Walking the talk

On March 7, 2014 By

All of the presentations at the SPARC Open Access meeting this week were excellent.  But there was one that was really special; an early career researcher named Erin McKiernan who brought everyone in the room to their feet to applaud her commitment to open access.  We are sometimes told that only established scholars who [...]

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My last post about copyright assignment and different versions of a scholarly article set off a small controversy, some of which can be found in the comments to that ppost and some of which took place on other social media venues.  Yesterday Richard Poynder posted to the Lib-License list about this discussion, and I felt [...]

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Starting today, the Electronic Frontier Foundation is sponsoring Copyright Week, which will last for six days.  Each day is dedicated to one of six principles that, EFF asserts, should guide copyright policy and practice.  They are, in my opinion, excellent principles, that really connect back to the original purpose of copyright as an engine for [...]

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To finish my thoughts about the Duke University Libraries Seminar on the Future of Researc h Libraries and the presentation made by Professor Ian Baucom, I want to turn to the final two issues we discussed – globalization and publishing.  And I want to be very clear that although I refer to Ian’s remarks a [...]

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Protecting IP?

On October 21, 2013 By

The American Association of University Professors recently issued a draft report, seeking comment, on the topic “Defending the Freedom to Innovate: Faculty Intellectual Property (IP) Rights After Stanford v. Roche.”  The report is very interesting; a strongly-worded warning that universities might be trying to assert more ownership over the IP rights in works [...]

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I do not usually link and re-post my own work on this site, but this situation is a little different.  I have written two columns for Library Journal’s Peer-to-Peer column about the WIPO’s successful negotiations to arrive at a treaty dealing with copyright limitations for the blind and visually impaired.  It seems odd  not to [...]

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In March the ACRL published a new White Paper on Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy: Creating Strategic Collaborations for a Changing Academic Environment which looks at the ways in which the dramatic changes taking place in the environment for scholarly communication have necessary consequences for nearly all librarians, and especially those who [...]

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The decision in the Kirtsaeng v. Wiley case was released this morning, and the outcome is wonderful for libraries.  I have not had the chance to read the whole opinion yet, but the upshot is that the Second Circuit rule that said that First Sale applied only to materials manufactured in the United States was [...]

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I seldom write a post that is just a link to someone else’s work, but I am afraid that non-specialists, especially in the U.S., may not regularly read the blog of Canadian law professor Ariel Katz.  And this post about the GSU case deserves widespread attention.  Katz does a wonderful job of pointing us [...]

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It seems simple, really

On December 14, 2012 By

I have to start by saying that I am not an economist, and I know just enough to understand that economic analysis is never simple or straightforward.  And yet, when these two different news items came to my attention in a short time frame, the link between the two of them still seemed pretty obvious.

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