Tag Archives: advertisements

Apollo_Pen_B310

Mad Men Mondays Tuesdays: Episode 7, “Waterloo”

Mad Men Mondays logo

Mad Men‘s  midseason finale juxtaposes the U.S. space program and Napoleon as twin parables on the successes and failures of grand vision and ambition. The Apollo 11 launch and landing on the moon in July 1969 provides a running theme through the episode, and creates a poignant contrast between everyday life and a preoccupation with events 100,000 miles out in space.

The episode opens with Bert Cooper trying to watch the Apollo liftoff and yelling at the maid to turn off the vacuum cleaner. Meanwhile in California, Ted Chaough’s existential crisis while flying over Claremont terrifies the Sunkist representatives; in a later phone call he tells Jim Cutler that he wants to leave advertising altogether. Lou Avery complains to Jim Cutler that Don’s appearance in the Philip Morris client meeting cost them the Commander business to Leo Burnett. Betty entertains house guests that include surly teenager Sean and his nerdy younger brother Neil. Harry’s partnership in the firm is still under consideration, not finalized, and serves as a nodal point in a power struggle between Jim Cutler and Roger Sterling. The creative team preps for their presentation to Burger Chef in Indianapolis, while Pete worries that “now we just have to pray everything goes smoothly on the moon.”

Elsewhere at the agency, SC&P staff members speculate on the consistency of the moon’s surface while Don receives a breach of contract letter from the agency attorney. It turns out that Jim Cutler had initiated the letter in an attempt to force Don out, a move that enrages some of the other partners who hadn’t been notified before their names were placed on the letter. Don calls for a vote on his status, which is affirmed with only Joan and Jim voting to remove him. Joan, bitter that Don’s actions have cost her money, nonetheless criticizes Jim for his tactics: “You shouldn’t have done that.” Don phones Megan to tell her about the tensions at the agency, but when he suggests to her that it may be an opportunity to start over on the west coast, Megan hesitates before breaking things off with Don.

On Sunday all eyes are watching the lunar landing on television; most are amazed but surly Sean complains about the cost of the space race. When Sally repeats this to Don over the phone, he tells her “Don’t be so cynical.” Bert Cooper says a quiet “Bravo.” Shortly after, Roger receives a call that Bert has died, and goes to the office to remove Bert’s name plate from his door. He meets Joan and Jim Cutler there. Jim uses Bert’s death to suggest an opportunity to get rid of Don, to which Roger objects. Roger informs Don of Bert’s passing, and Don goes to Peggy’s hotel room to tell her to do the Burger Chef presentation herself. Roger meets with an associate at McCann Erickson who wants the Chevy team for the Buick account, but Roger suggests that McCann buy a stake in SC&P. McCann is interested only if Roger can keep the creative team of Don and Ted together.

The Burger Chef management is wowed by Peggy’s presentation, where she used the lunar landing event as a symbol of people’s hunger for connection and turned it into an analogy for the kinds of connections often missed at family dinners mediated by ever-present television. Burger Chef, she argues, offers a place to re-connect families. Her presentation ultimately wins the account. When Don returns home from Indianapolis, Roger is waiting for him and tells him of the McCann offer. Roger says it’s the only way to save the agency, as he fears Jim won’t stop until he gets rid of everyone. The next day Roger calls a partners’ meeting to announce the McCann offer; Don talks Ted into staying on and the partners’ unanimously agree to the buyout—including Jim Cutler who sees he has been outmaneuvered by Roger. On his way back to his office, Don sees the ghost of Bert Cooper, singing “The Best Things in Life Are Free.”

Last night’s episode featured references to the space mission, Napoleon, Newport, Popsicle, electric percolators and The Wild Bunch, among other things. Enjoy our selection of highlighted ads that reflect the brands and themes that Mad Men characters interacted with last night.

A gallery of our selected images may also be found on Flickr.

Apollo_Pen_B310

Courvoisier_F330

Newports_G111

Presto_H220

Apollo_Launch_Invite

Popscicle_F160

Adding_Machine_B310

Kraft_Grape-_Jelly_F160

Wild_Bunch

Bike_G440

Astronaut_Toys_G450

You-Never-Had-Syrup-So-Good

Mad Men Mondays: Episode 6, “The Strategy”

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After weeks of angst and anxiety, Mad Men showed viewers a happier Don Draper and Peggy Olsen last night. They are finally back in sync and working well together. Peggy and Mathis survey mothers at a Burger Chef restaurant about their reasons for buying family dinners there. Pete and Bonnie fly to New York together. Peggy presents a seemingly successful Burger Chef pitch to Lou and others, but is told that Don should be the one to present it to the client, which angers her.

Megan comes to New York for the weekend and spends time looking for her fondue pot and other items she wants to bring back to Los Angeles, while Don tries to make her nostalgic for her New York home. Bob Benson comes to New York with representatives from Chevy.  He has to bail one of them out of jail and is told that GM will be pulling the Chevy account and giving it to Campbell-Ewald, but that Bob will be offered a job at Buick. Peggy second guesses the Burger Chef pitch and works on it all weekend.

Pete visits his daughter Tammy, who barely recognizes him, and he is angry that Trudy is not around.  He gets drunk and waits for her return, only to be told that he is no longer part of that family and doesn’t get to complain.  Bonnie is angry that Pete doesn’t spend time with her in New York and leaves to go back to Los Angeles.

Don comes in to help Peggy rework the Burger Chef campaign and they manage to have productive and candid conversations.  Their creative compatibility shows through and their conversations inspire a better pitch for Burger Chef. Bob visits with Joan and her family, bearing gifts for everyone.  He proposes to Joan, and tells her that a marriage would be good for both of them. She says no, stating that she will hold out for love. The SC&P partners meet to discuss losing Chevy.  They decide to make Harry Crane a partner, with some dissention from Joan and Roger. Don and Peggy meet Pete at a Burger Chef to sell him on the new pitch.

Last night’s episode featured references to loafers, Buick, Barbie, Fondue pots, among other things.  Enjoy our selection of highlighted ads that reflect the brands and themes that Mad Men characters interacted with last night.

A gallery of our selected images may also be found on Flickr.

You-Never-Had-Syrup-So-Good

Buick_T110

Leo_Burnett_B110

Loafers

AAA9660

Barbies_G450

Rheingold_F310

Erector_Set_G450

Bisquick_F113

Fondue_Cooking

Lighter_G120

Engagement_Ring_G210

Mad Men Mondays logo

Mad Men Monday – Season 7, Episode 4 “The Monolith”

Mad Men Mondays logo

The harsh reality of returning to SC&P has set in for Don in last night’s episode of Mad Men. He arrives at the seemingly empty office to discover the staff listening to the announcement that an IBM 360 computer will be installed in what was the creative lounge.  The creative staff grumbles about losing their space. Pete runs into an acquaintance who now works for Burger Chef and gets SC&P a chance to pitch that account.  Lou puts Peggy in charge of Burger Chef creative work, with Don reporting to her.  Peggy treats Don like an entry level copywriter and he starts behaving badly.  Roger and Mona find out that their daughter Margaret has run away to a hippie commune.  After her husband fails to get Margaret back, Mona and Roger drive to upstate New York to retrieve her.  Once at the commune, Mona storms off quickly, but Roger stays and lets Margaret show him why she loves it there.  Roger seems open minded about the commune, but later gets upset and tries to carry her off after she spends the night with one of the men there. After talking to the computer installer, Don suggests that SC&P prepare a presentation to LeaseTech, but Bert refuses.  Don starts drinking and later calls Freddie to invite him to a Mets game.  The next morning Freddie lectures Don and tells him he is wasting his second chance, advising him to buckle down and work hard. Don seems to get the message and goes to work ready to do what it takes to earn back the trust of his colleagues.

Last night’s episode featured references to Burger Chef, IBM 360, homemade jelly and gin, among other things.  Enjoy our selection of highlighted ads that reflect the brands and themes that Mad Men characters interacted with last night.

A gallery of our selected images may also be found on Flickr.

Burger_Chef_BBB1523

Hardhat_A170

IBM_AAA4902

Orange_Couch_H120

Spaghetti_F120

Typewriter_B110

Punchcards_B310

Fur_Coat_A170

Homemade_Jelly_F115

GIJoe2 (2)

Watch the GI Joe commercial: https://archive.org/details/dmbb23910

Booths_Gin_F330

 

Joey_Heatherton_A112

Mad Men Monday — Season 7, Episode 3 “Field Trip”

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Last night’s episode of Mad Men features several characters whose elevated hopes for connections with others get dashed.  Don flies out to Los Angeles after Megan’s agent calls him to say that she was desperate and demanding with a director after an audition. She is happy to see him, but then gets upset when she realizes why he came.  He is forced to admit that SC&P put him on leave and she asks him to go for being dishonest. Peggy is upset that her St. Joseph’s commercial wasn’t nominated for a Clio, and later finds out that Lou only submitted work that he could claim as his own. Betty meets Francine for lunch and Francine brags about her new career as a travel agent. She tells Betty that working in an office is her reward for raising kids.  Later Betty tells Bobby that she will chaperone his field trip the next day and he is thrilled to spend time with her. Harry exaggerates SC&P’s media capability to the clients from Koss, and later tells Jim that they need a computer to compete. Don meets with two men from Wells Rich Greene and gets an offer to work for them.  Don takes that offer to Roger, who agrees to let Don come back the following Monday. Betty and Bobby have a good time on the field trip until Bobby gives away Betty’s sandwich to a friend. Don arrives at SC&P on Monday morning, and awkwardly greets the staff until Roger comes in around lunchtime. The partners are upset that Don is back, but realize it will cost them too much to fire him officially.  Instead they agree to take him back only if he can adhere to several restrictive rules and reports to Lou. He agrees.

Last night’s episode featured references to typewriters, Kahlua, plaid jackets, and bras, among other things.  Enjoy our selection of highlighted ads that reflect the brands and themes that Mad Men characters interacted with last night.

A gallery of our selected images may also be found on Flickr.

Royal_Typewriter_B310

Weldwood_Paneling

Sara_Lee_Coffee_Cake_F130

Deansgate_Mens_Jacket_A112

Kahlua_F330

Bonny_Plaid_Jacket_A112

Joey_Heatherton_A112

Maidenform_Bra

Chicken_Salad

CocaCola_ValentinesDay_F220

Mad Men Monday – Season 7, Episode 2 “A Day’s Work”

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Last night’s episode of Mad Men depicts Valentine’s Day at SC&P. Several characters are upset when they are treated poorly or shuffled around, but by the end of the episode we see that there is housekeeping afoot that reveals new opportunities. Don’s day to day existence is exposed through sleeping late, cracker eating, and flipping through magazines.  Only when he is preparing for Dawn to come by and brief him does he clean up and get dressed to preserve the illusion that he is his normal steely self. Sally and her friends are given leave to go to New York City to attend the funeral of another friend’s mother and subsequently sneak off to go shopping before their return.  Once Sally realizes that she lost her purse, she goes to SC&P to ask Don for train fare.  Her encounter with Lou Avery exposes Don’s subterfuge and gets Dawn unfairly demoted to reception. Sally waits for Don at his apartment and when he returns from lunch with a contact at Wells Rich Greene he drives her back to boarding school. Peggy mistakes Shirley’s roses as ones for her from Ted, which causes a chain reaction of frustration and awkwardness for the two women. Joan is aggravated when her colleagues keep demanding that she solve their problems with secretarial staff by shifting them around. Pete is angry that he has to defer to Bob Benson and Chevrolet’s permission when he lands the SoCal Chevy Dealers Association account. Sally and Don finally have a frank conversation on the way back to school that begins to repair their damaged relationship. Jim Cutler offers Joan the opportunity to focus on account management, which allows her to leave behind the frustrations of human resources. Joan’s parting gesture as she moves to her new office is to reward Dawn with a promotion to human resources.  We see Dawn smile as she settles into her new office.

Last night’s episode featured references to Ritz crackers, Coffee Mate, Chevy Dealers Association, and Cutty Sark, among other things.  Enjoy our selection of highlighted ads that reflect the brands and themes that Mad Men characters interacted with last night.

A gallery of our selected images may also be found on Flickr.

Life_Drinking_PSA

 

L&M_G111

Ritz_F160

Bug_Spray_H240

CoffeeMate_F119

Sweet_n_Low_F123_folder1

AT&T_B140_Folder1

 

Life_Chevy_Dealer

Cutty_Sark_F330

Life_Sirhan

Engagement_Ring_G210

 

CocaCola_ValentinesDay_F220

Auca for a Barcelona bookstore, 1937.

New Acquisitions: Advertising Aucas

Auca for a Barcelona bookstore, 1937.
Auca for a Barcelona bookstore, 1937.

In June and July we’re celebrating the beginning of a new fiscal year by highlighting new acquisitions from the past year. All of these amazing resources will be available for today’s scholars, and for future generations of researchers in the Rubenstein Library! Today’s post features a new collection in the Library’s Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising, and Marketing History. Check out additional posts in the series here.

Since being banned as a tool for gambling in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the auca has become one of the cultural touchstones of the Catalonia region of Spain.  Aucas are a kind of comic strip with a standardized format of panels (often 48, or another multiple of four) accompanied by rhyming verse.  The Hartman Center recently acquired a collection of more than fifty of these original broadsides, all produced and distributed for the purposes of advertising products or communicating a service. Aucas were traditionally used for communication of religious, literary, or civic information, but advertisers saw the value in taking the broadside format and using it for commercial purposes.

Auca for an insecticide containing D.D.T., Tarragona, ca. 1960.
Auca for an insecticide containing D.D.T., Tarragona, ca. 1960.

The numerous examples here of aucas published in Barcelona or nearby cities in the Catalan language during the 1940s and 1950s, run counter to the accepted belief that the Franco regime had completely suppressed the Catalan language. As these aucas show, the language still had a public presence (and perhaps the Regime tolerated its use in this particular fashion because the aucas were intended to generate commerce, which Spain desperately needed).

cranprune juice - Blog

Mad Men Monday, Episode 12

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Don stays home from work feigning illness and drinking too much, as he mourns what happened with Sally. Ken goes hunting with two Chevy executives and accidentally gets shot in the face. Betty tells Don that Sally doesn’t want to visit him anymore and that she wants to go to boarding school. Ted and Peggy’s fondness for each other becomes apparent to others in the office. Harry calls Don to tell him that Sunkist has approved a large media budget. Megan and Don go to the movies to see Rosemary’s Baby and run into Ted and Peggy.

Ken steps down from the Chevy account and Pete offers to take his place in Detroit. All of the partners except Ted are excited about the Sunkist news, but agree they need to start working more coherently on new business. Ted is angry that Ocean Spray will be resigned, but is conflicted since Sunkist is a bigger account. Pete is thwarted when he tries to move Bob off of the Chevy account. Duck Phillips tells Pete that Bob has lied about his education and work history.

Sally stays overnight at Miss Porter’s Boarding School and her student hosts demand alcohol and cigarettes. She calls her friend Glen, who arrives with liquor and a friend, Rolo, who has marijuana. Glen fights with Rolo when Sally accuses him of trying to force her to get physical, which makes her smile. The next day, a pleased Betty offers Sally a cigarette during the drive home from the boarding school visit.

Don tells a St Joseph’s aspirin executive that their expensive commercial was Frank Gleason’s last idea, which gets the client to approve a budget increase, but undermines Ted and Peggy. Later Don tells Ted that his feelings for Peggy are impairing Ted’s judgement. Pete confronts Bob about his identity fraud, but offers a truce so they can work together, as long as Pete is “off limits.” Peggy yells at Don for ruining the St. Joseph’s situation for her and Ted.

Episode twelve referred to vodka and orange juice, hunting, Nixon’s campaign, Cranprune juice, travelers checks, and Rosemary’s Baby, among other things. Here is a selection of ads and images that illustrate some of the products and cultural references mentioned in last night’s Mad Men. A gallery of our highlighted images may also be found on Pinterest and Flickr.

Smirnoff - Blog

shot guns - master - Blog

New England life - hunting - Blog

AAA2126 cropped - Blog

travelers checks - Blog

cranprune juice - Blog

St Joseph childrens asprin - 2

 

Canadian club - Blog

Mad Men Monday Tuesday, Episode 9

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A number of characters faced choices between two people, while others faced rejection or criticism.  Peggy is encouraged to choose between Ted and Don’s ideas for Fleischmann’s margarine. Megan’s performance as twins is criticized. Arlene tries to console Megan, but her sexual advances are spurned. Betty’s slimmed down figure gets a lot of attention from a man at a dinner party, which excites Henry. In frustration, Pete consults with headhunter Duck Phillips about alternative positions. Ted tells Peggy that he has feelings for her, but also that he regrets kissing her. Betty and Don visit Bobby at summer camp.  They reconnect in a happy family moment over lunch and later spend the night together. Don is nostalgic and sentimental about Betty, while she is frank about his shortcomings.  The next morning she happily eats breakfast with Henry, while Don eats alone as if nothing ever happened. Joan and Bob go to the beach with her son, Kevin.  Roger tries to reconnect with Joan with a gift for Kevin, but she rebuffs him.  Roger is also reprimanded by his daughter after taking his grandson to see Planet of the Apes. Peggy is fearful of the crime in her new neighborhood. After a rock is thrown through their apartment window, she arms herself with a knife and accidentally stabs Abe in the abdomen.  In the ambulance Abe breaks up with Peggy, calling her the enemy because of her advertising career. The next day Peggy tells Ted that she and Abe broke up, but Ted seems unmoved by the news and wishes her well in finding someone new.

Episode nine’s plot referred to Esso gasoline, menthol cigarettes, knives, 1965 Cadillacs, and chef salads, among other things.  Here is a selection of ads that illustrate some of the products and cultural references mentioned in Sunday night’s Mad Men.  A gallery of our highlighted images may also be found on Pinterest and Flickr.

Cadilliac - BlogResized

Esso - BlogResized

air conditioner - Blog

winston menthol - Blog

Canadian club - Blog

Cutco knives - BlogResized

SLA0060-Blog 2

Mad Men Monday, Episode 7

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The CGC staff move into the SCDP office space and everyone scrambles to figure out their place at the new agency.  A number of staff members get laid off. Don meets Sylvia at a hotel for a daytime tryst.  Ted leads a creative meeting discussing Fleischmann’s Margarine.  Later he and Don continue brainstorming over drinks in Ted’s office and Ted drinks too much.  Pete’s difficult mother shows up at his apartment and he becomes responsible for her care.  Because of her issues Pete misses an important meeting with Mohawk Airlines.  Ted and Don fly upstate to the Mohawk meeting in Ted’s airplane through a storm.  Sylvia waits for Don at the hotel at his request and a red dress is delivered to her room.  Joan is in pain and Bob Benson takes her discreetly to the emergency room, where he talks the nurse into admitting her.  Later Joan returns the favor by advocating for his job during a meeting about staffing cuts. Sylvia breaks off the affair with Don and he seems devastated.  The episode ends with news of Robert Kennedy’s assassination, which Megan watches in tears.

Episode seven’s plot referred to St. Joseph’s Children’s Aspirin, Fleischmann’s Margarine, Topaz Pantyhose, Mohawk Airlines, gin and tonics, among other things.  Enjoy our selection of ads and images that illustrate some of the products and cultural references mentioned in last night’s Mad Men.  A gallery of our highlighted images may also be found on Pinterest and Flickr.

 

St Joseph Aspirin for Children

Topaz hosery - Blog

Fleischmann's Margarine

 

Fly Mohawk

 

Gilbey's Gin
Cessna

 

Robert F Kennedy Newsweek Cover

 

 

3363989-0

The Accidental Archivist

Issues involved with the handling and preservation of ephemera—campaign buttons, stickers, scrapbooks, photo albums, brochures and pamphlets and such—have been an ongoing concern among curators and archivists, as many of our procedures and best practices concern materials commonly recognized as “important artifacts” such as art, works of prominent photographers, rare manuscripts and books. Many modern manuscript collections pose an additional challenge when they include files of clippings, the two-sided nature of which inadvertently creates an “accidental archive” of items of potential research interest. Many of the Hartman Center’s advertising collections suffer from this wealth of excess. Magazine and newspaper pages containing ads for one product frequently have an equally (if not more) useful ad on the reverse, or a provocative news article. In the example here, taken from the Doris Bryn Papers, the reverse side of a department store ad contains an article “Are Women Persons? Educators Disagree” that appeared in the Oct. 15, 1950 edition of the Sunday Herald.

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The backside of a 1950 advertisement for a department store wonders, “Are Women Persons?”

As indicative of the kinds of debates taking place during the postwar re-integration of women into domestic life and the slow march toward women’s rights and gender equality, the article poses potential research utility; at the least, great fodder for an undergraduate paper. The big challenge is: how to remember where to find these little gems the second time around?

Post contributed by Rick Collier, Technical Services Archivist for the John W. Hartman Center.