduce researchers to the basics of NVivo 11 Pro for Windows, a qualitative data analysis software. Participants will learn strategies for analyzing text-based data in NVivo, such as transcribed interviews and focus groups, documents, and literature. Topics will include how to import data, create nodes and code, tips for formatting transcriptions, and basic queries and visualizations. Although Mac users are welcome to attend, this workshop will not address using NVivo in the Mac environment. Registration required; please click "more information" to access the registration form.

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VFF: Teaching Visualization for Data Science

Friday, April 13, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend.

more information »

[Munch & Mull Digital Scholarship Discussion Group]

Monday, May 7, 12:00 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

more information »

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