The other shoe drops

On December 12, 2010 By

On Tuesday, Dec. 7, the educational trade group AIME and one of its members, Ambrose Video, finally filed the long- anticipated lawsuit against UCLA alleging that UCLA’s practice of streaming digitized video through its course management system to students registered for a specific class, was copyright infringement.

When several publishers filed suit against [...]

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Access Copyright is the Canadian equivalent of the U.S Copyright Clearance Center.  Like the CCC, which is helping to finance litigation against Georgia State University designed to force US universities to pay more and higher licensing fees for course materials, Access Copyright is also on a quest for ever greater income.

I and others have [...]

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Judge Orinda Evans of the Federal District Court in Atlanta issued her ruling yesterday on the cross motions for summary judgment in the copyright infringement lawsuit brought by three publishers against Georgia State University over course readings provided to students through e-reserves and the campus course management system.  The text of her decision is [...]

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Reading tea leaves

On August 18, 2010 By

In the ongoing copyright litigation between Georgia State University and Cambridge, Oxford and Sage publishers, we are at a stage where everyone is waiting for Judge Orinda Evans to rule on the cross motions for summary judgment.  In the interim before her ruling, it is fascinating to look at the orders she has issued [...]

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Dueling Myths

On August 4, 2010 By

It is a curious coincidence that in the past few weeks I have become aware of two different — very different indeed — documents which purport to refute common copyright myths.  The differences are easily understandable, given the two sources of the respective documents, and each reflects, to some degree, the prejudices natural to its [...]

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Yesterday’s announcement that the Library of Congress was designating new classes of works exempt from the anti-circumvention rules of the DMCA has generated lots of Internet buzz, especially about the exemption for those who “jailbreak” their cellular phones.  The major exemption for higher education, allowing circumvention by faculty for a range of defined educational purposes, [...]

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Last week I wrote, but had not yet posted, a comment about the proposed copyright reform in Brazil and the more nuanced approach they took to anti-circumvention rules that protect technological systems intended to prevent unauthorized access.  In the course of that discussion I again criticized the Library of Congress’ long delay in announcing new [...]

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On Wednesday the Duke Libraries’ Instruction and Outreach department held a retreat on the topic of “Digital Literacies.”  The excellent keynote speaker for the event was Ellysa Cahoy from Penn State University.  As part of the retreat, I spoke very briefly about copyright issues around the use of digital media.  My comments ended up [...]

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Both sides in the Georgia State copyright infringement case – which challenges as infringement the use of excerpts from copyrighted content in the University’s electronic reserves and course management systems – have now filed motions for summary judgment, with supporting briefs and affidavits.  The actual motions and arguments in support can be found here, [...]

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It has been widely reported that UCLA has decided to re-start its program of streaming digitized videos for course-related viewing.  They do so based on a set of principles adopted by the faculty, which can be read here.

Readers of this blog will recall that I have previously expressed ambivalence about whether and [...]

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