My most recent project in the conservation lab has been a set of 32 newspapers, issues of the Charleston Courier from 1815 to 1851.  Some time in the past, they had been damaged by water, mold, insects, and dirt.  All of them had tears, and many also had large losses and were exceedingly fragile.  When they arrived in the lab, I could tell immediately that they were going to require a lot of work, but that they would also be fun and rewarding.  While modern newspapers are made of wood pulp which quickly degrades, turning brittle and yellow, old newspapers were printed on rag paper made from textile fibers like cotton and linen, and thus they are much more resilient and pleasant for a conservator to work with.

Charleston Courier newspapers before treatment

Charleston Courier newspapers before treatment

I knew I would need to do aqueous treatments, so, after cleaning off the surface dirt, I tested the inks to make sure they would not be soluble in water.  While the black printing ink was stable, most of the papers had a collection stamp in turquoise ink that was sensitive to water.  However, I was able to find three ionic fixatives, chemicals that are used to make certain dyes insoluble.  I tested all three, and one (Mesitol NBS) turned out to be exactly what this ink needed.  I used a brush to apply a small amount to the blue inked area, working over the suction platen to pull the chemical all the way through the paper, and then my newspapers were ready to wash.

Fixing soluble ink

Fixing soluble ink

Each newspaper was immersed in a bath of deionized water.  Extensive discoloration and degradation products were washed out, turning the water peachy yellow.  I changed the water in each tray until it stayed clear, signaling that washing was complete.  It was rewarding to see what a visual and physical difference there was between the washed and unwashed papers.

Aqueous treatment to remove discoloration and degradation products.  The upper left tray shows the extent of discoloration removed from a page in its first bath.

Aqueous treatment to remove discoloration and degradation products. The upper left tray shows the extent of discoloration removed from a page in its first bath.

Comparison of newspapers before and after washing

Comparison of newspapers before and after washing

After washing and drying, I had many hours of mending to do, and many little puzzle pieces of newspaper to put in place.  For my mends I used wheat starch paste and very thin Japanese papers which are almost transparent so as not to obscure the text on the newspapers.  I did not fill all of the numerous losses, but I made the newspapers more stable for researchers to handle.

Aligning tears to prepare for mending

Aligning tears to prepare for mending

Mending materials: wheat starch paste and lightweight Japanese paperMending materials: wheat starch paste and lightweight Japanese paper

Mending materials: wheat starch paste and lightweight Japanese paper

While working on the repairs, I was often confronted with fragments that would say something like “General / troops / fired” on one side and “congress / voted / article” on the back, and thus I would find myself reading the papers to know where the pieces might belong, which is something I rarely get the chance to do beyond a quick perusal.  The earlier newspapers had battle reports, as the war of 1812 was still going on.  The articles were fascinating, and the advertisements even more so.  Many were similar to modern ads:  houses for rent, job postings, theater listings, lost and found, dubious medical cure-alls, and sales of merchandise, often accompanied by decorative printed icons.  Some were a little more unusual and interesting, like an ad for “Daguerreotype Paintings” or a woman offering her service as a wet nurse.  But I was surprised to see ads for slaves, either for sale or wanting to buy, and many alerts for runaways.  The runaways were the most intriguing as they gave personal details of the individuals, and I found myself wondering what happened to them, applauding their escape and hoping that they found a better life.

Advertisements including a young girl for sale and a runaway slave

Advertisements including a young girl for sale and a runaway slave

When the mending was finished, I housed each of the newspapers in a clear Mylar sleeve so they can be handled with greater ease and safety.  Even after treatment many of them are still fragile, but now they can be handled and used by researchers with much less risk of damage.  And I hope they will be used, as they are fascinating!  To see more images of treatment and examples of interesting advertisements, see our Flickr page.

Newspapers before and after treatment

Newspapers before and after treatment

Post contributed by Grace White, Conservator for Special Collections, as part of our ongoing “In the Conservation Lab” series.

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The shocking shootings in Kansas City during the past weekend have brought renewed attention to Glenn Miller (Glenn Cross), a longtime white supremacist with ties to North Carolina. In Monday’s Washington Post, Robert Satloff, Trinity College class of 1983, wrote about his harrowing experience interviewing Miller in 1981 and the Chronicle article that resulted.

The first-hand account, from the April 15, 1981 issue of the Aeolus (the Chronicle’s weekly magazine of the period) is a frightening glimpse into Miller’s mindset. Satloff wrote, “Perhaps I didn’t think that such close-minded, violent, intolerant people still exist. Perhaps I am naïve. I’m not anymore.”

Read the chilling article below. This issue of the Aeolus, and other Chronicle issues from 1980 to February 1989, will soon be added to the Libraries’ Chronicle digital collection.

UPDATE: The April 15, 1981 issue is now available in full in our Chronicle digital collection.

Click to enlarge.

Click to enlarge.

 

Click to enlarge.

Click to enlarge.

Click to enlarge.

Click to enlarge.

Click to enlarge.

Click to enlarge.

Post contributed by Valerie Gillispie, Duke University Archivist.

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Cover of Gays in the Military by Vincent CianniThe Archive of Documentary Arts has partnered with Daylight Books, the Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History and Culture, the Center for Documentary Studies, and SPECTRE Arts to bring documentary photographers Vincent Cianni and Mariette Pathy Allen to Durham for a series of events April 23-25.

  • Wednesday, April 23 at 12:00pm: A Conversation with Vincent Cianni and Mariette Pathy Allen, Center for Documentary Studies, 1317 W. Pettigrew Street, Durham, N.C. Lunch will be provided.
  • Thursday, April 24 at 6:00pm: Artist Talk and Presentation, SPECTRE Arts green space, 1004 Morning Glory Ave., Durham, N.C.
  • Friday, April 25 at 6:00pm: Book Signing and Opening Exhibit, Daylight Project Space, 121 West Margaret Lane, Hillsborough, NC

The series will culminate in a book signing and exhibition of work by the artists to celebrate the release of the artists’ monographs TransCuba and Gays in the Military. The book signing and exhibit will take place at the Daylight Project Space on April 25 from 6 to 9pm. Refreshments will be served and the artists will be on hand to sign books and answer questions. More information at www.daylightbooks.org

Cover of TransCuba by Mariette Pathy Allen

About the Artists:

Through compelling photographs and interviews made over three years on road trips across the US, Vincent Cianni (born 1952) has created an important historical record of the struggles of gay and lesbian veterans and service members in the US military. As the Human Rights Commission attests, the US military has a long history of civil rights abuses against homosexuals, with harassment and discrimination frequently resulting in lost careers. In many cases, these men and women—highly skilled, well educated, patriotic, courageous and productive—had attained high rank, received numerous medals and held top-level jobs essential to the military. With essays by Alison Nordstrom, Don Bramer and Alan Steinman shedding light on the cultural, personal and political consequences of the ban on homosexuality, this volume tells the stories of men and women who served in silence and oftentimes were penalized and prohibited from receiving the benefits accorded them for serving in the military.

For more than 30 years, New York based photographer and painter Mariette Pathy Allen has been documenting transgender culture worldwide; in 2004 she won the Lambda Literary Award for her monograph The Gender Frontier. In her new publication, TransCuba, Allen focuses on the transgender community of Cuba, especially its growing visibility and acceptance in a country whose government is transitioning into a more relaxed model of communism under Raúl Castro’s presidency. This publication therefore records a cultural watershed within Cuba. In addition to color photographs and interviews by Allen, the book also includes a contribution from Raúl Castro’s daughter, Mariela Castro, who is the director of the Cuban National Center for Sex Education in Havana. In 2005, Castro proposed a project, which became law three years later, to allow transgender individuals to receive sex reassignment surgery and change their legal gender.

Post contributed by Kirston Johnson, Curator of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

 

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Mad Men Mondays logo

Everyone’s favorite ad men and women are back with Season 7 of Mad Men!  Join the Hartman Center as we look back at some ads that resonate with each episode of the new season in what we call Mad Men Mondays.

The episode begins in January 1969 with freelancer Freddy Rumsen pitching a commercial for Accutron watches to an enthusiastic Peggy. Later Peggy pitches a variation on the same ad to new SC&P creative director Lou Avery and is disappointed when he opts for a blander slogan.

Roger wakes up amongst a group of naked sleeping people on the floor of his messy hotel room when his daughter calls to invite him to brunch. A harried and overworked Ken asks Joan to meet with a representative from Butler Footwear in his stead.  She quickly realizes that Butler’s marketing director intends to move all advertising in-house and dismiss SC&P.

Don visits Megan in Los Angeles for the weekend and they have a series of awkward encounters. Don also meets up with a happy, suntanned Pete, who shows him around the new office and brings him up to speed on SC&P gossip. Peggy and Ted have an awkward exchange when he visits the New York office. Joan meets with a Columbia University business professor to get an analysis of Butler Footwear’s plans.  The professor’s ideas help Joan keep Butler’s account from firing SC&P right away.

Roger’s daughter forgives him for all of his transgressions over brunch, which doesn’t seem to sink in with him until later when he lies down with his lover and another man. Don meets a woman on the plane back to New York and they have a candid conversation about their lives, but he declines her offer of more. Peggy has to deal with her tenant’s toilet problems and is frustrated with her life.

Last night’s episode featured references to Accutron watches, Austin Healy, brunch, vodka, and sliding doors, among other things.  Enjoy our selection of highlighted ads that reflect the brands and themes that Mad Men characters interacted with last night.

A gallery of our selected images may also be found on Flickr.

Accutron

Schlitz

Norelco Electric Razors

Berkshire Pantyhose

Austin Healy Ad

Piper Champagne Ad

The Year of the Brunch Booklet

Smirnoff Ad

Playboy Ad

Magnavox Ad

TWA Ad

 Cover, J. Walter Thompson Annual Report, 1969Nixon Inauguration, Life MagazineMeds Tampons Ad

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