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Research Data Management 101 for Scientists

Monday, March 2, 1:30 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Scientists work with lots of data both big and small, and in many formats and systems. This workshop will introduce data management practices for scientists to consider and apply throughout the research lifecycle. Good data management practices pertaining to planning, organization, documentation, storage and backup, sharing, citation, and preservation will be presented through a sciences lens using discipline-based, concrete examples. During the workshop, participants will also engage in discussions with their peers on data management concepts as well as learn about one specific tool as a method to assess how tools can enable specific data management practices. The tool explored in this workshop will be GitHub - a robust version control tool.

While good general data management practices are relevant across disciplines, participants working specifically within the sciences are the intended audience for this workshop.

This workshop is eligible for 2 hours of Graduate School RCR Credits.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Research Data Management 101 for Scientists

Monday, March 2, 1:30 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Scientists work with lots of data both big and small, and in many formats and systems. This workshop will introduce data management practices for scientists to consider and apply throughout the research lifecycle. Good data management practices pertaining to planning, organization, documentation, storage and backup, sharing, citation, and preservation will be presented through a sciences lens using discipline-based, concrete examples. During the workshop, participants will also engage in discussions with their peers on data management concepts as well as learn about one specific tool as a method to assess how tools can enable specific data management practices. The tool explored in this workshop will be GitHub - a robust version control tool.

While good general data management practices are relevant across disciplines, participants working specifically within the sciences are the intended audience for this workshop.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

R Open Lab: semi-structured opportunities for learning R

Monday, March 2, 6:00 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Part of the Rfun learning series

Come once or come each week: This six-week, semi-guided hour provides a safe and comfortable environment for learning more about the R programming language, RStudio, and the Tidyverse. The curriculum is based on the Master the Tidyverse workshop. The series goal is to enable researchers and students a low-stress hour to hone your own data savvy skills. Attendees will gain greater familiarity with a tool-suite designed to foster reproducibility and transparency vital for the researcher's workflow.

In the first meeting we will introduce R, RStudio and the Tidyverse as well as outline several self-directed learning resources (below). Follow and join any of the the remining weekly sessions. Each week covers a new topic in the Master the Tidyverse series. Reinforcement is on-your-own through self-directed resources. Assignments are optional. Intermediate and advanced users will, optionally, design your own curriculum and benefit from interacting and supporting a helpful network of campus R users.

Event Dates are all on Mondays: Jan. 13, Feb. 3, Feb. 10, Feb. 17, Feb. 24, March 2.

See our FAQ for more information.

NOTE: Bring your laptop. The Edge Workshop Room does not provide computers.

NOTE 2: If you need help configuring your laptop for this workshop, come to the DVS Walk-In Hours before the workshop: Wednesdays between 1-3pm. (Floor Map for Bostock Library > 1st Floor > Brandaleone Lab for Data and Visualization Services.)

more information »

Digital Brown Bag | Conducting bibliometric research with tidyJSTOR

Wednesday, March 4, 12:00 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

JSTOR Data for Research allows researchers to text mine content in JSTOR’s extensive archive of scholarly literature; journal articles, primary sources, and books; textual content (metadata or OCR-ed full text) can be assembled into a downloadable dataset for analysis with one’s own tools. Arthur Netto, a Ph.D. student at the University of São Paulo and fellow of the Center for the History of Political Economy at Duke University, started using R bibliometric tools to make NGRAM plots of JSTOR data, but found he needed – and then created – more functions for analyzing the content. He wrapped everything into a single R package – tidyJSTOR – and uploaded the package to Github in order to disseminate it and receive comments on code and functions.

At this Digital Brown Bag talk, Arthur will talk about the research questions motivating his use of JSTOR’s Data for Research, the potential and limitations of existing R bibliometric tools, and the additional features he’s built into tidyJSTOR. As a self-taught R user and self-taught user of bibliometrics, he’s also eager to hear others’ approaches and suggestions. If you’d like to check out tidyJSTOR before the talk, please do! You can access the tool and the tutorial here: https://github.com/arthurbnetto/tidyJSTOR.

more information »

Low Maintenance Book Club reads selections from "Broad Band"

Wednesday, March 4, 5:30 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

This spring, the Low Maintenance Book Club will be reading selections from Claire L. Evan's Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet over three meetings. Spanning decades, this book profiles key figures who made advances in programming and technology that led to the online world of today.

Each meeting will feature stand-alone selections from this book, so it is not necessary to attend all meetings to follow along. At this meeting, we'll discuss Chapter 6: "The Longest Cave" (p. 83-94) and Chapter 10: "Hypertext" (p.153-174).

Multiple copies of this book can be found at Duke University Libraries, and Durham County Library.

Spring 2020 meeting schedule:

  • January 22, 5:30pm: Introduction (p. 1-5) and Chapter 2: "Amazing Grace" (p. 27-53)
  • March 4, 5:30pm : Chapter 6: "The Longest Cave" (p. 83-94) and Chapter 10: "Hypertext" (p.153-174).
  • April 7, 5:30pm: Chapter 13: "The Girl Gamers" (p. 222-236) and the Epilogue (p. 237-242). RSVP for this meeting: https://duke.libcal.com/event/6416720 .

more information »

Duke's Unique Teaching Spaces: 3D Printer Lab

Thursday, March 5, 2:00 PM
Technology Engagement Center (TEC)
West Campus

The 3D printer labs on campus allow faculty from a wide range of disciples to teach topics such as design, computer programming, and cultural explorations in the humanities through printing 3D models. Visit one lab during this event to learn about the kinds and locations of printers available on campus, understand the basics of how 3D printers work, hear more about training, and discover other instructors' projects.

Event location: Co-Lab located in the TEC (Technology Engagement Center), TelComm Drive.


In this Spring 2020 event series, Duke’s Unique Teaching Spaces, find out about spaces outside the traditional classroom that you can reserve for class meetings, and which can offer your students opportunities for deep research and engagement. Register for one or more of the upcoming sessions:

Mar 19: The Rubenstein Arts Center

Mar 26: The Game Lab

Apr 2: The Duke Campus Farm

Apr 23: Duke Gardens

more information »

Visualization Friday Forum

Friday, March 6, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend.

more information »

Intro to R: Data Transformations, Data Structures, and the Tidyverse

Tuesday, March 17, 5:45 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Part of the DataFest Workshop Series

An introduction to R and the Tidyverse, using RStudio. This hands-on session introduces data wrangling, visualization, and Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA). We will provide an overview of the Tidyverse -- a consistent set of data science packages -- focusing on dplyr (data wrangling) and ggplot2 (visualizations) packages.

This workshop is part of the Rfun learning series: "R We Having Fun Yet‽" Learn more at https://rfun.library.duke.edu/

NOTE: Bring your laptop. The Edge Workshop Room does not provide computers.

NOTE 2: If you need help configuring your laptop for this workshop, come to the DVS Walk-In Hours before the workshop: Wednesdays between 1-3pm. (Floor Map for Bostock Library > 1st Floor > Brandaleone Lab for Data and Visualization Services.)

NOTE 3: Workshop location is different than the location for laptop configuration help.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Digital Brown Bag

Wednesday, March 18, 12:00 PM
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Join us for a conversation with Sylvia Miller, Senior Program Manager at the Franklin Humanities Institute and Duke University Press’s project liaison for the Carlyle Letters Online (CLO), to hear about a new online John Ruskin Archive that will connect to the CLO via the fascinating Ruskin-Carlyle correspondence. While the CLO has a long history of editorial and technological development, the new project has only a short time to launch a scalable prototype.

The theme of this session will be the challenges of balancing project-specific goals with scalability to enable the future aspirations of the Victorian Lives & Letters Consortium. With a one-year grant from the Delmas Foundation and student developers at the University of South Carolina who will finish work at the end of the Spring semester, the project team has to move fast and make pragmatic decisions. Sylvia will share behind-the-scenes project-management strategies, and she looks forward to ideas and feedback from you.

more information »

Data Science Tools Showcase: Spatial Analysis with R and Python

Wednesday, March 18, 1:00 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Some people who want to do spatial (geographic) analysis don’t know ArcPro or QGIS, but do know R or Python. In this workshop, we will present a command-line, or code-driven, approach to working with geospatial data. This method offers several advantages over traditional GIS software that can make your work easier, faster, and more reproducible!

We will share a showcase of spatial data science workflows that demonstrate the possibilities opened up by tools available from the command-line and scripting for processing, analyzing and visualizing data.

This workshop would be helpful for participants with some GIS experience who want to expand their data science toolkit, or for those who currently use R and/or Python and are curious about the geospatial capabilities of these languages.

Some basic familiarity with programming in R and/or Python will make this workshop more useful. We encourage anyone without this background to attend (or watch a recording of) our Introduction to R or Python for Data Science workshops.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Visualization in R using ggplot2

Wednesday, March 18, 5:45 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Part of the DataFest Workshop Series

NOTE: Bring your laptop. The Edge Workshop Room does not provide computers.

Data science skills are increasingly important for research and industry projects. With complex data science projects, however, come complex needs for understanding and communicating analysis processes and results. Ultimately, an analyst's data science toolbox is incomplete without visualization skills. Incorporating effective visualizations directly into the analysis tool you are using can facilitate quick data exploration, streamline your research process, and improve the reproducibility of your research.

In this workshop we will focus on ggplot2, a library for R that creates clear and well-designed visualizations and that plays well with other tidyverse packages. While prior experience with ggplot2 and with other tidyverse packages is not required, some basic familiarity with R is expected. Please consider attending (or viewing a recording of) our Introduction to R workshop before attending this workshop on ggplot2.

In this workshop, we will use RStudio and RMarkdown files for all exercises. This room does not have computers, so you will need to bring your own laptop. Please make sure you come with RStudio and the tidyverse package installed. You may also want to install the knitr package to be able to compile the entire Rmarkdown file.

Please note: this classroom has a limited number of seats. If you choose to register for the workshop, please make every effort to attend, or if you cannot, please cancel your registration as soon as a conflict comes up. If all spots fill up, we will maintain a waitlist in the event of cancelations. In addition, a previous version of this workshop has been recorded, and the associated files are available on GitHub. If you can't attend but would like to be notified when a recording is available, please contact Angela Zoss.

NOTE: this workshop will run from 6pm to 8pm. The room will be available starting at 5pm, and pizza will be provided starting at 5pm.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Intro to Gephi for Network Visualization

Friday, March 20, 10:00 AM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

Networks (or graphs) are a compelling way of studying relationships between people, places, object, ideas, etc. Generating network data and visualizations, however, can be an involved and unintuitive process requiring specialized tools. This workshop will explore some of the easier ways to produce, load, and visualize network data using Gephi, an open source, multi-platform network analysis and visualization application.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Retractions in Science and Social Science Literature

Friday, March 20, 12:00 PM
Bostock Library - The Edge Workshop Room
First Floor
This workshop will discuss the burgeoning phenomena of retractions in the scientific and social scientific literature. No one plans to have an article retracted, so we will cover what to do to avoid or address a retraction or expression of concern and what the existing editorial literature can offer if you do find yourself dealing with a retraction as an author or one of a group of authors. Lunch will not be provided as part of this workshop, but feel free to bring your own. *Although anyone may register, this event will be most useful to students in the social sciences, engineering and the natural sciences.

more information »

Film: Public Vodun Ceremonies in Haiti

Friday, March 20, 7:00 PM
John Hope Franklin Center, Ahmadieh Family Conference Hall, Room 240
Ahmadieh Family Conference Hall
Dir. Yvonne Payne Daniel (1997) 56 minutes This documentary by Yvonne Payne Daniel shows three traditional Vodun ceremonies being performed in Haiti. Free and open to the public. Food and beverages available.

more information »

Dashboards, slides, and R Markdown

Tuesday, March 24, 1:30 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Part of the Rfun learning series

Explore the variety of reports that can be generated with R. Learn to compose dashboards while easily implementing the inherent interactivity of HTMLWidgets orchestrated through R and RStudio.

Flexible and reproducible reports are easily produced using literate programming techniques. The R/RStudio/Tidyverse suite enables you to render your analysis into a wide variety of elegant reports. Simplicity is a key factor. An R notebook can be repurposed to produce interactive dashboards, slides, e-books, journal articles, PDF documents, MS Word, MS Power Point, Excel, Web Pages, Web Sites, and more. R Markdown is the key to structuring your final report document. Code chunks containing R code, within literate programming scripts, enable any R author to reproducibly render multiple report outputs. These techniques enable you to reach your target audience.

Come learn how to produce dashboards and slides. Add interactivity with an artful selection of easily leveraged HTML Widgets. Along the way you'll learn how you can render your analysis script into an array of different report outputs, pursuant to your audience needs.

Prerequisites:

NOTE: Bring your laptop.

  1. Use a cloud version of R, or install R & RStudio in advance (instructions)
  2. Install the tidyverse, flexdashboard, crostalk, leaflet, DT, plotly, and dygraphs packages in advance (instructions)

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Presenting Data Science Results to Stakeholders

Tuesday, March 24, 5:45 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Part of the DataFest Workshop Series

Communicating with stakeholders is a core process in any data science project. For most projects, stakeholder communication happens regularly to ensure that the analysis and outputs are structured to meet stakeholder needs. For some groups of stakeholders, however, the only ability to interact will be in a final presentation. This presentation will focus on strategies for developing a short presentation that summarizes a data science project, including: identifying a compelling story in the analysis; leading with the key takeaways; and presenting results simply, effectively, and visually.

NOTE: This is not a hands-on workshop. No computers are required.

ALSO NOTE: this workshop will run from 6pm to 7pm. The room will be available starting at 5pm, and pizza will be provided starting at 5pm.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Durham Public Library registration table

Wednesday, March 25, 11:00 AM
Other (see event description)
West Campus

Durham Public Library will have a registration table in Perkins Library on West Campus, in the lobby in front of the entrance to the Perk Cafe (Von Der Heyden Pavilion). Come get your public library card and gain access to all the amazing options for free digital and print content that the public library provides. It’s not just print books: you can stream and download thousands of e-books, e-audiobooks, magazines, movies, music, and more!

What do I need to bring?

  • Faculty/staff: A government-issued photo ID (license, passport, etc.) with a Durham address. If your ID has not been updated with your Durham address, bring a piece of mail that has your name and Durham mailing address on it (such as a utility bill) along with your photo ID. This address cannot be a P.O. Box.
  • Students: You can get a card regardless of whether you live in Durham! Bring any government-issued photo ID and your Duke ID card. You are eligible for a free temporary student card, which can be renewed annually by proving you are still a student at Duke. You can access all the same materials, but can only check out 10 items at a time. If you do live in Durham, you can get a regular library card by following the instructions for faculty/staff above.

How long will it take? Approximately 3 minutes! You’ll get your card right there. Note that your library card PIN (required to log in on the website and check out digital materials) is automatically set to be the last four digits of your phone number.

More about the public library

Great programming! On top of having tons of great materials to lend, the Durham Public Library has a wide array of adult programming, with everything from history, politics, and book talks to yoga, Mahjong, seed sorting, knitting, oragami, bookclubs, and karaoke. They also have extensive programming for children and teens.

New library! In early 2020, the Durham Public Library will be opening a renovated, state-of-the-art central library in downtown Durham with free wifi and great spaces to study and read, as well as meeting rooms, an auditorium, a MakerLab, outdoor public plaza, and a cafe. See building plans and read more here:
https://blogs.library.duke.edu/blog/2018/02/21/sneak-peek-downtown-durhams-new-main-library/

Explore the public libraries digital offerings:

https://durhamcountylibrary.org/materials/digital-collections/

  • Ebooks
  • E-audiobooks
  • Streaming movies and TV
  • Streaming music
  • Popular digital magazine subscriptions (Rolling Stone, the Economist, National Geographic, Wired, the New Yorker, Cosmo, and more!)
  • Digital newspaper subscriptions
  • ...and more!

more information »

Tackling Data Competition Challenges: Strategies for Success

Wednesday, March 25, 5:45 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Part of the DataFest Workshop Series

Getting a new big dataset with a short deadline for data exploration, analysis, and communication of results is a common challenge; doing so with a new team for a DataFest, Datathon, or other competition adds extra complexity.

You'll be assigned a team at the start (or may bring your own). We will provide the large public dataset and challenge; you will get hands-on practice at deciding where to begin, how to break up tasks across a team, and how to manage your workflow to produce the deliverables. The assigned task will be modest; our goal is to improve your metacognitive strategies for successfully managing a data challenge.

The workshop facilitators are from the Department of Statistical Science. Choose your own software tools. Bring your own laptop.

more information »

Beyond the manuscript: Sharing humanistic "data" in the digital age

Friday, March 27, 11:45 AM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

When do digitized or born digital research materials become “data”? From images to maps to text corpora to historical records, humanists work with and create various types of materials as part of their research. Across disciplines, there are increasing discussions surrounding the merits, challenges, and ethics of sharing one’s research in order to support new scholarship, facilitate interdisciplinary collaborations, and increase transparency. How does humanities research challenge efforts and assumptions around sharing data? What opportunities arise when humanities data is more readily available for others to use? The following panelists will explore questions surrounding the conceptualization of “data” within the humanities as well as the cultural and ethical dimensions of sharing this type of research in the digital age.

Panelists include:

  • Ed Tripplett, PhD, Art, Art History, and Visual Studies
  • Thavolia Glymph, PhD, History and Law
  • Astrid Giugni, PhD, English

Lunch will be provided. Registration is required for planning purposes.

more information »

Film: The Kingdom of Impunity

Friday, March 27, 7:00 PM
John Hope Franklin Center, Ahmadieh Family Conference Hall, Room 240
Ahmadieh Family Conference Hall
Dir. Arnold Antonin (2013) 65 minutes "During the 29 years of the Duvalier's rule, mass crimes were committed at different times, in different parts of the country against people of all classes and social groups, political or religious affiliations and of all skin shades. At a time when Jean-Claude Duvalier is called to court, will justice decide in favor of the victims? More than 50 witnesses, for and against examine this issue in a powerful face to face." Free and open to the public. Food and beverages available.

more information »

Research Reproducibility: Tips and Tools

Tuesday, March 31, 1:30 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

In response to a growing focus on the importance of reproducibility, replication, and transparency in the research endeavor, scholars are adapting their practices and learning new skills and tools. This workshop will introduce some foundational strategies that can increase the reproducibility of your work. You will also learn about specific tools and protocols that you might use within your research workflows including the TIER protocol, git and GitHub, and online containerization tools such as Binder and Code Ocean.

This workshop is eligible for 2 hours of Graduate School RCR Credits.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Research Reproducibility: Tips and Tools

Tuesday, March 31, 1:30 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

In response to a growing focus on the importance of reproducibility, replication, and transparency in the research endeavor, scholars are adapting their practices and learning new skills and tools. This workshop will introduce some foundational strategies that can increase the reproducibility of your work. You will also learn about specific tools and protocols that you might use within your research workflows including the TIER protocol, git and GitHub, and online containerization tools such as Binder and Code Ocean.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

SSRI~ Workshop: Program Evaluation

Tuesday, March 31, 2:00 PM
SSRI-Gross Hall 230E
West Campus
This workshop offers an overview of program evaluation, or the systematic investigation of the merit, worth, or significance of a program. Topics covered will include: when and why to conduct evaluation; types of evaluations; key aspects of an evaluation, including logic model development, data sources and data collection, analysis and reporting, and guiding resultant programmatic change; and tips for feasibly and effectively implementing evaluation at a program or organization. This workshop focuses on evaluation from the perspective of programs or organizations and will be of particular interest to people working in such settings who are looking to learn more about evaluation, but it is also relevant to undergraduate students, graduate students, faculty, or other researchers who are interested in evaluation and applied research. Registration required; please click the "more event information" button below to access the registration form.

more information »

Intro to Tableau: Easy Charts and Maps

Tuesday, March 31, 5:45 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Part of the DataFest Workshop Series

Tableau Public (available for both Windows and Mac) is free software that allows individuals to quickly and easily explore their data with a wide variety of visual representations, as well as create interactive web-based visualization dashboards. This workshop will focus on using Tableau Public to create data visualizations, starting with an overview of how the program thinks about data, common data manipulation and loading, and the terminology used. Activities will include a sample data visualization and mapping project, which will give people hands-on experience using Tableau’s basic chart types and dashboard creation tools. We will also discuss publishing to the Tableau Public web server and related services and tools, like the full Tableau Desktop application (free for full-time students).

NOTE: Bring your laptop. The Edge Workshop Room does not provide computers.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Visualization Friday Forum

Friday, April 3, 12:00 PM
LSRC D106
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend.

more information »

The empowered author: evaluating publishers, negotiating contracts, and navigating the scholarly publishing ecosystem

Monday, April 6, 1:00 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

When you’re getting started as an author, it can feel like someone else is setting all the rules and that the way things work now is the way it has always been. But current scholarly publishing models have only been around for the past couple of decades, and authors have more agency than they often assume. This is a workshop about the process of being an author, about getting published and getting the rewards of being published, while sharing the benefits of your research with as broad an audience as possible. Through a mix of lecture and hands-on activities you will learn about methods to:

  • evaluate publishers, avoiding “predatory” journals and scams,
  • analyze and negotiate publication contracts, and
  • increase the reach of your work outside of traditional publications.

This workshop is eligible for 2 hours of Graduate School RCR credits.

Some tasks may be performed online; bringing a laptop is recommended but not required.

This room is wheelchair-accessible. Presenters will use a microphone. Workshop slides and other materials can be provided in digital or print format. Please contact the presenters (elena.feinstein@duke.edu, paolo.mangiafico@duke.edu) if other accommodations would be helpful.

more information »

Research Data Management 201: How and where to publish your data

Tuesday, April 7, 1:00 PM
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

Data management practices help researchers take care of their data throughout the entire research process from the planning phase to the end of a project when data might be shared or “published” within a repository. Building upon the foundational concepts covered in the Data Management 101 courses offered this year, this workshop will provide hands-on experience where participants will learn strategies for how to prepare data for publishing by “curating” an example dataset and identifying common data issues. Participants will also learn about the overall role of repositories within the data sharing landscape and learn strategies for locating and assessing repositories.

Participants are not required to have taken a Data Management 101 course (although it is recommended). This workshop is also a reconceptualization of the previously offered “RDM 201: Preparing Your Data for Publishing” and “Finding a Home for Your Data: An Introduction to Archives and Repositories” workshops offered in previous semesters - participants who have attended these previous workshops should not attend.

This workshop is eligible for 2 hours of Graduate School RCR Credits.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Cameras will capture the instructor station and the display screen. Ambient audio, including verbal audience participation, will be included on the recording. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

more information »

Low Maintenance Book Club reads selections from "Broad Band"

Tuesday, April 7, 5:30 PM
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

This spring, the Low Maintenance Book Club will be reading selections from Claire L. Evan's Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet over three meetings. Spanning decades, this book profiles key figures who made advances in programming and technology that led to the online world of today.

Each meeting will feature stand-alone selections from this book, so it is not necessary to attend all meetings to follow along. At this meeting, we'll discuss Chapter 13: "The Girl Gamers" (p. 222-236) and the Epilogue (p. 237-242).

Multiple copies of this book can be found at Duke University Libraries, and Durham County Library.

Spring 2020 meeting schedule:

  • January 22, 5:30pm: Introduction (p. 1-5) and Chapter 2: "Amazing Grace" (p. 27-53)
  • March 4, 5:30pm : Chapter 6: "The Longest Cave" (p. 83-94) and Chapter 10: "Hypertext" (p.153-174).
  • April 7, 5:30pm: Chapter 13: "The Girl Gamers" (p. 222-236) and the Epilogue (p. 237-242).

more information »

Book Talk: The American Story

Monday, April 13, 5:30 PM
Sanford Fleishman Commons
Co-founder of The Carlyle Group and philanthropist David M. Rubenstein will visit Duke for a discussion of his new book The American Story. The David M. Rubenstein Distinguished Lecture will take place in the Fleishman Commons at the Sanford School of Public Policy. The event, co-sponsored by Duke University Libraries, will be followed by a reception and book signing where the author will give away a limited number of books. The American Story takes readers on a sweeping journey through American history through conversations with historians such as David McCullough, Jon Meacham, Ron Chernow, and many more. David M. Rubenstein endowed the lecture in his name to bring thought leaders to Duke. He is a co-founder and co-executive chairman of The Carlyle Group, one of the world's largest and most successful private equity firms. Mr. Rubenstein is Chairman of the Boards of Trustees of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, the Smithsonian Institution, and the Council on Foreign Relations. Mr. Rubenstein is an original signer of The Giving Pledge and a recipient of the Carnegie Medal of Philanthropy and the MoMA's David Rockefeller Award, among other philanthropic awards. The host of The David Rubenstein Show on Bloomberg TV and PBS, he lives in the Washington, DC area. Parking: Public Policy Lot.

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Ciompi Quartet Lunchtime Classics

Thursday, April 23, 12:00 PM
Rubenstein Library Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room 153
The Ciompi Quartet and students in the Duke Chamber Music Program present a free, noontime concert of chamber works with discussion and commentary. The Ciompi Quartet was founded at Duke University in 1965 by the renowned Italian violinist Giorgio Ciompi. All its members are professors at Duke and play a leading role in its cultural life, in addition to traveling widely throughout the year for performances. In a career that includes many hundreds of concerts and spans five continents, the Ciompi Quartet has developed a reputation for performances of real intelligence and musical sophistication, and for a warm, unified sound that is enhanced by each player's strong individual voice. This concert is presented in association with Duke University Libraries.

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