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What’s on our accession shelf?

Every visitor to Technical Services likes to peek down the accessioning shelves and see what new collection materials have recently arrived. One of the most unusual accessions we’ve ever received is a birdhouse, which arrived this spring as part of an addition to the Evans Family Papers. It is a nearly identical miniature of the family’s Durham house, which is still standing (and occupied) on Dacian Avenue. According to the family, the original house was modeled on the style of Le Corbusier. It was built in 1938, making it one of the first examples of “modern architecture” in Durham.

birdhouse
The Evans Family Birdhouse, with a photograph of the original house for comparison.

The family moved away from Durham in 1950, and kept the birdhouse as a fond token of their former home. We were relieved to learn upon intake that no birds ever took up residence. (That would have made for some interesting conservation concerns!)

Post contributed by Meghan Lyon, Technical Services Archivist.




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One thought on “What’s on our accession shelf?”

  1. The actual Durham house from which your birdhouse is taken is documented at the Triangle Modernist [architecture] website, http://www.ncmodernist.org/durham.htm. Durham, in fact, was a hub of designs inspired by Le Corbusier’s residential style, i.e., Villa Savoye. The Gamble House, 1935, preceded the Evans house as ‘one of the first examples of “modern architecture” in Durham’.

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