Tag Archives: advertisements

New Acquisitions: Advertising Aucas

Auca for a Barcelona bookstore, 1937.
Auca for a Barcelona bookstore, 1937.

In June and July we’re celebrating the beginning of a new fiscal year by highlighting new acquisitions from the past year. All of these amazing resources will be available for today’s scholars, and for future generations of researchers in the Rubenstein Library! Today’s post features a new collection in the Library’s Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising, and Marketing History. Check out additional posts in the series here.

Since being banned as a tool for gambling in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the auca has become one of the cultural touchstones of the Catalonia region of Spain.  Aucas are a kind of comic strip with a standardized format of panels (often 48, or another multiple of four) accompanied by rhyming verse.  The Hartman Center recently acquired a collection of more than fifty of these original broadsides, all produced and distributed for the purposes of advertising products or communicating a service. Aucas were traditionally used for communication of religious, literary, or civic information, but advertisers saw the value in taking the broadside format and using it for commercial purposes.

Auca for an insecticide containing D.D.T., Tarragona, ca. 1960.
Auca for an insecticide containing D.D.T., Tarragona, ca. 1960.

The numerous examples here of aucas published in Barcelona or nearby cities in the Catalan language during the 1940s and 1950s, run counter to the accepted belief that the Franco regime had completely suppressed the Catalan language. As these aucas show, the language still had a public presence (and perhaps the Regime tolerated its use in this particular fashion because the aucas were intended to generate commerce, which Spain desperately needed).

Mad Men Monday, Episode 12

Mad Men Mondays logo

Don stays home from work feigning illness and drinking too much, as he mourns what happened with Sally. Ken goes hunting with two Chevy executives and accidentally gets shot in the face. Betty tells Don that Sally doesn’t want to visit him anymore and that she wants to go to boarding school. Ted and Peggy’s fondness for each other becomes apparent to others in the office. Harry calls Don to tell him that Sunkist has approved a large media budget. Megan and Don go to the movies to see Rosemary’s Baby and run into Ted and Peggy.

Ken steps down from the Chevy account and Pete offers to take his place in Detroit. All of the partners except Ted are excited about the Sunkist news, but agree they need to start working more coherently on new business. Ted is angry that Ocean Spray will be resigned, but is conflicted since Sunkist is a bigger account. Pete is thwarted when he tries to move Bob off of the Chevy account. Duck Phillips tells Pete that Bob has lied about his education and work history.

Sally stays overnight at Miss Porter’s Boarding School and her student hosts demand alcohol and cigarettes. She calls her friend Glen, who arrives with liquor and a friend, Rolo, who has marijuana. Glen fights with Rolo when Sally accuses him of trying to force her to get physical, which makes her smile. The next day, a pleased Betty offers Sally a cigarette during the drive home from the boarding school visit.

Don tells a St Joseph’s aspirin executive that their expensive commercial was Frank Gleason’s last idea, which gets the client to approve a budget increase, but undermines Ted and Peggy. Later Don tells Ted that his feelings for Peggy are impairing Ted’s judgement. Pete confronts Bob about his identity fraud, but offers a truce so they can work together, as long as Pete is “off limits.” Peggy yells at Don for ruining the St. Joseph’s situation for her and Ted.

Episode twelve referred to vodka and orange juice, hunting, Nixon’s campaign, Cranprune juice, travelers checks, and Rosemary’s Baby, among other things. Here is a selection of ads and images that illustrate some of the products and cultural references mentioned in last night’s Mad Men. A gallery of our highlighted images may also be found on Pinterest and Flickr.

Smirnoff - Blog

shot guns - master - Blog

New England life - hunting - Blog

AAA2126 cropped - Blog

travelers checks - Blog

cranprune juice - Blog

St Joseph childrens asprin - 2

 

Mad Men Monday Tuesday, Episode 9

Mad Men Mondays logo

A number of characters faced choices between two people, while others faced rejection or criticism.  Peggy is encouraged to choose between Ted and Don’s ideas for Fleischmann’s margarine. Megan’s performance as twins is criticized. Arlene tries to console Megan, but her sexual advances are spurned. Betty’s slimmed down figure gets a lot of attention from a man at a dinner party, which excites Henry. In frustration, Pete consults with headhunter Duck Phillips about alternative positions. Ted tells Peggy that he has feelings for her, but also that he regrets kissing her. Betty and Don visit Bobby at summer camp.  They reconnect in a happy family moment over lunch and later spend the night together. Don is nostalgic and sentimental about Betty, while she is frank about his shortcomings.  The next morning she happily eats breakfast with Henry, while Don eats alone as if nothing ever happened. Joan and Bob go to the beach with her son, Kevin.  Roger tries to reconnect with Joan with a gift for Kevin, but she rebuffs him.  Roger is also reprimanded by his daughter after taking his grandson to see Planet of the Apes. Peggy is fearful of the crime in her new neighborhood. After a rock is thrown through their apartment window, she arms herself with a knife and accidentally stabs Abe in the abdomen.  In the ambulance Abe breaks up with Peggy, calling her the enemy because of her advertising career. The next day Peggy tells Ted that she and Abe broke up, but Ted seems unmoved by the news and wishes her well in finding someone new.

Episode nine’s plot referred to Esso gasoline, menthol cigarettes, knives, 1965 Cadillacs, and chef salads, among other things.  Here is a selection of ads that illustrate some of the products and cultural references mentioned in Sunday night’s Mad Men.  A gallery of our highlighted images may also be found on Pinterest and Flickr.

Cadilliac - BlogResized

Esso - BlogResized

air conditioner - Blog

winston menthol - Blog

Canadian club - Blog

Cutco knives - BlogResized

Mad Men Monday, Episode 7

Mad Men Mondays logo

The CGC staff move into the SCDP office space and everyone scrambles to figure out their place at the new agency.  A number of staff members get laid off. Don meets Sylvia at a hotel for a daytime tryst.  Ted leads a creative meeting discussing Fleischmann’s Margarine.  Later he and Don continue brainstorming over drinks in Ted’s office and Ted drinks too much.  Pete’s difficult mother shows up at his apartment and he becomes responsible for her care.  Because of her issues Pete misses an important meeting with Mohawk Airlines.  Ted and Don fly upstate to the Mohawk meeting in Ted’s airplane through a storm.  Sylvia waits for Don at the hotel at his request and a red dress is delivered to her room.  Joan is in pain and Bob Benson takes her discreetly to the emergency room, where he talks the nurse into admitting her.  Later Joan returns the favor by advocating for his job during a meeting about staffing cuts. Sylvia breaks off the affair with Don and he seems devastated.  The episode ends with news of Robert Kennedy’s assassination, which Megan watches in tears.

Episode seven’s plot referred to St. Joseph’s Children’s Aspirin, Fleischmann’s Margarine, Topaz Pantyhose, Mohawk Airlines, gin and tonics, among other things.  Enjoy our selection of ads and images that illustrate some of the products and cultural references mentioned in last night’s Mad Men.  A gallery of our highlighted images may also be found on Pinterest and Flickr.

 

St Joseph Aspirin for Children

Topaz hosery - Blog

Fleischmann's Margarine

 

Fly Mohawk

 

Gilbey's Gin
Cessna

 

Robert F Kennedy Newsweek Cover

 

 

The Accidental Archivist

Issues involved with the handling and preservation of ephemera—campaign buttons, stickers, scrapbooks, photo albums, brochures and pamphlets and such—have been an ongoing concern among curators and archivists, as many of our procedures and best practices concern materials commonly recognized as “important artifacts” such as art, works of prominent photographers, rare manuscripts and books. Many modern manuscript collections pose an additional challenge when they include files of clippings, the two-sided nature of which inadvertently creates an “accidental archive” of items of potential research interest. Many of the Hartman Center’s advertising collections suffer from this wealth of excess. Magazine and newspaper pages containing ads for one product frequently have an equally (if not more) useful ad on the reverse, or a provocative news article. In the example here, taken from the Doris Bryn Papers, the reverse side of a department store ad contains an article “Are Women Persons? Educators Disagree” that appeared in the Oct. 15, 1950 edition of the Sunday Herald.

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The backside of a 1950 advertisement for a department store wonders, “Are Women Persons?”

As indicative of the kinds of debates taking place during the postwar re-integration of women into domestic life and the slow march toward women’s rights and gender equality, the article poses potential research utility; at the least, great fodder for an undergraduate paper. The big challenge is: how to remember where to find these little gems the second time around?

Post contributed by Rick Collier, Technical Services Archivist for the John W. Hartman Center.

Mad Men Monday, Episode 5

Mad Men Mondays logo

Episode 5, which aired on April 28st, depicted the Mad Men characters reacting to the news that Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated. Across the board, everyone was upset and unnerved, but there was considerable awkwardness in their interactions with each other in the aftermath.  Pete and Harry argued about what was an appropriate reaction to the death.  Joan hugged Dawn. Don tried to send Dawn home, but she really wanted to stay at work. Megan took Sally and Gene to a vigil. Don took Bobby to the movies.  Peggy fretted over an offer to purchase an apartment. Betty and Henry saw an opportunity for his political career to blossom. Ginsburg tried not to bungle a date that his father set up for him. There were references to wallpaper, formal wear, Milk Duds, Planet of the Apes, and Chinese food, among other items.  Here are a selection of ads and images that refer to some of the products and cultural references mentioned in last night’s episode of Mad Men.  We’ve even included a program from the April 4, 1968 ANDY Awards and some photos of a vigil that occurred on Duke’s campus in the days after the assassination. Paul Newman really was the keynote speaker! A gallery of our selected images may also be found on Pinterest and Flickr.

Andy Awards cover - Blog

Andy Awards progaram of events - Blog

McCarthy for President - Blog

The Duke Vigil was a silent demonstration at Duke University, April 5 - 11, 1968, following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King. Up to 1,400 students slept on the Chapel Quad, food services and housekeeping employees went on strike, and most students boycotted the dining halls in support of the employees. Duke University Archives, University Archives Photograph Collection, box 54.
The Duke Vigil was a silent demonstration at Duke University, April 5 – 11, 1968, following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King. Up to 1,400 students slept on the Chapel Quad, food services and housekeeping employees went on strike, and most students boycotted the dining halls in support of the employees. Duke University Archives, University Archives Photograph Collection, box 54.
Duke Vigil, April 5-11, 1968.  Duke University Archives, University Archives Photograph Collection, box 54.
Duke Vigil, April 5-11, 1968. Duke University Archives, University Archives Photograph Collection, box 54.

Peerless wallpaper - Blogresized

Chinese food - blog

Aftersix - Blog

 

Mad Men Monday

MadMenLogo1

Don Draper and the whole gang were back last night with the premiere of Mad Men’s Season Six. If you are big fans of the show, like us, then join us as we look back at some ads that resonate with each episode of the new season in what we are calling Mad Men Mondays.

Last night’s episode featured references to the Royal Hawaiian Sheraton, Dow Oven Cleaner, fondue, Canadian Club Whiskey, and dieting, among other things. Enjoy our selection of highlighted ads and advertising cookbooks that reflect the brands and themes that Mad Men characters interacted with last night. A gallery of our selected images can also be found on Pinterest and Flickr.

CanClub-compAdsF330006

DowOven-compAdsH430007

Fondue-CompAds-1

FondueCookbook1960s-0097003  Reduce-compAdsF120009

SeagramCookbook1960sA-0011002

SheratonCompAds-T431010

Whiskey-CompAdsF330005

 

RIP, Andy Griffith

It’s a sad news day with the report that North Carolina-native Andy Griffith has died at age 86. Best known for his role as sheriff of the fictional Mayberry, Griffith is also a prominent figure in our AdViews Collection of vintage television commercials. Along with commercials for the Andy Griffith Show, Griffith advertised for a number of products, including Scope mouthwash, Post cereals, and Gaines dog food.

Video links available through the AdViews digital collection.

To watch Andy Griffith and his friends from Mayberry, visit the AdViews Collection portal on the Duke Library’s Digital Collections page. If you’re interested in researching Andy Griffith’s life and career, you should also visit the Southern Historical Collection at UNC, where his personal papers are housed.

Post contributed by Meghan Lyon, Technical Services Archivist in the Rubenstein Library.