Category Archives: Symposia and Conferences

Re-Imagining: Revisited and Revived

Cover of book "Bless Sophia: Worship, Liturgy and Ritual of the Re-Imagining Community"Join the Bingham Center for a two-day event celebrating the history and future of the Re-imagining Movement.

Date: Tuesday, April 18, 2017
Time: 3:30 p.m. reception, followed by a talk at 4 p.m. by Dr. Sara M. Evans
Location: Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room (Rubenstein Library Room 153)
RSVP via Facebook (optional)

Date: Wednesday, April 19, 2017
Time: 12 p.m. with Dr. Sherry Jordon and Dr. Evans; Light lunch served
Location: Forum for Scholars and Publics (Old Chemistry Building Room 011)
RSVP via Facebook (optional)

Photograph of Sara Evans
Dr. Sara Evans

On Tuesday, April 18, distinguished historian Dr. Sara M. Evans, WC’66, will provide a history of the Re-Imagining Movement nearly 25 years after 2000+ theologians, clergy, and laity assembled at the first Re-Imagining conference to address injustices to women and promote equal partnership with men at all levels of religious life. The conservative backlash it prompted inspired conference organizers and participants to create the Re-Imagining Community still active today.

Photograph of Dr. Sherry Jordan
Dr. Sherry Jordon

Then, join us on Wednesday, April 19 as feminist theologian Dr. Sherry Jordon and Dr. Evans discuss the future of the Re-Imagining Movement. Light lunch served.

The events are co-sponsored by the Forum for Scholars and Publics at Duke; the Duke Divinity School; the Program in Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies at Duke University; the Duke University Chapel; and the Resource Center for Women and Ministry in the South.

Symposium: Vesalius and the Languages of Anatomy

Please see details below about an upcoming symposium related to Vesalius and the exhibition Languages of Anatomy: From Vesalius to the Digital Age.

Symposium: Vesalius and the Languages of Anatomy

Organized by Valeria Finucci, CMRS, Romance Studies and Theater Studies

Thursday Sept. 17 and Friday Sept. 18, 2015

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THURSDAY, September 17, 2015, Carpenter Room Rubenstein Library #249, 2nd Floor

Opening Session, 4:00-4:15

Naomi Nelson, Director, Rubenstein Library

  • Welcome Remarks: Today at the Rubenstein”

Valeria FinucciCenter for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, and Romance Studies

  • “Introduction: Vesalius and the Languages of Anatomy”

SESSION I: Visualizing Vesalius, 4:15-6:15

Moderator: Valeria Finucci, Romance Studies, Duke University

Eugene FlammNeurosurgery, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center

  • “Illustration of the Brain in Pre- and Post-Vesalian Publications of the 15th and 16th Centuries”

Margaret BrownExhibit Librarian, Duke University

  • “Collecting and Exhibiting the History of Medicine at Duke University Libraries”

Rachel IngoldCurator, History of Medicine Collection, Duke University

  • “Vesalius in the Trent Collection”

Visit Exhibition, 6:15

“The Languages of Anatomy: From Vesalius to the Digital Age”

  • Chappell Gallery and Trent History of Medicine Room

Welcome Reception, Gothic Lounge, Rubenstein Library, 2nd Floor, 6:45

FRIDAY, September 18, 2015, Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room, Rubenstein Library #153

8:30-9:00 Coffee, tea, pastries, fruit

SESSION II: Vesalius’ Hands-On Knowledge,  9:00-10:45

Moderator: Thomas Robisheaux, History, Duke University

Cynthia KlestinecEnglish, Miami University

  • “Vesalius and the Works of the Hands”

Pablo MauretteComparative Literature, University of Chicago

  • “The Organ of Organs: Vesalius, Casserio, Crooke, and the Wonders of the Human Hand”

10:45-11:15 Coffee Break

SESSION III: Vesalius and Padua, 11:15-1:00

Moderator: Elvira Vilches, Romance Studies, Duke University

Hélène Cazes, French, University of Victoria

  • “The Anatomist, the Butcher, and the Cannibal: the Fabric of Scandal

Maurizio Rippa-BonatiHistory of Medicine, University of Padua, and

Valeria Finucci, Romance Studies, Duke University

  • “Vesalius’ Padua”

Lunch Break, Rubenstein Library, 1:00-2:00

SESSION IV: Vesalius and the Female Body, 2:00-3:45

Moderator: Jehangir Malegam, History, Duke University

Jennifer KosminHistory, Bucknell University

  • “Vesalius’ Midwives: Authority, Gender and Generation in the 1543 Frontispiece of De humani corporis fabrica

Lucia DacomeInstitute for the History & Philosophy of Science and Technology, University of Toronto

  • “Through the Glass Womb: Anatomy and Midwifery in 18th Century Bologna”

Coffee Break, 3:45-4:15

SESSION V: Vesalius’ Legacy, 4:15-6:00

Moderator: Valeria Finucci, Romance Studies, Duke University

Jonathan SawdayEnglish, Saint Louis University

  • “‘But Yet the Body is his Book’: Books of the Body in England After Vesalius.”

Fabrizio BigottiWellcome Trust Centre for Medical History—University of Exeter

  • “Vesalius’ Legacy and its Development in the Medico-Philosophical Contest of the Renaissance”
Contact: Rachel Ingold, (919)684-8549 or rachel.ingold@duke.edu

“Human Rights, Truth Telling, and Justice” Symposium

Date: Friday November 14th, 2014
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Location: Smith Warehouse, Bay 4, Franklin Garage

The Human Rights Archive is co-sponsoring a symposium that will focus on truth telling and justice in the context of human rights. The exciting list of speakers includes representatives from two of the Archive’s partners:

Eduardo GonzalezEduardo González is Director of the International Center for Transitional Justice’s (ICTJ) Truth and Memory Program, which provides advice to countries on truth commissions, declassification of archives, memorialization activities, museums, and other instruments. He has provided technical and strategic support to truth-seeking initiatives in places as diverse as East Timor, Morocco, Liberia, Canada, and the Western Balkans. Before joining ICTJ, he helped organize and carry out the Peruvian Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Previously, he worked as an advocate for the establishment of the International Criminal Court. The historical records of ICTJ are also part of the Human Rights Archive in the Rubenstein Library.

Pamela MerchantPamela Merchant is the Executive Director of the Center for Justice and Accountability (CJA), and an attorney with 25 years of experience in the conduct and management of complex state and federal litigation. She joined CJA in October 2005 and has overseen a period of significant growth – both programmatically and financially. Under her leadership, CJA has grown from an organization devoted solely to human rights litigation in the U.S. to one that also engages in human rights litigation in foreign jurisdictions, such as Spain and Cambodia. Ms. Merchant has testified before Congress on accountability for human rights abusers and other human rights issues and received degrees from Georgetown University and Boston College School of Law. Ms. Merchant will explore changes in the field over the past 30 years with a particular focus on the resilience of survivors and their communities and the critical role they play in building high impact human rights cases.

All sessions are open to the public. For a free lunch, please RSVP to emily.stewart@duke.edu by Thursday November 13th.

Schedule

9:00 am- Coffee and Pastries
9:30-10:30 am- Andrea Petö, “Revised and Revisionist Histories in Eastern Europe” (followed by Q & A)
10:30-11:30 am- Kimberly Theidon, “Incarnations: Legacies of Violence in Peru” (followed by Q & A)
11:45-1:00 pm- Lunch
1:00-2:00 pm- Pamela Merchant, “Truth telling, Human Rights Litigation and Resilience” (followed by Q & A)
2:00-3:00 pm- Eduardo Gonzalez Cueva, “Truth Orthodoxies: The Truth Commission Model, 30 Years after Argentina” (followed by Q & A)
3:00-4:00 pm- Roundtable discussion

Sponsored by The Human Rights Archive at the Rubenstein Library, the Duke Human Rights Center at FHI the Trent Memorial Foundation. Cosponsored by the Center for Latin American Studies, Duke History Department, and Duke Cultural Anthropology.

For further information contact Patrick Stawski, Duke University patrick.stawski@duke.edu 919-660-5823.

2014 Zine Librarians (un)Conference + Zine Reading

ZineLibnZine big cropNext weekJuly 18-19, a diverse group of energetic zine librarians from academic, public, and independent libraries, and archives will meet in Durham to share ideas and skills for providing access to zines to readers in our communities. The Bingham Center’s collection of women’s and queer zines from the 1990s to the present is one of our signature collections was one of the main draws for the selection committee who chose Duke University as the location for the 6th annual Zine Librarians (un)Conference. Though some elements of the program will be planned in advance, the unconference format allows the attendees to determine their interests, goals, and priorities for learning and sharing their knowledge as a group at the beginning of the event.

This conference will have no registration fee in order to increase accessibility to attendees, and will be open to all who are interested in zines and libraries. Elements of the program will be broadcast online to allow wider participation. More details via the zine libraries wiki.

Like zines but can’t make it to the conference? There’ll be a zine reading on Friday, July 18 from 5:30-7:00pm at the Pinhook in Downtown Durham!  Open mic sign-ups to read from your own teenage angsty zine (or the one you wrote last week) or choose a passage from our pile of extras–you know you want to! Zinesters, librarians, riot grrrls, and everyone else are welcome to join. Donations will be collected to support participation by zine librarians of color in next year’s Zine Librarians (un)Conference. RSVP on Facebook.

Bound Images: Maps in Books, 1500-1850

events_bound images map2Date: Thursday, January 30, 2014
Time: 3:00-5:00 PM
Location: Rubenstein Library instruction room (Perkins 318)

A BorderWork(s) Lab event.

When most people think of maps and books they immediately imagine maps, or atlases. Yet maps illustrate and contribute to a larger argument in books of all kinds, including histories, geographies, travel accounts, and novels.  Beyond atlases, maps are often studied or collected as individual items, or “sovereign” maps, in the words of French scholar Christian Jacob.  This discussion dethrones the sovereign map, asking what changes theoretically and curatorially when we think about maps as “bound images” and a graphic part of the story told by authors and printers in book form.

Panelists:
Carla Lois, CONICET, Universidad de Buenos Aires
Matthew Edney, University of Southern Maine, History of Cartography Project
Ricardo Padron, University of Virginia
Susan Danforth, John Carter Brown Library
Jordana Dym, Humanities Writ Large/BorderWork(s) Lab, Duke; Skidmore College

A range of bound cartographic materials from the Rubenstein Library’s collections will be on display.  For more information, see here on the BorderWork(s) Lab website.

Sponsored by the BorderWork(s) Lab at the Franklin Humanities Institute and Humanities Writ Large.

A Decidedly Feminist Taxonomy: Meredith Tax Comes to the Sallie Bingham Center

Meredith Tax, taken by Miriam Berkeley
Meredith Tax, taken by Miriam Berkeley

The personal and professional papers of writer, organizer, and leading women’s movement activist Meredith Tax came to the Sallie Bingham Center in 2010. To celebrate the acquisition of this extensive collection the Center will host a symposium in Tax’s honor on April 13 and 14 called Acting Across Borders: The Future of the Feminist 1970s. Along with Meredith Tax, distinguished African scholar and activist Patricia McFadden will present the keynote address of an event that aims to grapple with how the interventions and methodologies of the women’s liberation movement inform current and future social justice movements. In anticipation of her trip to Duke, Meredith took a few minutes to share her reasons for putting her papers here and to give a sense of what people can expect to learn at the symposium.

Why did you decide to put your papers in the Bingham Center?

I investigated several feminist archives and chose the Bingham Center because it had a much more energetic and activist approach to archival work than I saw elsewhere. I want my papers to be used not only by scholars but by young people who want to learn from the history of earlier social movements. Because the Bingham Center does outreach to inform students about its collections and gives fellowships for researchers to work in its archive, I think my papers will be most accessible there.

What would you tell students about the upcoming symposium celebrating your work?

We are at the dawn of a period of increasing political activism. Attendees at this symposium will learn from the life stories of people who shaped the women’s movement here and internationally. Speakers will talk about their own work and life experiences. They will discuss the way issues of race and class impacted the relationship between feminism and the left, the development of ecofeminism and international women’s movements, and the centrality of questions of sexuality, gender, and LGBT rights. Feminists from Southern Africa, Algeria, and India will discuss their own rich and complex confrontations with sexism, nationalism and religious fundamentalism. These stories will show that, contrary to the right wing myth that feminists are white middle class women who are just out for themselves, feminists in the US and elsewhere have always grappled with issues of race and class, war and peace, nationalism and the environment, and that these efforts continue from one generation to the next.

Frances Ansley and Meredith Tax at a Bread & Roses-organized protest in 1970. Ansley will also speak at the upcoming symposium.
Frances Ansley and Meredith Tax at a Bread & Roses-organized protest in 1970.

What are some of the topics you plan to address in your keynote speech at the symposium?

I will tell the story of my life, from a childhood shaped by the sexism of the 50s to the early days of the Boston women’s movement, battles within the left and my own struggle to overcome the ignorance resulting from class and race privilege, my participation in the reproductive rights movement, and my work in International PEN (Postsecondary Education Network International) as part of a global movement for women’s human rights which must go on in this new period to link the struggle for social and economic justice and sustainability with the fight against all forms of fundamentalism.

For more information on Meredith Tax, check out her website. And be sure to register here to come to the Acting Across Borders symposium on April 13 and 14, 2012. Registration is free and open to the public!

Acting Across Borders: Celebrating the Meredith Tax Papers

Date: Friday, April 13- Saturday, April 14, 2012
Location: Friday: White Lecture Hall, East Campus; Saturday: Gothic Reading Room, Perkins Library
Registration  and Schedule:  http://library.duke.edu/rubenstein/bingham/borders
Contact Information: Kelly Wooten, (919) 660-5967, kelly.wooten[at]duke.edu

Meredith Tax, writer and political activist since the late 1960s, has founded or co-founded a series of feminist and social justice organizations starting with Bread and Roses, an early socialist-feminist group in Boston. Her 1970 essay, “Woman and Her Mind: The Story of Everyday Life,” is considered a foundational text of the U.S. women’s liberation movement. “Acting Across Borders” will focus on the main questions Tax explored in this essay and throughout her work as a feminist: race, class, and internationalism.

This fifth symposium of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History and Culture will feature notable feminist activists, writers, and scholars:

Meredith Tax, writer and political activist

Patricia McFadden, radical African feminist, sociologist, writer, educator, and publisher

Anissa Helie, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, CUNY

Ann Snitow, Director, Gender Studies Program, Eugene Lang College

Mandy Carter, National Coordinator, Bayard Rustin Centennial 2012 Project, National Black Justice Coalition

Amber Hollibaugh, Interim Director, Queers for Economic Justice

Mia Herndon, Executive Director, Third Wave Foundation

Gita Sahgal, Women’s and Human Rights Activist; former head of Amnesty International’s Gender Unit

Ynestra King, Writer and Eco-feminist

Jaclyn Friedman, Writer, Activist, Co-Founder & Executive Director, Women, Action & the Media

Free and open to the public.  Co-sponsored by the Office of the President, the Office of the Provost, the  Dean of Arts and Sciences, Duke University Libraries, African and African American Studies, Franklin Humanities Institute, the Program in Women’s Studies,  the Women’s Center, David M.  Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, and the Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History and Culture. Part of the Future of the Feminist 70s series hosted by the Program in Women’s Studies.

Another March Madness: The American Civil War at 150

Date: Friday, March 16, 2012
Time: 9:00 AM to 7:00 PM
Location: Gothic Reading Room
Contact information: Dr. Shauna Devine, shauna.devine[at]duke.edu

Prominent historians from Duke University, the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, North Carolina State University, and Ohio State University will gather at Duke for a one-day symposium marking the 150th anniversary of the American Civil War. It will feature talks and presentations on a wide range of topics related to the war and its ongoing impact a century and a half later.  This event is free and open to the public.  See the symposium’s website for additional information.

The symposium coincides with the Rubenstein Library’s acclaimed exhibit, “I Recall the Experience Sweet and Sad: Memories of the Civil War,” on display through March 30.  Additional materials focused on Civil War medicine from the Rubenstein Library’s History of Medicine Collections will also be displayed in the Gothic Reading Room on the day of the exhibit.

A Busy Week in Archives Education

(L to R) Panelists Holly Smith, Dr. L. Teresa Church, and Jenn Thompson. Photo courtesy SCOSAA-UNC.

Rubenstein Library staff visited our neighbors in Chapel Hill last week to speak on two panels sponsored by UNC-Chapel Hill’s Student Chapter of the Society of American Archivists (SCOSAA).  Jenn Thompson, the Research Services and Collection Development Librarian for the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture, spoke on November 7 about the Franklin Center’s collections as part of a panel entitled “Diversifying the Archives.”  Naomi Nelson, the Rubenstein’s Director, spoke on November 10 about reappraisal of archival materials with colleagues from UNC’s Wilson Library.  For more information on the panels, see SCOSAA’s blog (linked above) or their Facebook page.

Naomi Nelson (back row center) with fellow panelists Bill Landis, Tim West, and attendees of panel. Photo by Patrick Michael Brown, courtesy SCOSAA-UNC.

“Animated Anatomies: The Human Body in Anatomical Texts”

Date: 6 April-18 July 2011
Location and Time: Perkins Library Gallery during library hours
Contact Information: Meg Brown, 919-681-2071 or meg.brown(at)duke.edu

Physicians' Anatomical Aid, ca. 1880-1890
Physicians' Anatomical Aid, ca. 1880-1890

Animated Anatomies explores the visually stunning and technically complex genre of printed texts and illustrations known as anatomical flap books.

This exhibit traces the flap book genre beginning with early examples from the sixteenth century, to the colorful “golden age” of complex flaps of the nineteenth century, and finally to the common children’s pop-up anatomy books of today. The display—which includes materials from the RBMSCL, the Duke Medical Center Library & Archives’ History of Medicine Collections, and from the private collections of the curators of the exhibit—highlights the history of science, medical instruction, and the intricate art of bookmaking.

The exhibit is curated by Professor Valeria Finucci, Department of Romance Studies, and Maurizio Rippa-Bonati, Department of History of Medicine at the University of Padua, with the assistance of Meg Brown, Duke University Libraries exhibits coordinator, and Rachel Ingold, Curator of the History of Medicine Collections. Items will be exhibited in both the gallery of Perkins Library on Duke’s main campus as well as outside the History of Medicine Reading Room at Duke’s Medical Center Library.

In addition to the exhibit, an opening reception will be held Monday, 18 April, at 10 AM at the History of Medicine Collections, followed by a symposium of renowned scholars in history, medicine, and medical history in Perkins Library. The exhibit and the symposium, both free and open to the public, aim to address a diverse public including those interested in the medical field, history, cultural studies, visual studies, and material studies.

To learn more about the symposium, exhibit, see photos of anatomical flap books, and watch videos of them in action, visit the exhibit website.

Post contributed by Rachel Ingold, Curator of the History of Medicine Collections.